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The Resource A history of the science and politics of climate change : the role of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Bert Bolin

A history of the science and politics of climate change : the role of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Bert Bolin

Label
A history of the science and politics of climate change : the role of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
Title
A history of the science and politics of climate change
Title remainder
the role of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
Statement of responsibility
Bert Bolin
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • The issue of human-induced global climate change became a major environmental concern during the twentieth century, and is the paramount environmental concern of the twenty-first century. Response to climate change requires effective interaction from the scientific community, society in general, and politicians in particular. The Intergovernmental Panel on climate Change (IPCC), formed in 1988, has gradually developed to become the key UN body in providing this service to the countries of the world
  • Written by its first Chairman, this book is a unique overview of the history of the IPCC. It describes and evaluates the intricate interplay between key factors in the science and politics of climate change, the strategy that has been followed, and the regretfully slow pace in getting to grips with the uncertainties that have prevented earlier action being taken. The book also highlights the emerging conflict between establishing a sustainable global energy system and preventing a serious change in global climate. This text provides researchers and policy makers with an insight into the history of the politics of climate change
Cataloging source
UKM
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1925-2007
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Bolin, Bert
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
QC981.8.C5
LC item number
B643 2007
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
  • Climatic changes
  • Climatic changes
  • Climatic changes
  • Climatic changes
  • Greenhouse gas mitigation
  • Greenhouse gas mitigation
  • Greenhouse gas mitigation
Label
A history of the science and politics of climate change : the role of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Bert Bolin
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 262-272) and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • The
  • The
  • approval of the 1994 IPCC special report runs into difficulties
  • p. 102.
  • 7.8.
  • Preparing for the future role of the IPCC
  • p. 104.
  • 8.
  • The
  • IPCC second assessment report
  • p. 106.
  • natural carbon cycle and life on earth
  • 8.1.
  • First party conference of the FCCC
  • p. 106.
  • 8.2.
  • The
  • IPCC Second Assessment Report
  • p. 111.
  • 8.3.
  • Stabilisation of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations
  • p. 119.
  • p. 9.
  • 8.4.
  • The
  • synthesis report
  • p. 122.
  • 9.
  • In the aftermath of the IPCC second assessment
  • p. 125.
  • 9.1.
  • The
  • post-Second Assessment Report discussions of an action programme to be agreed in Kyoto
  • 2.1.
  • p. 125.
  • 9.2.
  • The
  • IPCC assessment is challenged
  • p. 126.
  • 9.3.
  • Preparations for the third conference of the parties to FCCC in Kyoto
  • p. 137.
  • 9.4.
  • Increasing industrialisation and globalisation of the world
  • Glimpses of the historical development of our knowledge
  • p. 143.
  • 9.5.
  • Starting work towards a third assessment
  • p. 144.
  • 10.
  • The
  • Kyoto Protocol is agreed and a third assessment begun
  • p. 147.
  • 10.1.
  • Central themes of the Protocol
  • p. 9.
  • p. 147.
  • 10.2.
  • The
  • interplay of science and politics
  • p. 153.
  • 10.3.
  • Opposition to the Kyoto Protocol grows
  • p. 154.
  • 10.4.
  • How to settle disagreements on the interpretation of the Kyoto Protocol
  • 2.2.
  • p. 159.
  • 11.
  • A
  • decade of hesitance and slow progress
  • p. 163.
  • 11.1.
  • Work towards the IPCC Third Assessment Report
  • p. 163.
  • 11.2.
  • Resistance towards taking action and political manoeuvring
  • A
  • p. 178.
  • 11.3.
  • Other challenges of the IPCC conclusions
  • p. 181.
  • 11.4.
  • The
  • leadership of the IPCC is changed
  • p. 185.
  • 11.5.
  • Ratifications of the Kyoto Protocol
  • simplified view of the present carbon cycle
  • p. 187.
  • 11.6.
  • The
  • eleventh conference of the parties to the Climate Convention
  • p. 190.
  • Part III.
  • Are we at a turning point in addressing climate change?
  • p. 193.
  • 12.
  • Key scientific findings of prime political relevance
  • p. 13.
  • p. 195.
  • 12.1.
  • The
  • general setting
  • p. 195.
  • 12.2.
  • The
  • story of global warming told to politicians, stakeholders and the public
  • p. 196.
  • 12.3.
  • Part I.
  • 3.
  • Impacts and adaptation
  • p. 210.
  • 12.4.
  • Science, media and the general public
  • p. 211.
  • 13.
  • Climate change and a future sustainable global energy supply
  • p. 214.
  • 13.1.
  • Delayed action in spite of trustworthy scientific assessments
  • Global research initiatives in meteorology and climatology
  • p. 214.
  • 13.2.
  • Past and future emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols
  • p. 215.
  • 13.3.
  • Primary energy reserves and resources and their utilisation
  • p. 224.
  • 13.4.
  • The
  • supply of energy under the constraints of minimising climate change
  • p. 19.
  • p. 233.
  • 13.5.
  • The
  • need for a multidimensional approach
  • p. 238.
  • 13.6.
  • The
  • economy of a transition to a sustainable energy supply system
  • p. 242.
  • 13.7.
  • 3.1.
  • Politics of securing a global sustainable energy supply system
  • p. 245
  • Building scientific networks
  • p. 19.
  • 3.2.
  • Concern for the environment reaches the political agenda
  • p. 17.
  • 3.3.
  • The
  • The
  • Global Atmospheric Research Programme becomes engaged in the climate issue
  • p. 28.
  • 4.
  • Early international assessments of climate change
  • p. 33.
  • 4.1.
  • Initiation of assessments aimed at politicians and society
  • p. 33.
  • Part II.
  • early history of the climate change issue
  • The
  • climate change issue becomes one of global concern
  • p. 41.
  • 5.1.
  • The
  • report by the UN Commission on Environment and Development
  • p. 43.
  • 5.2.
  • How to create a forum for interactions between science and politics
  • p. 45.
  • p. 1.
  • 5.3.
  • The
  • IPCC is formed and a first assessment is begun
  • p. 49.
  • 6.
  • The
  • scientific basis for a climate convention
  • p. 53.
  • 6.1.
  • Work begins
  • 1.
  • p. 53.
  • 6.2.
  • Politicians are anxious to show their concern for the environment
  • p. 56.
  • 6.3.
  • The
  • IPCC works towards the completion of the First Assessment Report
  • p. 61.
  • 6.4.
  • The
  • Nineteenth-century discoveries
  • acceptance and approval of the IPCC First Assessment Report
  • p. 67.
  • 6.5.
  • Scientific input in the negotiations about a framework convention
  • p. 68.
  • 6.6.
  • What has experience so far to say about the role of science?
  • p. 77.
  • 7.
  • Serving the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee
  • p. 3.
  • p. 79.
  • 7.1.
  • Changes in the IPCC structure and new members of the Bureau
  • p. 79.
  • 7.2.
  • Cooperation with the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee
  • p. 85.
  • 7.3.
  • Predictions or scenarios of future changes of the global climate?
  • p. 87.
  • 2.
  • 7.4.
  • Attempting to put Article 2 of the Climate Convention into focus
  • p. 93.
  • 7.5.
  • Equity and social considerations
  • p. 94.
  • 7.6.
  • Growing awareness of climate change and polarisation of opinions
  • p. 97.
  • 7.7.
Control code
154682307
Dimensions
26 cm
Extent
xiii, 277 pages
Isbn
9780521880824
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Lccn
2008271015
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)154682307
Label
A history of the science and politics of climate change : the role of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Bert Bolin
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 262-272) and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • The
  • The
  • approval of the 1994 IPCC special report runs into difficulties
  • p. 102.
  • 7.8.
  • Preparing for the future role of the IPCC
  • p. 104.
  • 8.
  • The
  • IPCC second assessment report
  • p. 106.
  • natural carbon cycle and life on earth
  • 8.1.
  • First party conference of the FCCC
  • p. 106.
  • 8.2.
  • The
  • IPCC Second Assessment Report
  • p. 111.
  • 8.3.
  • Stabilisation of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations
  • p. 119.
  • p. 9.
  • 8.4.
  • The
  • synthesis report
  • p. 122.
  • 9.
  • In the aftermath of the IPCC second assessment
  • p. 125.
  • 9.1.
  • The
  • post-Second Assessment Report discussions of an action programme to be agreed in Kyoto
  • 2.1.
  • p. 125.
  • 9.2.
  • The
  • IPCC assessment is challenged
  • p. 126.
  • 9.3.
  • Preparations for the third conference of the parties to FCCC in Kyoto
  • p. 137.
  • 9.4.
  • Increasing industrialisation and globalisation of the world
  • Glimpses of the historical development of our knowledge
  • p. 143.
  • 9.5.
  • Starting work towards a third assessment
  • p. 144.
  • 10.
  • The
  • Kyoto Protocol is agreed and a third assessment begun
  • p. 147.
  • 10.1.
  • Central themes of the Protocol
  • p. 9.
  • p. 147.
  • 10.2.
  • The
  • interplay of science and politics
  • p. 153.
  • 10.3.
  • Opposition to the Kyoto Protocol grows
  • p. 154.
  • 10.4.
  • How to settle disagreements on the interpretation of the Kyoto Protocol
  • 2.2.
  • p. 159.
  • 11.
  • A
  • decade of hesitance and slow progress
  • p. 163.
  • 11.1.
  • Work towards the IPCC Third Assessment Report
  • p. 163.
  • 11.2.
  • Resistance towards taking action and political manoeuvring
  • A
  • p. 178.
  • 11.3.
  • Other challenges of the IPCC conclusions
  • p. 181.
  • 11.4.
  • The
  • leadership of the IPCC is changed
  • p. 185.
  • 11.5.
  • Ratifications of the Kyoto Protocol
  • simplified view of the present carbon cycle
  • p. 187.
  • 11.6.
  • The
  • eleventh conference of the parties to the Climate Convention
  • p. 190.
  • Part III.
  • Are we at a turning point in addressing climate change?
  • p. 193.
  • 12.
  • Key scientific findings of prime political relevance
  • p. 13.
  • p. 195.
  • 12.1.
  • The
  • general setting
  • p. 195.
  • 12.2.
  • The
  • story of global warming told to politicians, stakeholders and the public
  • p. 196.
  • 12.3.
  • Part I.
  • 3.
  • Impacts and adaptation
  • p. 210.
  • 12.4.
  • Science, media and the general public
  • p. 211.
  • 13.
  • Climate change and a future sustainable global energy supply
  • p. 214.
  • 13.1.
  • Delayed action in spite of trustworthy scientific assessments
  • Global research initiatives in meteorology and climatology
  • p. 214.
  • 13.2.
  • Past and future emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols
  • p. 215.
  • 13.3.
  • Primary energy reserves and resources and their utilisation
  • p. 224.
  • 13.4.
  • The
  • supply of energy under the constraints of minimising climate change
  • p. 19.
  • p. 233.
  • 13.5.
  • The
  • need for a multidimensional approach
  • p. 238.
  • 13.6.
  • The
  • economy of a transition to a sustainable energy supply system
  • p. 242.
  • 13.7.
  • 3.1.
  • Politics of securing a global sustainable energy supply system
  • p. 245
  • Building scientific networks
  • p. 19.
  • 3.2.
  • Concern for the environment reaches the political agenda
  • p. 17.
  • 3.3.
  • The
  • The
  • Global Atmospheric Research Programme becomes engaged in the climate issue
  • p. 28.
  • 4.
  • Early international assessments of climate change
  • p. 33.
  • 4.1.
  • Initiation of assessments aimed at politicians and society
  • p. 33.
  • Part II.
  • early history of the climate change issue
  • The
  • climate change issue becomes one of global concern
  • p. 41.
  • 5.1.
  • The
  • report by the UN Commission on Environment and Development
  • p. 43.
  • 5.2.
  • How to create a forum for interactions between science and politics
  • p. 45.
  • p. 1.
  • 5.3.
  • The
  • IPCC is formed and a first assessment is begun
  • p. 49.
  • 6.
  • The
  • scientific basis for a climate convention
  • p. 53.
  • 6.1.
  • Work begins
  • 1.
  • p. 53.
  • 6.2.
  • Politicians are anxious to show their concern for the environment
  • p. 56.
  • 6.3.
  • The
  • IPCC works towards the completion of the First Assessment Report
  • p. 61.
  • 6.4.
  • The
  • Nineteenth-century discoveries
  • acceptance and approval of the IPCC First Assessment Report
  • p. 67.
  • 6.5.
  • Scientific input in the negotiations about a framework convention
  • p. 68.
  • 6.6.
  • What has experience so far to say about the role of science?
  • p. 77.
  • 7.
  • Serving the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee
  • p. 3.
  • p. 79.
  • 7.1.
  • Changes in the IPCC structure and new members of the Bureau
  • p. 79.
  • 7.2.
  • Cooperation with the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee
  • p. 85.
  • 7.3.
  • Predictions or scenarios of future changes of the global climate?
  • p. 87.
  • 2.
  • 7.4.
  • Attempting to put Article 2 of the Climate Convention into focus
  • p. 93.
  • 7.5.
  • Equity and social considerations
  • p. 94.
  • 7.6.
  • Growing awareness of climate change and polarisation of opinions
  • p. 97.
  • 7.7.
Control code
154682307
Dimensions
26 cm
Extent
xiii, 277 pages
Isbn
9780521880824
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Lccn
2008271015
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)154682307

Library Locations

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