Coverart for item
The Resource Biotech patents : equivalence and exclusions under European and U.S. patent law, Li Westerlund

Biotech patents : equivalence and exclusions under European and U.S. patent law, Li Westerlund

Label
Biotech patents : equivalence and exclusions under European and U.S. patent law
Title
Biotech patents
Title remainder
equivalence and exclusions under European and U.S. patent law
Statement of responsibility
Li Westerlund
Title variation
Equivalence and exclusions under European and U.S. patent law
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1967-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Westerlund, Li
Index
no index present
LC call number
K1519.B54
LC item number
W47 2002
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Patent laws and legislation
  • Patent laws and legislation
  • Biotechnology industries
  • Biotechnology industries
Label
Biotech patents : equivalence and exclusions under European and U.S. patent law, Li Westerlund
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • p. 5.
  • 2.3.
  • Analysis
  • p. 35.
  • 2.3.1.
  • Challenge of Traditional Concepts
  • p. 35.
  • 2.3.2.
  • A
  • Technical Solution (I)
  • p. 36.
  • 1.3.1.
  • 2.3.3.
  • The
  • Utilisaton of Natural Forces (II)
  • p. 38.
  • 2.3.4.
  • The
  • Inventive Kernel
  • p. 40.
  • 2.3.5.
  • Existing in Nature
  • The
  • p. 42.
  • 2.3.6.
  • The
  • Human Body and Parts of the Human Body
  • p. 45.
  • 2.3.7.
  • Not Freely Occurring in Nature
  • p. 47.
  • 2.3.8.
  • Modifications at the Molecular Level
  • Basic Patentability Criteria
  • p. 48.
  • 2.3.9.
  • The
  • Necessity of Human Intervention
  • p. 49.
  • 2.3.10.
  • The
  • Result of Human Intelligence
  • p. 50.
  • 2.4.
  • p. 6.
  • Patentability Problems
  • p. 52.
  • 2.4.1.
  • Patentable Subject Matter
  • p. 53.
  • 2.4.2.
  • An
  • Exclusive Right to Exploit
  • p. 53.
  • 2.4.3.
  • 1.3.2.
  • Production or Business Purpose
  • p. 56.
  • 3.
  • Disclosure
  • p. 59.
  • 3.1.
  • Functions of Disclosure
  • p. 60.
  • 3.1.1.
  • Disclosing Inventions
  • Genetic Engineering
  • p. 62.
  • 3.1.2.
  • Identity of Invention
  • p. 63.
  • 3.2.
  • The
  • EPC
  • p. 63.
  • 3.2.1.
  • Art. 83 EPC-Art. 84 EPC
  • p. 7.
  • p. 64.
  • 3.2.2.
  • Disclosure and Scope of Claims
  • p. 65.
  • 3.2.2.1.
  • Indentity of Invention
  • p. 68.
  • 3.2.2.2.
  • Complex Technology
  • p. 68.
  • 1.4.
  • 3.2.2.3.
  • Disclosed Indentity
  • p. 71.
  • 3.2.2.4.
  • Identity Determination
  • p. 72.
  • 3.2.3.
  • One Way to Carry out the Invention
  • p. 73.
  • 3.2.3.1.
  • Incentive to Invent
  • Proper Balance
  • p. 75.
  • 3.2.3.2.
  • Rule of Presumption
  • p. 75.
  • 3.2.4.
  • Not a Fixed Rule
  • p. 77.
  • 3.2.4.1.
  • Serious Doubts
  • 1.1.
  • p. 9.
  • p. 77.
  • 3.2.4.2.
  • Reversal of Proof
  • p. 78.
  • 3.2.5.
  • Undue Burden of Experimentation
  • p. 79.
  • 3.2.5.1.
  • Identical Results
  • p. 80.
  • 1.4.1.
  • 3.2.5.2.
  • Repeatability of Examples
  • p. 81.
  • 3.2.5.3.
  • Breadth of Claims
  • p. 82.
  • 3.2.5.4.
  • Reproductability
  • p. 84.
  • 3.2.6.
  • Economics
  • Sufficiently Disclosed
  • p. 86.
  • 3.2.6.1.
  • The
  • British Approach
  • p. 87.
  • 3.2.6.2.
  • Practical Use
  • p. 89.
  • 3.2.6.3.
  • p. 10.
  • Quid Pro Quo
  • p. 91.
  • 3.3.
  • U.S. Patent Law
  • p. 92.
  • 3.3.1.
  • Utility
  • p. 93.
  • 3.3.1.1.
  • The
  • 1.4.2.
  • EST Issue
  • p. 96.
  • 3.3.1.2.
  • Partial Remedy for Overly Broad Claims
  • p. 97.
  • 3.3.1.3.
  • Change in View
  • p. 98.
  • 3.3.2.
  • Factual Proof
  • Intangible Content
  • p. 99.
  • 3.3.2.1.
  • The
  • Biotechnological Field
  • p. 101.
  • 3.3.2.2.
  • The
  • USPTO Guideline
  • p. 102.
  • 3.3.3.
  • p. 11.
  • Enablement
  • p. 105.
  • 3.3.3.1.
  • Undue Burden of Experimentation
  • p. 106.
  • 3.3.3.2.
  • Step-by-Step Method
  • p. 108.
  • 3.3.3.3.
  • Effect Achieved Later On
  • 1.4.3.
  • p. 110.
  • 3.3.4.
  • Technological Complexity
  • p. 112.
  • 3.3.4.1.
  • Potential Rejection
  • p. 114.
  • 3.3.4.2.
  • Broad Claims
  • p. 115.
  • Drawbacks
  • 3.3.4.3.
  • Factual Proof of Enablement
  • p. 117.
  • 3.3.4.4.
  • Complex Biological Phenomena
  • p. 118.
  • 3.3.5.
  • Strict Interpretation
  • p. 124.
  • 3.4.
  • p. 12.
  • Concluding Remarks on Disclosure
  • p. 126.
  • 3.4.1.
  • Early Filing
  • p. 127.
  • 3.4.2.
  • Required Use
  • p. 129.
  • 3.4.3.
  • Claim Drafting
  • Patents to Life Forms
  • 1.5.
  • p. 130.
  • 3.4.4.
  • Comparative Aspects
  • p. 131.
  • 3.4.5.
  • Scope of Claims
  • p. 132.
  • 3.4.6.
  • Scope of Protection the Main Issue
  • p. 135.
  • Complex Legal Situation
  • 4.
  • Protection
  • p. 137.
  • 4.1.
  • Literal Infringement-British Law
  • p. 139.
  • 4.2.
  • German Law
  • p. 141.
  • 4.3.
  • p. 13.
  • The
  • U.S. Practice
  • p. 142.
  • 4.3.1.
  • Literal Protection
  • p. 145.
  • 4.3.2.
  • Claim Limitations
  • p. 147.
  • 4.3.3.
  • 1.5.1.
  • Literal Protection
  • p. 148.
  • 5.
  • Equivalency
  • p. 151.
  • 5.1.
  • British Practice
  • p. 152.
  • 5.1.1.
  • Purposive Construction
  • Invention
  • p. 154.
  • 5.1.1.1.
  • Claim Construction
  • p. 156.
  • 5.1.1.2.
  • Threshold Test
  • p. 157.
  • 5.1.1.3.
  • Material Effect
  • p. 159.
  • p. 15.
  • 5.1.1.4.
  • After-Developed Technology
  • p. 159.
  • 5.1.2.
  • The
  • EPC-Requirements
  • p. 161.
  • 5.1.2.1.
  • Claim Limitations
  • p. 163.
  • 1.5.2.
  • 5.1.2.2.
  • Harmonisation
  • p. 165.
  • 5.1.2.3.
  • The
  • 'New' Approach
  • p. 167.
  • 5.1.2.4.
  • Application of Equivalents
  • p. 170.
  • Exclusions from Patentability
  • 5.2.
  • German Practice
  • p. 171.
  • 5.2.1.
  • Doctrine of Equivalents
  • p. 172.
  • 5.2.1.1.
  • Indirect Equivalency
  • p. 174.
  • 5.2.1.2.
  • p. 16.
  • Obviousness
  • p. 175.
  • 5.2.2.
  • Chemical and Biochemical Patents
  • p. 176.
  • 5.2.2.1.
  • Disclosure as Basis
  • p. 178.
  • 5.2.2.2.
  • Claim Limitations
  • 1.6.
  • p. 179.
  • 5.2.3.
  • Harmonisation
  • p. 182.
  • 5.2.3.1.
  • The
  • New Practice
  • p. 184.
  • 5.3.
  • European Harmonisation
  • p. 1.
  • Proper Balance
  • p. 187.
  • 5.3.1.
  • Different Outcomes
  • p. 188.
  • 5.3.2.
  • The
  • EC Directive
  • p. 188.
  • 5.3.3.
  • Translucent Approach
  • p. 16.
  • p. 190.
  • 5.4.
  • U.S. Practice
  • p. 193.
  • 5.4.1.
  • Equivalent Changes
  • p. 194.
  • 5.4.2.
  • Biochemical Inventions
  • p. 196.
  • 1.6.1.
  • 5.4.3.
  • Biotechnological Inventions
  • p. 199.
  • 5.4.3.1.
  • Case Law
  • p. 202.
  • 5.4.3.2.
  • Claim Litigation
  • p. 205.
  • 5.4.4.
  • The
  • Standard of Difference
  • p. 206.
  • 5.4.4.1.
  • Element-by-Element
  • p. 207.
  • 5.4.4.2.
  • The
  • FWR Test and Standard of Differences
  • p. 211.
  • 5.4.5.
  • Complex Picture Behind the Patent Systems
  • Functional Claim Language
  • p. 213.
  • 5.4.6.
  • De Novo Claim Construction
  • p. 215.
  • 5.4.7.
  • Restrictions of the Doctrine
  • p. 217.
  • 5.4.7.1.
  • Freely Usable State of the Art
  • p. 17.
  • p. 219.
  • 5.4.8.1.
  • Basis
  • p. 222.
  • 5.5.
  • Summarising Remarks
  • p. 223.
  • 5.5.1.
  • Different Policies
  • p. 225.
  • 1.6.2.
  • 5.5.2.
  • Different Practicies
  • p. 228.
  • 5.5.2.1.
  • Uncertainty
  • p. 229.
  • 5.5.3.
  • Decisive Aspects for Infringement
  • p. 231.
  • 5.5.4.
  • Classical Methods of Assessing Patent Law
  • Element-By-Element Contra Invention-As-A-Whole
  • p. 232.
  • 5.5.4.1.
  • Point in Time
  • p. 234.
  • 5.5.5.
  • Comparative Conclusions
  • p. 236.
  • 6.
  • Exclusions from Patentability
  • p. 18.
  • p. 239.
  • 6.1.
  • The
  • Purpose
  • p. 240.
  • 6.1.1.
  • International Regulations
  • p. 240.
  • 6.1.2.
  • Europe
  • 1.6.3.
  • p. 242.
  • 6.2.
  • The
  • Concept of 'Plant Variety'
  • p. 245.
  • 6.2.1.
  • The
  • Regulation
  • p. 246.
  • 6.2.1.1.
  • 1.2.
  • Changes in Patent Practice Affect the Protection
  • The
  • Criteria
  • p. 248.
  • 6.2.2.
  • EPC Case Law
  • p. 251.
  • 6.2.2.1.
  • The
  • Interpretation
  • p. 254.
  • p. 19.
  • 6.2.2.2.
  • Questions Answered
  • p. 255.
  • 6.2.2.3.
  • Points of Interpretation Cleared
  • p. 257.
  • 6.2.2.4.
  • Proper Interpretation
  • p. 258.
  • 6.2.3.
  • 1.6.4.
  • A
  • Substantive Approach
  • p. 262.
  • 6.3.
  • Analysis
  • p. 264.
  • 6.3.1.
  • Protectable Varieties
  • p. 266.
  • 6.3.2.
  • Trade Secret and Copyright Protection
  • Technical Feasibility
  • p. 267.
  • 6.3.3.
  • Patent and Plant Breeder's Right Protection
  • p. 268.
  • 6.3.4.
  • Protectable Plant Variety
  • p. 270.
  • 6.3.4.1.
  • Accept the PBR Definition
  • p. 20.
  • p. 270.
  • 6.3.4.2.
  • Relevant Criteria
  • p. 272.
  • 6.3.5.
  • Clarification by the EC Directive
  • p. 274.
  • 6.3.6.
  • Scope of Protection
  • p. 276.
  • 1.7.1.
  • 6.3.6.1.
  • Well-Balanced System
  • p. 277.
  • 6.3.6.2.
  • Weighting Pros and Cons
  • p. 278.
  • 6.4.
  • The
  • Concept of Animal Variety
  • p. 280.
  • Division
  • 6.4.1.
  • Legal Problems Specific to Animals
  • p. 283.
  • 6.4.1.1.
  • Unclear Concept
  • p. 284.
  • 6.4.2.
  • Proper Interpretation
  • p. 286.
  • 6.4.2.1.
  • p. 21.
  • Methods of Interpretation
  • p. 287.
  • 6.4.2.2.
  • Clarification
  • p. 288.
  • 6.4.3.
  • The
  • Purpose of Law
  • p. 290.
  • 6.4.3.1.
  • 1.7.2.
  • Analogous Application of the DUS Criteria
  • p. 291.
  • 6.5.
  • Other Ways to Protect Varieties (Excurs) US Law
  • p. 294.
  • 6.5.1.
  • U.S. Plant Protection
  • p. 294.
  • 6.5.2.
  • Patent Protection vs. Copyright Protection
  • Mode of Operation
  • p. 297.
  • 6.5.3.
  • A
  • Sui Generis System
  • p. 299.
  • 7.
  • Process Plants
  • p. 303.
  • 7.1.
  • Technical Character
  • International and Regional Legal Instruments
  • p. 22.
  • p. 304.
  • 7.1.1.
  • A
  • Higher Level of Technicality
  • p. 305.
  • 7.1.2.
  • Interpretation
  • p. 306.
  • 7.2.
  • Analysis
  • 2.
  • p. 308.
  • 7.2.1.
  • Technical Standard
  • p. 309.
  • 7.2.2.
  • Effect of End Product
  • p. 310.
  • 7.3.
  • Microbiological Processes and Their Products
  • p. 311.
  • Invention or Discovery
  • 7.3.1.
  • EPC Case Law
  • p. 311.
  • 7.3.2.
  • Method of Interpretation
  • p. 313.
  • 7.3.2.2.
  • Objective Technological Method
  • p. 316.
  • 7.4.
  • p. 23.
  • Analysing Remarks
  • p. 317.
  • 7.4.1.
  • Application
  • p. 318.
  • 8.
  • Overall Analysis
  • p. 321.
  • 8.1.
  • Analytical Framework
  • 2.1.
  • p. 322.
  • 8.1.1.
  • Defined Right
  • p. 322.
  • 8.2.
  • No Satisfactory Solution
  • p. 323.
  • 8.2.1.
  • Plant Variety
  • p. 324.
  • Invention
  • 8.2.1.1.
  • Standpoint of PBR Law
  • p. 325.
  • 8.2.1.2.
  • Alternative Legal Understanding
  • p. 326.
  • 8.2.2.
  • The
  • Animal Variety Concept
  • p. 328.
  • p. 24.
  • 8.2.2.1.
  • Shift in Perspective
  • p. 329.
  • 8.2.2.2.
  • Alternate Understanding
  • p. 329.
  • 8.2.3.
  • Essentially Biological Process
  • p. 331.
  • 8.2.3.1.
  • 2.1.1.
  • Comprehensive View
  • p. 332.
  • 8.2.4.
  • Microbiological Process
  • p. 332.
  • 8.3.
  • Intrinsic Incoherence
  • p. 333.
  • 8.3.1.
  • Historical Explanation
  • Legal Definition
  • p. 334.
  • 8.3.2.
  • Point of Departure
  • p. 336.
  • 8.3.2.1.
  • Available Protection
  • p. 337.
  • 8.3.2.2.
  • Double Protection
  • p. 338.
  • p. 25.
  • 8.3.2.3.
  • Cross- and Compulsory Licensing (Excurs)
  • p. 339.
  • 8.3.3.
  • Other Kinds of Protection (Excurs)
  • p. 341.
  • 8.4.
  • Predictable Basis
  • p. 343.
  • 8.4.1.
  • p. 4.
  • 2.1.2.
  • Rules of Interpretation
  • p. 344.
  • 8.4.2.
  • Different Solutions
  • p. 345
  • Invention as Opposed to Discovery
  • p. 25.
  • 2.2.1.
  • Typology
  • p. 26.
  • 2.2.2.
  • Natural-Technological Processes
  • p. 27.
  • 2.2.3.
  • 1.3.
  • Living Organisms- Products of Nature
  • p. 27.
  • 2.2.4.
  • No New Properties
  • p. 28.
  • 2.2.5.
  • Creation By Man
  • p. 28.
  • 2.2.6.
  • Technical Means- New Organisms
  • Eligibility
  • p. 29.
  • 2.2.7.
  • Living Organisms and Their Parts Patentable
  • p. 30.
  • 2.2.8.
  • Prepared in Non-Natural Forms
  • p. 32.
  • 2.2.9.
  • CDNA's are not 'Natural Products'
  • p. 33.
  • p. 349
  • 8.4.3.
  • Distinguishable Aspects
  • p. 346.
  • 8.4.4.
  • Range of Equivalents
  • p. 348.
  • 8.4.5.
  • Proper Basis
Control code
49225571
Dimensions
26 cm
Extent
x, 351 pages
Isbn
9789041188830
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2002020880
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Label
Biotech patents : equivalence and exclusions under European and U.S. patent law, Li Westerlund
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • p. 5.
  • 2.3.
  • Analysis
  • p. 35.
  • 2.3.1.
  • Challenge of Traditional Concepts
  • p. 35.
  • 2.3.2.
  • A
  • Technical Solution (I)
  • p. 36.
  • 1.3.1.
  • 2.3.3.
  • The
  • Utilisaton of Natural Forces (II)
  • p. 38.
  • 2.3.4.
  • The
  • Inventive Kernel
  • p. 40.
  • 2.3.5.
  • Existing in Nature
  • The
  • p. 42.
  • 2.3.6.
  • The
  • Human Body and Parts of the Human Body
  • p. 45.
  • 2.3.7.
  • Not Freely Occurring in Nature
  • p. 47.
  • 2.3.8.
  • Modifications at the Molecular Level
  • Basic Patentability Criteria
  • p. 48.
  • 2.3.9.
  • The
  • Necessity of Human Intervention
  • p. 49.
  • 2.3.10.
  • The
  • Result of Human Intelligence
  • p. 50.
  • 2.4.
  • p. 6.
  • Patentability Problems
  • p. 52.
  • 2.4.1.
  • Patentable Subject Matter
  • p. 53.
  • 2.4.2.
  • An
  • Exclusive Right to Exploit
  • p. 53.
  • 2.4.3.
  • 1.3.2.
  • Production or Business Purpose
  • p. 56.
  • 3.
  • Disclosure
  • p. 59.
  • 3.1.
  • Functions of Disclosure
  • p. 60.
  • 3.1.1.
  • Disclosing Inventions
  • Genetic Engineering
  • p. 62.
  • 3.1.2.
  • Identity of Invention
  • p. 63.
  • 3.2.
  • The
  • EPC
  • p. 63.
  • 3.2.1.
  • Art. 83 EPC-Art. 84 EPC
  • p. 7.
  • p. 64.
  • 3.2.2.
  • Disclosure and Scope of Claims
  • p. 65.
  • 3.2.2.1.
  • Indentity of Invention
  • p. 68.
  • 3.2.2.2.
  • Complex Technology
  • p. 68.
  • 1.4.
  • 3.2.2.3.
  • Disclosed Indentity
  • p. 71.
  • 3.2.2.4.
  • Identity Determination
  • p. 72.
  • 3.2.3.
  • One Way to Carry out the Invention
  • p. 73.
  • 3.2.3.1.
  • Incentive to Invent
  • Proper Balance
  • p. 75.
  • 3.2.3.2.
  • Rule of Presumption
  • p. 75.
  • 3.2.4.
  • Not a Fixed Rule
  • p. 77.
  • 3.2.4.1.
  • Serious Doubts
  • 1.1.
  • p. 9.
  • p. 77.
  • 3.2.4.2.
  • Reversal of Proof
  • p. 78.
  • 3.2.5.
  • Undue Burden of Experimentation
  • p. 79.
  • 3.2.5.1.
  • Identical Results
  • p. 80.
  • 1.4.1.
  • 3.2.5.2.
  • Repeatability of Examples
  • p. 81.
  • 3.2.5.3.
  • Breadth of Claims
  • p. 82.
  • 3.2.5.4.
  • Reproductability
  • p. 84.
  • 3.2.6.
  • Economics
  • Sufficiently Disclosed
  • p. 86.
  • 3.2.6.1.
  • The
  • British Approach
  • p. 87.
  • 3.2.6.2.
  • Practical Use
  • p. 89.
  • 3.2.6.3.
  • p. 10.
  • Quid Pro Quo
  • p. 91.
  • 3.3.
  • U.S. Patent Law
  • p. 92.
  • 3.3.1.
  • Utility
  • p. 93.
  • 3.3.1.1.
  • The
  • 1.4.2.
  • EST Issue
  • p. 96.
  • 3.3.1.2.
  • Partial Remedy for Overly Broad Claims
  • p. 97.
  • 3.3.1.3.
  • Change in View
  • p. 98.
  • 3.3.2.
  • Factual Proof
  • Intangible Content
  • p. 99.
  • 3.3.2.1.
  • The
  • Biotechnological Field
  • p. 101.
  • 3.3.2.2.
  • The
  • USPTO Guideline
  • p. 102.
  • 3.3.3.
  • p. 11.
  • Enablement
  • p. 105.
  • 3.3.3.1.
  • Undue Burden of Experimentation
  • p. 106.
  • 3.3.3.2.
  • Step-by-Step Method
  • p. 108.
  • 3.3.3.3.
  • Effect Achieved Later On
  • 1.4.3.
  • p. 110.
  • 3.3.4.
  • Technological Complexity
  • p. 112.
  • 3.3.4.1.
  • Potential Rejection
  • p. 114.
  • 3.3.4.2.
  • Broad Claims
  • p. 115.
  • Drawbacks
  • 3.3.4.3.
  • Factual Proof of Enablement
  • p. 117.
  • 3.3.4.4.
  • Complex Biological Phenomena
  • p. 118.
  • 3.3.5.
  • Strict Interpretation
  • p. 124.
  • 3.4.
  • p. 12.
  • Concluding Remarks on Disclosure
  • p. 126.
  • 3.4.1.
  • Early Filing
  • p. 127.
  • 3.4.2.
  • Required Use
  • p. 129.
  • 3.4.3.
  • Claim Drafting
  • Patents to Life Forms
  • 1.5.
  • p. 130.
  • 3.4.4.
  • Comparative Aspects
  • p. 131.
  • 3.4.5.
  • Scope of Claims
  • p. 132.
  • 3.4.6.
  • Scope of Protection the Main Issue
  • p. 135.
  • Complex Legal Situation
  • 4.
  • Protection
  • p. 137.
  • 4.1.
  • Literal Infringement-British Law
  • p. 139.
  • 4.2.
  • German Law
  • p. 141.
  • 4.3.
  • p. 13.
  • The
  • U.S. Practice
  • p. 142.
  • 4.3.1.
  • Literal Protection
  • p. 145.
  • 4.3.2.
  • Claim Limitations
  • p. 147.
  • 4.3.3.
  • 1.5.1.
  • Literal Protection
  • p. 148.
  • 5.
  • Equivalency
  • p. 151.
  • 5.1.
  • British Practice
  • p. 152.
  • 5.1.1.
  • Purposive Construction
  • Invention
  • p. 154.
  • 5.1.1.1.
  • Claim Construction
  • p. 156.
  • 5.1.1.2.
  • Threshold Test
  • p. 157.
  • 5.1.1.3.
  • Material Effect
  • p. 159.
  • p. 15.
  • 5.1.1.4.
  • After-Developed Technology
  • p. 159.
  • 5.1.2.
  • The
  • EPC-Requirements
  • p. 161.
  • 5.1.2.1.
  • Claim Limitations
  • p. 163.
  • 1.5.2.
  • 5.1.2.2.
  • Harmonisation
  • p. 165.
  • 5.1.2.3.
  • The
  • 'New' Approach
  • p. 167.
  • 5.1.2.4.
  • Application of Equivalents
  • p. 170.
  • Exclusions from Patentability
  • 5.2.
  • German Practice
  • p. 171.
  • 5.2.1.
  • Doctrine of Equivalents
  • p. 172.
  • 5.2.1.1.
  • Indirect Equivalency
  • p. 174.
  • 5.2.1.2.
  • p. 16.
  • Obviousness
  • p. 175.
  • 5.2.2.
  • Chemical and Biochemical Patents
  • p. 176.
  • 5.2.2.1.
  • Disclosure as Basis
  • p. 178.
  • 5.2.2.2.
  • Claim Limitations
  • 1.6.
  • p. 179.
  • 5.2.3.
  • Harmonisation
  • p. 182.
  • 5.2.3.1.
  • The
  • New Practice
  • p. 184.
  • 5.3.
  • European Harmonisation
  • p. 1.
  • Proper Balance
  • p. 187.
  • 5.3.1.
  • Different Outcomes
  • p. 188.
  • 5.3.2.
  • The
  • EC Directive
  • p. 188.
  • 5.3.3.
  • Translucent Approach
  • p. 16.
  • p. 190.
  • 5.4.
  • U.S. Practice
  • p. 193.
  • 5.4.1.
  • Equivalent Changes
  • p. 194.
  • 5.4.2.
  • Biochemical Inventions
  • p. 196.
  • 1.6.1.
  • 5.4.3.
  • Biotechnological Inventions
  • p. 199.
  • 5.4.3.1.
  • Case Law
  • p. 202.
  • 5.4.3.2.
  • Claim Litigation
  • p. 205.
  • 5.4.4.
  • The
  • Standard of Difference
  • p. 206.
  • 5.4.4.1.
  • Element-by-Element
  • p. 207.
  • 5.4.4.2.
  • The
  • FWR Test and Standard of Differences
  • p. 211.
  • 5.4.5.
  • Complex Picture Behind the Patent Systems
  • Functional Claim Language
  • p. 213.
  • 5.4.6.
  • De Novo Claim Construction
  • p. 215.
  • 5.4.7.
  • Restrictions of the Doctrine
  • p. 217.
  • 5.4.7.1.
  • Freely Usable State of the Art
  • p. 17.
  • p. 219.
  • 5.4.8.1.
  • Basis
  • p. 222.
  • 5.5.
  • Summarising Remarks
  • p. 223.
  • 5.5.1.
  • Different Policies
  • p. 225.
  • 1.6.2.
  • 5.5.2.
  • Different Practicies
  • p. 228.
  • 5.5.2.1.
  • Uncertainty
  • p. 229.
  • 5.5.3.
  • Decisive Aspects for Infringement
  • p. 231.
  • 5.5.4.
  • Classical Methods of Assessing Patent Law
  • Element-By-Element Contra Invention-As-A-Whole
  • p. 232.
  • 5.5.4.1.
  • Point in Time
  • p. 234.
  • 5.5.5.
  • Comparative Conclusions
  • p. 236.
  • 6.
  • Exclusions from Patentability
  • p. 18.
  • p. 239.
  • 6.1.
  • The
  • Purpose
  • p. 240.
  • 6.1.1.
  • International Regulations
  • p. 240.
  • 6.1.2.
  • Europe
  • 1.6.3.
  • p. 242.
  • 6.2.
  • The
  • Concept of 'Plant Variety'
  • p. 245.
  • 6.2.1.
  • The
  • Regulation
  • p. 246.
  • 6.2.1.1.
  • 1.2.
  • Changes in Patent Practice Affect the Protection
  • The
  • Criteria
  • p. 248.
  • 6.2.2.
  • EPC Case Law
  • p. 251.
  • 6.2.2.1.
  • The
  • Interpretation
  • p. 254.
  • p. 19.
  • 6.2.2.2.
  • Questions Answered
  • p. 255.
  • 6.2.2.3.
  • Points of Interpretation Cleared
  • p. 257.
  • 6.2.2.4.
  • Proper Interpretation
  • p. 258.
  • 6.2.3.
  • 1.6.4.
  • A
  • Substantive Approach
  • p. 262.
  • 6.3.
  • Analysis
  • p. 264.
  • 6.3.1.
  • Protectable Varieties
  • p. 266.
  • 6.3.2.
  • Trade Secret and Copyright Protection
  • Technical Feasibility
  • p. 267.
  • 6.3.3.
  • Patent and Plant Breeder's Right Protection
  • p. 268.
  • 6.3.4.
  • Protectable Plant Variety
  • p. 270.
  • 6.3.4.1.
  • Accept the PBR Definition
  • p. 20.
  • p. 270.
  • 6.3.4.2.
  • Relevant Criteria
  • p. 272.
  • 6.3.5.
  • Clarification by the EC Directive
  • p. 274.
  • 6.3.6.
  • Scope of Protection
  • p. 276.
  • 1.7.1.
  • 6.3.6.1.
  • Well-Balanced System
  • p. 277.
  • 6.3.6.2.
  • Weighting Pros and Cons
  • p. 278.
  • 6.4.
  • The
  • Concept of Animal Variety
  • p. 280.
  • Division
  • 6.4.1.
  • Legal Problems Specific to Animals
  • p. 283.
  • 6.4.1.1.
  • Unclear Concept
  • p. 284.
  • 6.4.2.
  • Proper Interpretation
  • p. 286.
  • 6.4.2.1.
  • p. 21.
  • Methods of Interpretation
  • p. 287.
  • 6.4.2.2.
  • Clarification
  • p. 288.
  • 6.4.3.
  • The
  • Purpose of Law
  • p. 290.
  • 6.4.3.1.
  • 1.7.2.
  • Analogous Application of the DUS Criteria
  • p. 291.
  • 6.5.
  • Other Ways to Protect Varieties (Excurs) US Law
  • p. 294.
  • 6.5.1.
  • U.S. Plant Protection
  • p. 294.
  • 6.5.2.
  • Patent Protection vs. Copyright Protection
  • Mode of Operation
  • p. 297.
  • 6.5.3.
  • A
  • Sui Generis System
  • p. 299.
  • 7.
  • Process Plants
  • p. 303.
  • 7.1.
  • Technical Character
  • International and Regional Legal Instruments
  • p. 22.
  • p. 304.
  • 7.1.1.
  • A
  • Higher Level of Technicality
  • p. 305.
  • 7.1.2.
  • Interpretation
  • p. 306.
  • 7.2.
  • Analysis
  • 2.
  • p. 308.
  • 7.2.1.
  • Technical Standard
  • p. 309.
  • 7.2.2.
  • Effect of End Product
  • p. 310.
  • 7.3.
  • Microbiological Processes and Their Products
  • p. 311.
  • Invention or Discovery
  • 7.3.1.
  • EPC Case Law
  • p. 311.
  • 7.3.2.
  • Method of Interpretation
  • p. 313.
  • 7.3.2.2.
  • Objective Technological Method
  • p. 316.
  • 7.4.
  • p. 23.
  • Analysing Remarks
  • p. 317.
  • 7.4.1.
  • Application
  • p. 318.
  • 8.
  • Overall Analysis
  • p. 321.
  • 8.1.
  • Analytical Framework
  • 2.1.
  • p. 322.
  • 8.1.1.
  • Defined Right
  • p. 322.
  • 8.2.
  • No Satisfactory Solution
  • p. 323.
  • 8.2.1.
  • Plant Variety
  • p. 324.
  • Invention
  • 8.2.1.1.
  • Standpoint of PBR Law
  • p. 325.
  • 8.2.1.2.
  • Alternative Legal Understanding
  • p. 326.
  • 8.2.2.
  • The
  • Animal Variety Concept
  • p. 328.
  • p. 24.
  • 8.2.2.1.
  • Shift in Perspective
  • p. 329.
  • 8.2.2.2.
  • Alternate Understanding
  • p. 329.
  • 8.2.3.
  • Essentially Biological Process
  • p. 331.
  • 8.2.3.1.
  • 2.1.1.
  • Comprehensive View
  • p. 332.
  • 8.2.4.
  • Microbiological Process
  • p. 332.
  • 8.3.
  • Intrinsic Incoherence
  • p. 333.
  • 8.3.1.
  • Historical Explanation
  • Legal Definition
  • p. 334.
  • 8.3.2.
  • Point of Departure
  • p. 336.
  • 8.3.2.1.
  • Available Protection
  • p. 337.
  • 8.3.2.2.
  • Double Protection
  • p. 338.
  • p. 25.
  • 8.3.2.3.
  • Cross- and Compulsory Licensing (Excurs)
  • p. 339.
  • 8.3.3.
  • Other Kinds of Protection (Excurs)
  • p. 341.
  • 8.4.
  • Predictable Basis
  • p. 343.
  • 8.4.1.
  • p. 4.
  • 2.1.2.
  • Rules of Interpretation
  • p. 344.
  • 8.4.2.
  • Different Solutions
  • p. 345
  • Invention as Opposed to Discovery
  • p. 25.
  • 2.2.1.
  • Typology
  • p. 26.
  • 2.2.2.
  • Natural-Technological Processes
  • p. 27.
  • 2.2.3.
  • 1.3.
  • Living Organisms- Products of Nature
  • p. 27.
  • 2.2.4.
  • No New Properties
  • p. 28.
  • 2.2.5.
  • Creation By Man
  • p. 28.
  • 2.2.6.
  • Technical Means- New Organisms
  • Eligibility
  • p. 29.
  • 2.2.7.
  • Living Organisms and Their Parts Patentable
  • p. 30.
  • 2.2.8.
  • Prepared in Non-Natural Forms
  • p. 32.
  • 2.2.9.
  • CDNA's are not 'Natural Products'
  • p. 33.
  • p. 349
  • 8.4.3.
  • Distinguishable Aspects
  • p. 346.
  • 8.4.4.
  • Range of Equivalents
  • p. 348.
  • 8.4.5.
  • Proper Basis
Control code
49225571
Dimensions
26 cm
Extent
x, 351 pages
Isbn
9789041188830
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2002020880
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n

Library Locations

    • Pardee Legal Research CenterBorrow it
      5998 Alcalá Park, San Diego, CA, 92110-2492, US
      32.771471 -117.187496
Processing Feedback ...