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The Resource Adversarial versus inquisitorial justice : psychological perspectives on criminal justice systems, edited by Peter J. van Koppen and Steven D. Penrod

Adversarial versus inquisitorial justice : psychological perspectives on criminal justice systems, edited by Peter J. van Koppen and Steven D. Penrod

Label
Adversarial versus inquisitorial justice : psychological perspectives on criminal justice systems
Title
Adversarial versus inquisitorial justice
Title remainder
psychological perspectives on criminal justice systems
Statement of responsibility
edited by Peter J. van Koppen and Steven D. Penrod
Title variation
Psychological perspectives on criminal justice systems
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This is the first volume that directly compares the practices of adversarial and inquisitorial systems of law from a psychological perspective. It aims at understanding why American and European continental systems differ so much, while both systems entertain much support in their communities. In the chapters it is demonstrated how the different systems chose different solutions for many of the same problems and how the solutions are related to the typical characteristics of the adversarial and the inquisitorial systems of criminal law. Particular emphasis is placed on problems addressed by psychological researchers and practitioners in the two systems. Chapters cover topics including: police investigative techniques, risk assessment, the death penalty, recovered memories, child witnesses, line-up practices, expert witnesses, trial procedures, and lay versus judge decision making. The book is written for advanced audiences in psychology and law
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
Index
index present
LC call number
HV7419
LC item number
.A384 2003
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Koppen, P. J. van
  • Penrod, Steven
Series statement
Perspectives in law & psychology
Series volume
v. 17
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Criminal justice, Administration of
  • Criminal investigation
  • Judicial process
Label
Adversarial versus inquisitorial justice : psychological perspectives on criminal justice systems, edited by Peter J. van Koppen and Steven D. Penrod
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 369-405) and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • The
  • What Does It Mean When You Say That Recovered Memories Are Essentially Accurate?
  • p. 121.
  • Professional Attitudes
  • p. 125.
  • Mounting the Witness Stand
  • p. 126.
  • Clinical versus Judicial Decision-Making
  • p. 127.
  • Chapter 9.
  • Adversarial Influences on the Interrogation of Trial Witnesses
  • Lives and Times of a Dutch and an American Suspect
  • Roger C. Park
  • p. 131.
  • Precepts of Contemporary Cross-Examination
  • p. 132.
  • Exceptions to the Low-Risk Precepts
  • p. 142.
  • Comparison of Adversarial and Inquisitorial Incentives
  • p. 143.
  • When Can Adversarial Cross-Examination Elicit New Facts?
  • p. 145.
  • p. 6.
  • Prophylactic Effect of Cross-Examination in Deterring Deception
  • p. 160.
  • Caveat: Other Benefits of Cross-Examination
  • p. 163.
  • The
  • Costs and Harms of Cross-Examination
  • p. 163.
  • Caveat: Trial Cross-Examination in the Context of Associated Procedures
  • p. 165.
  • Closing Comment
  • Which System Is Better?
  • p. 166.
  • Chapter 10.
  • Children in Court
  • Ingrid M. Cordon, Gail S. Goodman, Stacey J. Anderson
  • p. 167.
  • Background on Assumptions of the Adversarial System
  • p. 168.
  • Children's Knowledge of the Court
  • p. 169.
  • Children's Understanding of Legal Terminology
  • p. 15.
  • p. 170.
  • Competence Examinations
  • p. 173.
  • Direct-Examination and Cross-Examination
  • p. 175.
  • Children's Ability to Cope Emotionally
  • p. 177.
  • Emotional Effects of Children's Courtroom Experiences
  • p. 179.
  • Alternative Methods for Obtaining and Admitting Children's Evidence
  • Chapter 2.
  • p. 180.
  • Chapter 11.
  • Identification Evidence in Germany and the United States: Common Sense Assumptions, Empirical Evidence, Guidelines, and Judicial Practices
  • Siegfried L. Sporer, Brian L. Cutler
  • p. 191.
  • Identification Evidence in the German Legal Literature: From Past to the Present
  • p. 192.
  • Procedural Rules and Recommendations for Lineups in Germany
  • p. 194.
  • German Supreme Court Decisions
  • Adversarial or Inquisitorial: Do We Have a Choice?
  • p. 197.
  • Identification Procedures in the United States
  • p. 201.
  • Chapter 12.
  • Expert Evidence: The State of the Law in the Netherlands and the United States
  • Petra T.C. van Kampen
  • p. 209.
  • Securing Expert Assistance
  • p. 211.
  • The
  • Hans F.M. Crombag
  • Rules of Discovery
  • p. 216.
  • Admissibility and Decision Rules on Expert Evidence
  • p. 220.
  • The
  • Right to Confrontation
  • p. 226.
  • The
  • Right to Compulsory Process
  • p. 231.
  • p. 21.
  • Expert Evidence in the Netherlands and the United States: Different Shades of Gray
  • p. 233.
  • Chapter 13.
  • Expert Witnesses in Europe and the United States
  • Michael J. Saks
  • p. 235.
  • Preliminary Considerations
  • p. 235.
  • The
  • Adversarial System: In Theory and In Practice
  • Chapter 3.
  • p. 236.
  • The
  • Civil Law System: In Theory and In Practice
  • p. 240.
  • Chapter 14.
  • The
  • Role of the Forensic Expert in an Inquisitorial System
  • Ton Broeders
  • p. 245.
  • Written Reports
  • Chapter 1.
  • An
  • p. 246.
  • Evaluation of Forensic Evidence
  • p. 247.
  • Quality Assurance
  • p. 248.
  • Limitations of Quality Assurance
  • p. 248.
  • Independent Experts, Partisan Experts, and Hired Guns
  • p. 250.
  • Recent Developments: DNA, the European Court of Human Rights
  • Empirically Based Comparison of American and European Regulatory Approaches to Police Investigation
  • p. 252.
  • Chapter 15.
  • Psychological Expert Witnesses in Germany and the Netherlands
  • Claudia Knornschild, Peter J. van Koppen
  • p. 255.
  • Diversity within Unity
  • p. 255.
  • Forensic Psychological Assessment
  • p. 257.
  • Restriction to Credibility Assessment
  • Christopher Slobogin
  • p. 258.
  • Appointment of an Expert Witness
  • p. 258.
  • Ordering a Credibility Assessment
  • p. 260.
  • The
  • Instructions to Psychological Experts
  • p. 262.
  • Conducting a Credibility Assessment
  • p. 262.
  • p. 27.
  • The
  • Main Hearing
  • p. 269.
  • The
  • Quality of the Assessments
  • p. 274.
  • Chapter 16.
  • Preventing Bad Psychological Scientific Evidence in the Netherlands and the United States
  • Peter J. van Koppen, Michael J. Saks
  • p. 283.
  • Search and Seizure
  • Two Prostitutes and Their Pimp
  • p. 283.
  • Evidence for Courts and Juries
  • p. 284.
  • The
  • Standards for Expert Witnesses
  • p. 286.
  • Psychologists versus Forensic Psychologists
  • p. 287.
  • The
  • p. 28.
  • Expertise of the Psychologist
  • p. 290.
  • Methods for Evaluating Witness Statements
  • p. 293.
  • Protecting Courts against CBCA
  • p. 294.
  • Experts and Counter Experts
  • p. 298.
  • Standards for Expert Psychologists
  • p. 304.
  • Interrogation
  • Chapter 17.
  • Styles of Trial Procedure at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia
  • Francis J. Pakes
  • p. 309.
  • Characteristics of the ICTY
  • p. 311.
  • The
  • Performance of the Tribunal
  • p. 312.
  • Chapter 18.
  • p. 40.
  • Convergence and Complementarity between Professional Judges and Lay Adjudicators
  • Shari Seidman Diamond
  • p. 321.
  • Through the Eyes of the Judge
  • p. 322.
  • Agreement and Disagreement between LayPersons and Professional Judges
  • p. 325.
  • Beyond Agreement: Other Jury Attributes
  • p. 328.
  • Chapter 19.
  • Chapter 4.
  • The
  • Principle of Open Justice in the Netherlands
  • Ruth Hoekstra, Marijke Malsch
  • p. 333.
  • Side-Effects of Open Justice
  • p. 334.
  • Transparency of Criminal Process: The Right of Access to the Documents in a Case
  • p. 335.
  • Public Hearing
  • p. 338.
  • "We Will Protect Your Wife and Child, but Only If You Confess": Police Interrogations in England and the Netherlands
  • The
  • Principle of Immediacy
  • p. 339.
  • The
  • News Media versus the Public Gallery
  • p. 341.
  • Study on the Public Gallery
  • p. 342.
  • Chapter 20.
  • The
  • Adversarial or Inquisitorial: Comparing Systems
  • Aldert Vrij
  • John Wayne and Judge Dee Versions of Justice
  • Peter J. van Koppen, Steven D. Penrod
  • p. 347.
  • Different Forms of Justice?
  • p. 348.
  • The
  • Compromising Society
  • p. 349.
  • The
  • Judge Dee Model of Justice
  • p. 55.
  • p. 351.
  • The
  • Contending Society
  • p. 351.
  • The
  • Criminal Justice Systems
  • p. 354.
  • Pretrial
  • p. 355.
  • At Trial
  • Attitude Change in the Interrogation Room
  • p. 357
  • p. 57.
  • Interviewing Suspects in England
  • p. 59.
  • Reasons to Confess
  • p. 59.
  • Quality of the Interview
  • p. 63.
  • Peter J. van Koppen, Steven D. Penrod
  • Search for the Truth
  • p. 63.
  • Open-mindedness
  • p. 64.
  • Fair Interviewing and the Use of Tactics
  • p. 66.
  • The
  • Presence of an Appropriate Adult
  • p. 67.
  • The
  • p. 1.
  • Presence of a Legal Adviser
  • p. 69.
  • Interviewing Suspects in the Netherlands
  • p. 70.
  • Chapter 5.
  • Violence Risk Assessment in American Law
  • John Monahan
  • p. 81.
  • State of the Science
  • p. 82.
  • Comparing Systems
  • State of the Law
  • p. 85.
  • Chapter 6.
  • The
  • Dual Nature of Forensic Psychiatric Practice: Risk Assessment and Management under the Dutch TBS-Order
  • Corine De Ruiter, Martin Hildebrand
  • p. 91.
  • Juridical Framework
  • p. 92.
  • Competence to Stand Trial
  • p. 2.
  • p. 95.
  • The
  • Diminished Responsibility Doctrine
  • p. 96.
  • Psychiatric Disorders in TBS Patients
  • p. 98.
  • Treatment under the TBS Order
  • p. 99.
  • Violence Risk Assessment and Management under the TBS Order
  • p. 103.
  • Dutch Inquisition and American Adversaries
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • p. 105.
  • Chapter 7.
  • The
  • Death Penalty and Adversarial Justice in the United States
  • Samuel R. Gross
  • p. 107.
  • Inadequate Resources for Legal Representation
  • p. 108.
  • Arbitariness and Discrimination
  • p. 5.
  • p. 110.
  • Errors
  • p. 113.
  • Chapter 8.
  • Taking Recovered Memories to Court
  • Harald Merckelbach
  • p. 119.
  • A
  • Prototypical Case
  • p. 120.
Control code
50684757
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
x, 437 pages
Isbn
9780306473623
Lccn
2002034115
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Label
Adversarial versus inquisitorial justice : psychological perspectives on criminal justice systems, edited by Peter J. van Koppen and Steven D. Penrod
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 369-405) and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • The
  • What Does It Mean When You Say That Recovered Memories Are Essentially Accurate?
  • p. 121.
  • Professional Attitudes
  • p. 125.
  • Mounting the Witness Stand
  • p. 126.
  • Clinical versus Judicial Decision-Making
  • p. 127.
  • Chapter 9.
  • Adversarial Influences on the Interrogation of Trial Witnesses
  • Lives and Times of a Dutch and an American Suspect
  • Roger C. Park
  • p. 131.
  • Precepts of Contemporary Cross-Examination
  • p. 132.
  • Exceptions to the Low-Risk Precepts
  • p. 142.
  • Comparison of Adversarial and Inquisitorial Incentives
  • p. 143.
  • When Can Adversarial Cross-Examination Elicit New Facts?
  • p. 145.
  • p. 6.
  • Prophylactic Effect of Cross-Examination in Deterring Deception
  • p. 160.
  • Caveat: Other Benefits of Cross-Examination
  • p. 163.
  • The
  • Costs and Harms of Cross-Examination
  • p. 163.
  • Caveat: Trial Cross-Examination in the Context of Associated Procedures
  • p. 165.
  • Closing Comment
  • Which System Is Better?
  • p. 166.
  • Chapter 10.
  • Children in Court
  • Ingrid M. Cordon, Gail S. Goodman, Stacey J. Anderson
  • p. 167.
  • Background on Assumptions of the Adversarial System
  • p. 168.
  • Children's Knowledge of the Court
  • p. 169.
  • Children's Understanding of Legal Terminology
  • p. 15.
  • p. 170.
  • Competence Examinations
  • p. 173.
  • Direct-Examination and Cross-Examination
  • p. 175.
  • Children's Ability to Cope Emotionally
  • p. 177.
  • Emotional Effects of Children's Courtroom Experiences
  • p. 179.
  • Alternative Methods for Obtaining and Admitting Children's Evidence
  • Chapter 2.
  • p. 180.
  • Chapter 11.
  • Identification Evidence in Germany and the United States: Common Sense Assumptions, Empirical Evidence, Guidelines, and Judicial Practices
  • Siegfried L. Sporer, Brian L. Cutler
  • p. 191.
  • Identification Evidence in the German Legal Literature: From Past to the Present
  • p. 192.
  • Procedural Rules and Recommendations for Lineups in Germany
  • p. 194.
  • German Supreme Court Decisions
  • Adversarial or Inquisitorial: Do We Have a Choice?
  • p. 197.
  • Identification Procedures in the United States
  • p. 201.
  • Chapter 12.
  • Expert Evidence: The State of the Law in the Netherlands and the United States
  • Petra T.C. van Kampen
  • p. 209.
  • Securing Expert Assistance
  • p. 211.
  • The
  • Hans F.M. Crombag
  • Rules of Discovery
  • p. 216.
  • Admissibility and Decision Rules on Expert Evidence
  • p. 220.
  • The
  • Right to Confrontation
  • p. 226.
  • The
  • Right to Compulsory Process
  • p. 231.
  • p. 21.
  • Expert Evidence in the Netherlands and the United States: Different Shades of Gray
  • p. 233.
  • Chapter 13.
  • Expert Witnesses in Europe and the United States
  • Michael J. Saks
  • p. 235.
  • Preliminary Considerations
  • p. 235.
  • The
  • Adversarial System: In Theory and In Practice
  • Chapter 3.
  • p. 236.
  • The
  • Civil Law System: In Theory and In Practice
  • p. 240.
  • Chapter 14.
  • The
  • Role of the Forensic Expert in an Inquisitorial System
  • Ton Broeders
  • p. 245.
  • Written Reports
  • Chapter 1.
  • An
  • p. 246.
  • Evaluation of Forensic Evidence
  • p. 247.
  • Quality Assurance
  • p. 248.
  • Limitations of Quality Assurance
  • p. 248.
  • Independent Experts, Partisan Experts, and Hired Guns
  • p. 250.
  • Recent Developments: DNA, the European Court of Human Rights
  • Empirically Based Comparison of American and European Regulatory Approaches to Police Investigation
  • p. 252.
  • Chapter 15.
  • Psychological Expert Witnesses in Germany and the Netherlands
  • Claudia Knornschild, Peter J. van Koppen
  • p. 255.
  • Diversity within Unity
  • p. 255.
  • Forensic Psychological Assessment
  • p. 257.
  • Restriction to Credibility Assessment
  • Christopher Slobogin
  • p. 258.
  • Appointment of an Expert Witness
  • p. 258.
  • Ordering a Credibility Assessment
  • p. 260.
  • The
  • Instructions to Psychological Experts
  • p. 262.
  • Conducting a Credibility Assessment
  • p. 262.
  • p. 27.
  • The
  • Main Hearing
  • p. 269.
  • The
  • Quality of the Assessments
  • p. 274.
  • Chapter 16.
  • Preventing Bad Psychological Scientific Evidence in the Netherlands and the United States
  • Peter J. van Koppen, Michael J. Saks
  • p. 283.
  • Search and Seizure
  • Two Prostitutes and Their Pimp
  • p. 283.
  • Evidence for Courts and Juries
  • p. 284.
  • The
  • Standards for Expert Witnesses
  • p. 286.
  • Psychologists versus Forensic Psychologists
  • p. 287.
  • The
  • p. 28.
  • Expertise of the Psychologist
  • p. 290.
  • Methods for Evaluating Witness Statements
  • p. 293.
  • Protecting Courts against CBCA
  • p. 294.
  • Experts and Counter Experts
  • p. 298.
  • Standards for Expert Psychologists
  • p. 304.
  • Interrogation
  • Chapter 17.
  • Styles of Trial Procedure at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia
  • Francis J. Pakes
  • p. 309.
  • Characteristics of the ICTY
  • p. 311.
  • The
  • Performance of the Tribunal
  • p. 312.
  • Chapter 18.
  • p. 40.
  • Convergence and Complementarity between Professional Judges and Lay Adjudicators
  • Shari Seidman Diamond
  • p. 321.
  • Through the Eyes of the Judge
  • p. 322.
  • Agreement and Disagreement between LayPersons and Professional Judges
  • p. 325.
  • Beyond Agreement: Other Jury Attributes
  • p. 328.
  • Chapter 19.
  • Chapter 4.
  • The
  • Principle of Open Justice in the Netherlands
  • Ruth Hoekstra, Marijke Malsch
  • p. 333.
  • Side-Effects of Open Justice
  • p. 334.
  • Transparency of Criminal Process: The Right of Access to the Documents in a Case
  • p. 335.
  • Public Hearing
  • p. 338.
  • "We Will Protect Your Wife and Child, but Only If You Confess": Police Interrogations in England and the Netherlands
  • The
  • Principle of Immediacy
  • p. 339.
  • The
  • News Media versus the Public Gallery
  • p. 341.
  • Study on the Public Gallery
  • p. 342.
  • Chapter 20.
  • The
  • Adversarial or Inquisitorial: Comparing Systems
  • Aldert Vrij
  • John Wayne and Judge Dee Versions of Justice
  • Peter J. van Koppen, Steven D. Penrod
  • p. 347.
  • Different Forms of Justice?
  • p. 348.
  • The
  • Compromising Society
  • p. 349.
  • The
  • Judge Dee Model of Justice
  • p. 55.
  • p. 351.
  • The
  • Contending Society
  • p. 351.
  • The
  • Criminal Justice Systems
  • p. 354.
  • Pretrial
  • p. 355.
  • At Trial
  • Attitude Change in the Interrogation Room
  • p. 357
  • p. 57.
  • Interviewing Suspects in England
  • p. 59.
  • Reasons to Confess
  • p. 59.
  • Quality of the Interview
  • p. 63.
  • Peter J. van Koppen, Steven D. Penrod
  • Search for the Truth
  • p. 63.
  • Open-mindedness
  • p. 64.
  • Fair Interviewing and the Use of Tactics
  • p. 66.
  • The
  • Presence of an Appropriate Adult
  • p. 67.
  • The
  • p. 1.
  • Presence of a Legal Adviser
  • p. 69.
  • Interviewing Suspects in the Netherlands
  • p. 70.
  • Chapter 5.
  • Violence Risk Assessment in American Law
  • John Monahan
  • p. 81.
  • State of the Science
  • p. 82.
  • Comparing Systems
  • State of the Law
  • p. 85.
  • Chapter 6.
  • The
  • Dual Nature of Forensic Psychiatric Practice: Risk Assessment and Management under the Dutch TBS-Order
  • Corine De Ruiter, Martin Hildebrand
  • p. 91.
  • Juridical Framework
  • p. 92.
  • Competence to Stand Trial
  • p. 2.
  • p. 95.
  • The
  • Diminished Responsibility Doctrine
  • p. 96.
  • Psychiatric Disorders in TBS Patients
  • p. 98.
  • Treatment under the TBS Order
  • p. 99.
  • Violence Risk Assessment and Management under the TBS Order
  • p. 103.
  • Dutch Inquisition and American Adversaries
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • p. 105.
  • Chapter 7.
  • The
  • Death Penalty and Adversarial Justice in the United States
  • Samuel R. Gross
  • p. 107.
  • Inadequate Resources for Legal Representation
  • p. 108.
  • Arbitariness and Discrimination
  • p. 5.
  • p. 110.
  • Errors
  • p. 113.
  • Chapter 8.
  • Taking Recovered Memories to Court
  • Harald Merckelbach
  • p. 119.
  • A
  • Prototypical Case
  • p. 120.
Control code
50684757
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
x, 437 pages
Isbn
9780306473623
Lccn
2002034115
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n

Library Locations

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      5998 Alcalá Park, San Diego, CA, 92110-2492, US
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