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The Resource A grammar of the Seneca language, Wallace Chafe with the help and collaboration of Albert Austin [and 27 others]

A grammar of the Seneca language, Wallace Chafe with the help and collaboration of Albert Austin [and 27 others]

Label
A grammar of the Seneca language
Title
A grammar of the Seneca language
Statement of responsibility
Wallace Chafe with the help and collaboration of Albert Austin [and 27 others]
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
The Seneca language belongs to the Northern Iroquoian branch of the Iroquoian language family, where its closest relatives are Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida, Mohawk, and Tuscarora. Seneca holds special typological interest because of its high degree of polysynthesis and fusion. It is historically important because of its central role in the Longhouse religion and its place in the pioneering linguistic work of the 19th century missionary Asher Wright. This grammatical description, which includes four extended texts in several genres, is the culminatin of Chafe's long term study of the language over half a century
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Chafe, Wallace L
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Seneca language
  • FOREIGN LANGUAGE STUDY
  • LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES
Label
A grammar of the Seneca language, Wallace Chafe with the help and collaboration of Albert Austin [and 27 others]
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- A Grammar of the Seneca Language -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- CONTENTS -- Acknowledgments -- Tables -- Abbreviations -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Phonetics and Phonology -- 2.1. Introduction -- 2.2. Seneca vowels today -- 2.3. Seneca consonants today -- 2.4. Vowels and consonants reconstructed for Proto-Northern-Iroquoian -- 2.5. Reconstructed Seneca at an earlier time -- 2.6. The assignment of vowel length in modern seneca -- 2.6.1. Vowel length in an even-numbered penult -- 2.6.2. Vowel length in an odd-numbered penult -- 2.6.3. Vowel length from other sources -- 2.7. The assignment of accent in modern Seneca -- 2.7.1 Accenting of an even-numbered short vowel -- 2.7.2. Accenting of an even-numbered short vowel when the following odd-numbered vowel conformed to 2.7.1 -- 2.7.3. Words with multiple accents -- 2.7.4. Words with no accent -- 2.7.5. The absence of accent on initial and final vowels -- 2.7.6. Accent spreading -- 2.7.7. Three definitions of 'closed syllable' -- 2.8. Phonological changes shared with all the Northern Iroquoian languages -- 2.9. Phonological changes not shared with all the Northern Iroquoian languages -- 2.10. Phonological changes still in progress and applying only to casual speech -- 3. Verb Morphology Part 1. The Minimal Verb -- 3.1. Introduction -- 3.2. The habitual and stative aspect suffixes -- 3.2.1. Meanings of the habitual and stative suffixes -- 3.2.1.1. Nonconsequential events -- 3.2.1.2. Consequential events -- 3.2.2. Stative-only verb roots -- 3.2.3. Forms of the habitual and stative suffixes -- 3.3. The punctual aspect suffix and the modal prefixes -- 3.3.1. Introduction -- 3.3.2. Meanings of the modal prefixes -- 3.3.2.1. The factual prefix -- 3.3.2.2. The future prefix -- 3.3.2.3. The hypothetical prefix -- 3.3.3. Forms of the punctual aspect suffix -- 3.3.4. Forms of the modal prefixes
  • 3.3.4.1. Forms of the factual prefix -- 3.3.4.2. Forms of the future prefix -- 3.3.4.3. Forms of the hypothetical prefix -- 3.4. The pronominal prefixes -- 3.4.1. Introduction -- 3.4.2. Neuter singular agents and patients -- 3.4.3. Ambiguity of the feminine singular forms -- 3.4.4. Relics of a feminine-zoic category -- 3.4.4.1. Women's names -- 3.4.4.2. The pronominal prefix göwö- (*köwa- ) -- 3.4.4.3. Irregular kinship terms. -- 3.4.4.4. Summary of feminine-zoic relics -- 3.4.5. Forms of the pronominal prefixes -- 3.4.5.1. Loss of initial segments -- 3.4.5.2. Forms conditioned by the following environment -- 4. Verb Morphology Part 2: The Prepronominal Prefixes -- 4.1. Introduction -- 4.2. The repetitive prefix -- 4.2.1. Uses of the repetitive prefix -- 4.2.2. Forms of the repetitive prefix -- 4.3. The cislocative prefix -- 4.3.1. Uses of the cislocative prefix -- 4.3.2. Forms of the cislocative prefix -- 4.4. The duplicative prefix -- 4.4.1. Uses of the duplicative prefix -- 4.4.1.1. Word-internal borrowing from English -- 4.4.1.2. The duplicative in place of the repetitive -- 4.4.1.3. The reciprocal construction -- 4.4.2. Forms of the duplicative prefix -- 4.5. The translocative prefix -- 4.5.1. Uses of the translocative prefix -- 4.5.2. Forms of the translocative prefix -- 4.6. The partitive prefix -- 4.6.1. Uses of the partitive prefix -- 4.6.2. Forms of the partitive prefix -- 4.7. The coincident prefix -- 4.7.1. Uses of the coincident prefix -- 4.7.2. Forms of the coincident prefix -- 4.8. The contrastive prefix -- 4.8.1. Uses of the contrastive prefix -- 4.8.2. Forms of the contrastive prefix -- 4.9. The negative prefix -- 4.9.1. Uses of the negative prefix -- 4.9.1.1. The negative prefix with a particle -- 4.9.1.2. The negative prefix with a noun -- 4.9.2. Forms of the negative prefix -- 4.9.3. Future and past negations
  • 5. Verb Morphology Part 3: Expanded Verb Bases -- 5.1. Introduction -- 5.2. The middle voice prefix -- 5.2.1. Functions of the middle voice prefix -- 5.2.2. Forms of the middle voice prefix -- 5.3. The reflexive prefix -- 5.3.1. Functions of the reflexive prefix -- 5.3.2. Forms of the reflexive prefix -- 5.3.3. The reciprocal construction -- 5.4. The incorporated noun root -- 5.4.1. Functions of noun incorporation -- 5.4.2. The 'stem-joiner' vowel -- 5.4.3. Noun roots of manner -- 5.4.3.1. The manner noun root *-na'skw- 'jump' -- 5.4.3.2. The manner noun root *-karh- 'turn' -- 5.5. Derivational suffixes -- 5.5.1. Introduction -- 5.5.2. The inchoative suffix. -- 5.5.3. The archaic causative suffix -- 5.5.4. The new causative suffix -- 5.5.5. The instrumental suffix -- 5.5.6. The distributive suffix -- 5.5.6.1. The double distributive -- 5.5.7. The benefactive suffix -- 5.5.8. The andative suffix -- 5.5.8.1. The andative plus purposive construction -- 5.5.9. The ambulative suffix -- 5.5.10. The directive suffix -- 5.5.11. The archaic reversive suffix -- 5.5.12. The new reversive suffix -- 5.5.13. The facilitative suffix -- 5.5.14. The eventuative suffix -- 5.5.15. Combinations of derivational suffixes -- 6. Verb Morphology Part 4: Extended Aspect Suffixes -- 6.1. Introduction -- 6.2. The stative-distributive suffix -- 6.2.1. Other forms of the stative-distributive suffix -- 6.3. The past suffix -- 6.3.1. Forms of the past suffix with the habitual aspect -- 6.3.2. Forms of the past suffix with the stative aspect -- 6.3.3. The future perfect passive construction -- 6.4. The progressive suffix -- 6.5. The continuative suffix -- 6.5.1. The continuative suffix with the habitual aspect -- 6.5.2. The continuative suffix with the stative aspect -- 6.5.3. The continuative suffix with imperatives -- 7. Noun Morphology -- 7.1. Introduction
  • 7.2. The noun suffixes -- 7.2.1. The simple noun suffix -- 7.2.2. The external locative suffix -- 7.2.3. The internal locative suffix -- 7.3. Positional verb roots in place of the simple noun suffix -- 7.3.1. Examples of noun roots with *-yë' 'be laid out' -- 7.3.2. Examples of noun roots with *-ot 'be standing upright' -- 7.3.3. Examples of noun roots with *-te' 'be in place' -- 7.4. Pronominal prefixes with nouns -- 7.4.1. The neuter prefixes -- 7.4.2. Alienable possession -- 7.4.3. Inalienable possession -- 7.4.4. Nouns that lack a pronominal prefix -- 7.5. Prepronominal prefixes with nouns -- 7.5.1. The repetitive prefix with nouns -- 7.5.2. The cislocative prefix with nouns -- 7.5.3. The partitive prefix with nouns -- 7.5.4. The coincident prefix with nouns -- 7.5.5. The negative prefix with nouns -- 7.6. Nominalized verb bases -- 7.6.1. The nominalizing suffix *-hshr- / *-'shr -- 7.6.2. The nominalizing suffix *-'t-. -- 7.7. The proper nominalizer *-' -- 8. Clitics -- 8.1. Introduction -- 8.2. The augmentative -- 8.3. The diminutive -- 8.4. The characterizer -- 8.5. The populative -- 8.6. The decessive -- 8.7. The directional -- 8.8. The nominal distributive -- 8.9. The intensifier -- 8.10. The nativizer -- 8.11. Clitic sequences -- 9. Kinship Terms -- 9.1. Introduction -- 9.2. Relatives in general -- 9.3. Relatives of the same generation -- 9.3.1. Twins -- 9.3.2. Siblings -- 9.3.3. Cousins -- 9.4. Relatives one generation apart -- 9.4.1. Parents and children -- 9.4.2. Sons and daughters -- 9.4.3. Mother -- 9.4.4. Father -- 9.4.5. Aunts and uncles -- 9.4.6. Nieces and nephews -- 9.5. Grandparents and grandchildren -- 9.6. Great-grandparents and great-grandchildren -- 9.7. Relatives by marriage -- 9.7.1. Spouse -- 9.7.2. Siblings-in-law -- 9.7.3. Parents-in-law -- 9.8. Step-parents and step-children -- 9.9. Relatives by adoption
  • 9.10. Ritual friendship -- 9.11. Casual friendship -- 10. Syntax Part 1. Amplifying a Pronominal Meaning -- 10.1. Introduction -- 10.2. First and second person pronouns -- 10.2.1. The first person independent pronoun i:' -- 10.2.1.1. First person plus neh in ni:' -- 10.2.1.2. First person plus -ah in i:'ah -- 10.2.2.3. Second person plus neh and -'ah in ni:s'ah -- 10.2.2. The second person independent pronoun i:s -- 10.2.2.1. Second person plus neh in ni:s -- 10.2.2.2. Second person plus diminutive -'ah in i:s'ah -- 10.2.2.3. Second person plus neh and -'ah in ni:s'ah -- 10.3. The noun root *-öhw- '-self' -- 10.3.1. The stem *-öhwa' kehah 'oneself alone' -- 10.4. Indefinite pronouns -- 10.4.1. sö:ga:' 'someone, anyone' -- 10.4.1.1. de'sö:ga:' 'no one' -- 10.4.2. ha'gwísdë' or gwisdë' 'something' -- 10.4.2.1. da'ágwisdë' or da'gwísdë' 'nothing' -- 10.4.3. na'áhdë'ëh 'things' -- 10.4.4. gye:h 'some' -- 10.5. Demonstrative pronouns -- 10.5.1. në:gë:h 'this' and hi:gë:h 'that' -- 10.5.2. The particle i:gë:h. -- 10.5.3. në:dah 'this here' and né:ne' 'that there' -- 10.5.4. ne'hoh 'that or there' -- 10.5.4.1. Distal location in discourse -- 10.5.4.2. Distal location in space -- 10.5.4.3. Appositional demonstrative ne'hoh -- 10.6. The particle neh 'namely' -- 10.6.1. Amplification with a noun -- 10.6.2. Amplification with a verb -- 10.6.3. The particle sequence ne:' neh -- 11. Syntax Part 2. Amplifying a spatial, temporal, or modal meaning -- 11.1. Introduction -- 11.2. Location in space -- 11.3. Location in time -- 11.4. Epistemic orientation -- 11.5. Orientation in degree -- 12. Syntax Part 3. Amplifying the meaning of an entire verb -- 12.1. Introduction -- 12.2. Spatial subordination -- 12.3. Temporal subordination -- 12.4. Manner subordination -- 12.5. Purposive subordination -- 12.6. Attributing speech -- 12.7. Attributing thought
Control code
ocn897376920
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unknown
Extent
1 online resource
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unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780520961647
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctt132x8q2
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
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unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)897376920
Label
A grammar of the Seneca language, Wallace Chafe with the help and collaboration of Albert Austin [and 27 others]
Publication
Copyright
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- A Grammar of the Seneca Language -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- CONTENTS -- Acknowledgments -- Tables -- Abbreviations -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Phonetics and Phonology -- 2.1. Introduction -- 2.2. Seneca vowels today -- 2.3. Seneca consonants today -- 2.4. Vowels and consonants reconstructed for Proto-Northern-Iroquoian -- 2.5. Reconstructed Seneca at an earlier time -- 2.6. The assignment of vowel length in modern seneca -- 2.6.1. Vowel length in an even-numbered penult -- 2.6.2. Vowel length in an odd-numbered penult -- 2.6.3. Vowel length from other sources -- 2.7. The assignment of accent in modern Seneca -- 2.7.1 Accenting of an even-numbered short vowel -- 2.7.2. Accenting of an even-numbered short vowel when the following odd-numbered vowel conformed to 2.7.1 -- 2.7.3. Words with multiple accents -- 2.7.4. Words with no accent -- 2.7.5. The absence of accent on initial and final vowels -- 2.7.6. Accent spreading -- 2.7.7. Three definitions of 'closed syllable' -- 2.8. Phonological changes shared with all the Northern Iroquoian languages -- 2.9. Phonological changes not shared with all the Northern Iroquoian languages -- 2.10. Phonological changes still in progress and applying only to casual speech -- 3. Verb Morphology Part 1. The Minimal Verb -- 3.1. Introduction -- 3.2. The habitual and stative aspect suffixes -- 3.2.1. Meanings of the habitual and stative suffixes -- 3.2.1.1. Nonconsequential events -- 3.2.1.2. Consequential events -- 3.2.2. Stative-only verb roots -- 3.2.3. Forms of the habitual and stative suffixes -- 3.3. The punctual aspect suffix and the modal prefixes -- 3.3.1. Introduction -- 3.3.2. Meanings of the modal prefixes -- 3.3.2.1. The factual prefix -- 3.3.2.2. The future prefix -- 3.3.2.3. The hypothetical prefix -- 3.3.3. Forms of the punctual aspect suffix -- 3.3.4. Forms of the modal prefixes
  • 3.3.4.1. Forms of the factual prefix -- 3.3.4.2. Forms of the future prefix -- 3.3.4.3. Forms of the hypothetical prefix -- 3.4. The pronominal prefixes -- 3.4.1. Introduction -- 3.4.2. Neuter singular agents and patients -- 3.4.3. Ambiguity of the feminine singular forms -- 3.4.4. Relics of a feminine-zoic category -- 3.4.4.1. Women's names -- 3.4.4.2. The pronominal prefix göwö- (*köwa- ) -- 3.4.4.3. Irregular kinship terms. -- 3.4.4.4. Summary of feminine-zoic relics -- 3.4.5. Forms of the pronominal prefixes -- 3.4.5.1. Loss of initial segments -- 3.4.5.2. Forms conditioned by the following environment -- 4. Verb Morphology Part 2: The Prepronominal Prefixes -- 4.1. Introduction -- 4.2. The repetitive prefix -- 4.2.1. Uses of the repetitive prefix -- 4.2.2. Forms of the repetitive prefix -- 4.3. The cislocative prefix -- 4.3.1. Uses of the cislocative prefix -- 4.3.2. Forms of the cislocative prefix -- 4.4. The duplicative prefix -- 4.4.1. Uses of the duplicative prefix -- 4.4.1.1. Word-internal borrowing from English -- 4.4.1.2. The duplicative in place of the repetitive -- 4.4.1.3. The reciprocal construction -- 4.4.2. Forms of the duplicative prefix -- 4.5. The translocative prefix -- 4.5.1. Uses of the translocative prefix -- 4.5.2. Forms of the translocative prefix -- 4.6. The partitive prefix -- 4.6.1. Uses of the partitive prefix -- 4.6.2. Forms of the partitive prefix -- 4.7. The coincident prefix -- 4.7.1. Uses of the coincident prefix -- 4.7.2. Forms of the coincident prefix -- 4.8. The contrastive prefix -- 4.8.1. Uses of the contrastive prefix -- 4.8.2. Forms of the contrastive prefix -- 4.9. The negative prefix -- 4.9.1. Uses of the negative prefix -- 4.9.1.1. The negative prefix with a particle -- 4.9.1.2. The negative prefix with a noun -- 4.9.2. Forms of the negative prefix -- 4.9.3. Future and past negations
  • 5. Verb Morphology Part 3: Expanded Verb Bases -- 5.1. Introduction -- 5.2. The middle voice prefix -- 5.2.1. Functions of the middle voice prefix -- 5.2.2. Forms of the middle voice prefix -- 5.3. The reflexive prefix -- 5.3.1. Functions of the reflexive prefix -- 5.3.2. Forms of the reflexive prefix -- 5.3.3. The reciprocal construction -- 5.4. The incorporated noun root -- 5.4.1. Functions of noun incorporation -- 5.4.2. The 'stem-joiner' vowel -- 5.4.3. Noun roots of manner -- 5.4.3.1. The manner noun root *-na'skw- 'jump' -- 5.4.3.2. The manner noun root *-karh- 'turn' -- 5.5. Derivational suffixes -- 5.5.1. Introduction -- 5.5.2. The inchoative suffix. -- 5.5.3. The archaic causative suffix -- 5.5.4. The new causative suffix -- 5.5.5. The instrumental suffix -- 5.5.6. The distributive suffix -- 5.5.6.1. The double distributive -- 5.5.7. The benefactive suffix -- 5.5.8. The andative suffix -- 5.5.8.1. The andative plus purposive construction -- 5.5.9. The ambulative suffix -- 5.5.10. The directive suffix -- 5.5.11. The archaic reversive suffix -- 5.5.12. The new reversive suffix -- 5.5.13. The facilitative suffix -- 5.5.14. The eventuative suffix -- 5.5.15. Combinations of derivational suffixes -- 6. Verb Morphology Part 4: Extended Aspect Suffixes -- 6.1. Introduction -- 6.2. The stative-distributive suffix -- 6.2.1. Other forms of the stative-distributive suffix -- 6.3. The past suffix -- 6.3.1. Forms of the past suffix with the habitual aspect -- 6.3.2. Forms of the past suffix with the stative aspect -- 6.3.3. The future perfect passive construction -- 6.4. The progressive suffix -- 6.5. The continuative suffix -- 6.5.1. The continuative suffix with the habitual aspect -- 6.5.2. The continuative suffix with the stative aspect -- 6.5.3. The continuative suffix with imperatives -- 7. Noun Morphology -- 7.1. Introduction
  • 7.2. The noun suffixes -- 7.2.1. The simple noun suffix -- 7.2.2. The external locative suffix -- 7.2.3. The internal locative suffix -- 7.3. Positional verb roots in place of the simple noun suffix -- 7.3.1. Examples of noun roots with *-yë' 'be laid out' -- 7.3.2. Examples of noun roots with *-ot 'be standing upright' -- 7.3.3. Examples of noun roots with *-te' 'be in place' -- 7.4. Pronominal prefixes with nouns -- 7.4.1. The neuter prefixes -- 7.4.2. Alienable possession -- 7.4.3. Inalienable possession -- 7.4.4. Nouns that lack a pronominal prefix -- 7.5. Prepronominal prefixes with nouns -- 7.5.1. The repetitive prefix with nouns -- 7.5.2. The cislocative prefix with nouns -- 7.5.3. The partitive prefix with nouns -- 7.5.4. The coincident prefix with nouns -- 7.5.5. The negative prefix with nouns -- 7.6. Nominalized verb bases -- 7.6.1. The nominalizing suffix *-hshr- / *-'shr -- 7.6.2. The nominalizing suffix *-'t-. -- 7.7. The proper nominalizer *-' -- 8. Clitics -- 8.1. Introduction -- 8.2. The augmentative -- 8.3. The diminutive -- 8.4. The characterizer -- 8.5. The populative -- 8.6. The decessive -- 8.7. The directional -- 8.8. The nominal distributive -- 8.9. The intensifier -- 8.10. The nativizer -- 8.11. Clitic sequences -- 9. Kinship Terms -- 9.1. Introduction -- 9.2. Relatives in general -- 9.3. Relatives of the same generation -- 9.3.1. Twins -- 9.3.2. Siblings -- 9.3.3. Cousins -- 9.4. Relatives one generation apart -- 9.4.1. Parents and children -- 9.4.2. Sons and daughters -- 9.4.3. Mother -- 9.4.4. Father -- 9.4.5. Aunts and uncles -- 9.4.6. Nieces and nephews -- 9.5. Grandparents and grandchildren -- 9.6. Great-grandparents and great-grandchildren -- 9.7. Relatives by marriage -- 9.7.1. Spouse -- 9.7.2. Siblings-in-law -- 9.7.3. Parents-in-law -- 9.8. Step-parents and step-children -- 9.9. Relatives by adoption
  • 9.10. Ritual friendship -- 9.11. Casual friendship -- 10. Syntax Part 1. Amplifying a Pronominal Meaning -- 10.1. Introduction -- 10.2. First and second person pronouns -- 10.2.1. The first person independent pronoun i:' -- 10.2.1.1. First person plus neh in ni:' -- 10.2.1.2. First person plus -ah in i:'ah -- 10.2.2.3. Second person plus neh and -'ah in ni:s'ah -- 10.2.2. The second person independent pronoun i:s -- 10.2.2.1. Second person plus neh in ni:s -- 10.2.2.2. Second person plus diminutive -'ah in i:s'ah -- 10.2.2.3. Second person plus neh and -'ah in ni:s'ah -- 10.3. The noun root *-öhw- '-self' -- 10.3.1. The stem *-öhwa' kehah 'oneself alone' -- 10.4. Indefinite pronouns -- 10.4.1. sö:ga:' 'someone, anyone' -- 10.4.1.1. de'sö:ga:' 'no one' -- 10.4.2. ha'gwísdë' or gwisdë' 'something' -- 10.4.2.1. da'ágwisdë' or da'gwísdë' 'nothing' -- 10.4.3. na'áhdë'ëh 'things' -- 10.4.4. gye:h 'some' -- 10.5. Demonstrative pronouns -- 10.5.1. në:gë:h 'this' and hi:gë:h 'that' -- 10.5.2. The particle i:gë:h. -- 10.5.3. në:dah 'this here' and né:ne' 'that there' -- 10.5.4. ne'hoh 'that or there' -- 10.5.4.1. Distal location in discourse -- 10.5.4.2. Distal location in space -- 10.5.4.3. Appositional demonstrative ne'hoh -- 10.6. The particle neh 'namely' -- 10.6.1. Amplification with a noun -- 10.6.2. Amplification with a verb -- 10.6.3. The particle sequence ne:' neh -- 11. Syntax Part 2. Amplifying a spatial, temporal, or modal meaning -- 11.1. Introduction -- 11.2. Location in space -- 11.3. Location in time -- 11.4. Epistemic orientation -- 11.5. Orientation in degree -- 12. Syntax Part 3. Amplifying the meaning of an entire verb -- 12.1. Introduction -- 12.2. Spatial subordination -- 12.3. Temporal subordination -- 12.4. Manner subordination -- 12.5. Purposive subordination -- 12.6. Attributing speech -- 12.7. Attributing thought
Control code
ocn897376920
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780520961647
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctt132x8q2
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)897376920

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