Coverart for item
The Resource Challenges and issues facing the education system in South Africa, edited by Marekwa Wilfred Legotlo

Challenges and issues facing the education system in South Africa, edited by Marekwa Wilfred Legotlo

Label
Challenges and issues facing the education system in South Africa
Title
Challenges and issues facing the education system in South Africa
Statement of responsibility
edited by Marekwa Wilfred Legotlo
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
The quality of education is pivotal for the production of human capital and this cannot be compromised by failing to refocus on the quality of education offered in schools. The inputs in the system such as trained and motivated teachers, buildings and classrooms including sanitation, clean water, instructional material such as textbooks, as well as strong leadership with vision to steer the winds of change are important in providing the desired outcomes
Cataloging source
CN8ML
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Legotlo, Marekwa Wilfred
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Education
  • Blacks
  • Educational change
  • EDUCATION
  • EDUCATION
  • EDUCATION
  • Blacks
  • Education
  • Educational change
  • South Africa
  • EDUCATION / Educational Policy & Reform / General
Label
Challenges and issues facing the education system in South Africa, edited by Marekwa Wilfred Legotlo
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Note
AC-SUB
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1.3.
  • Maxims on poverty's impact on the education of children of the poor
  • Notes
  • ch. 5
  • Learner rights and challenges in public schools
  • Almon Shumba
  • 5.1.
  • Background
  • 5.2.
  • Policies protecting learners from sexual harassment and sexual violence in schools
  • 5.3.
  • Challenges facing the school system in South Africa
  • African Charter on Human and People's Rights
  • 5.4.
  • right of learners to have rights in schools
  • 5.5.
  • South African documents dealing with learner rights
  • 5.6.
  • Types of learner rights in South African schools
  • 5.7.
  • Method
  • 5.8.
  • 1.3.1.
  • Discussion and implications of the findings
  • 5.9.
  • Conclusion
  • 5.10.
  • Recommendations
  • Notes
  • ch. 6
  • School violence in South Africa
  • Hlengiwe Sehlapelo
  • 6.1.
  • Resource issues
  • Introduction: General perspectives on school violence
  • 6.2.
  • Problem statement and conceptual issues
  • 6.2.1.
  • Problem statement
  • 6.2.2.
  • Conceptual issues
  • 6.3.
  • General aim and objectives
  • 6.4.
  • 1.3.2.
  • Key questions and methodological considerations
  • Key research questions
  • Methodological considerations
  • Conducting conceptual studies
  • Rationale for the study
  • 6.5.
  • Review of the UN children's rights context and school violence
  • 6.6.
  • Review of the African context of learners' rights and school violence
  • 6.7.
  • Staff related issues
  • Review of South African learners' rights context and school violence
  • constitutional protection of learners' rights in South Africa
  • new education policy context
  • legislative and regulatory framework
  • Construct definition from the African literature perspective
  • 6.8.
  • Conceptual analysis
  • 6.8.1.
  • Types of school violence
  • 6.8.2.
  • 1.3.3.
  • Causes and consequences of school violence
  • 6.9.
  • Global preventive strategies
  • 6.10.
  • Preventive strategies in South Africa
  • 6.11.
  • Concluding remarks
  • Notes
  • ch. 7
  • Educator motivation and morale in South Africa
  • Learner issues
  • Alfred Makura
  • 7.1.
  • Introduction
  • 7.2.
  • Issues, challenges and concerns
  • 7.3.
  • Rationale for the study
  • 7.4.
  • Preliminary literature study
  • 7.4.1.
  • 1.4.
  • Motivation theory
  • 7.4.2.
  • Instinct theory
  • 7.4.3.
  • Need theory
  • 7.4.4.
  • Drive theory
  • 7.4.5.
  • Cognitive theory of motivation
  • 7.5.
  • Overview of chapters
  • Level and determinants of educator motivation and morale
  • 7.6.
  • Impact of educator motivation and morale
  • 7.7.
  • Empirical study on educator motivation and morale in South Africa
  • Research design
  • Sample
  • Instrumentation
  • Data collection procedure
  • Data Analysis
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • 1.4.1.
  • Results
  • 7.8.
  • Discussion
  • 7.9.
  • Conclusion and recommendations
  • Notes
  • ch. 8
  • All educators for all schools: a case study of teaching practice by student-educators at Mafikeng Campus of North-West University
  • Monde Ndandani
  • 8.1.
  • Learner related issues, poverty and schooling
  • Introduction
  • 8.2.
  • Background to the study
  • 8.3.
  • Theoretical framework
  • 8.4.
  • Selection of participants
  • 8.5.
  • Research design and methodology
  • 8.6.
  • 1.4.2.
  • Data collection methods
  • 8.7.
  • Findings and discussion
  • Student-educators' questionnaire
  • Staff in the Faculty of Education
  • Analysis
  • 8.8.
  • Conclusion
  • Notes
  • ch. 9
  • Educator related issues
  • Challenges in the implementation of inclusive education
  • Ellen Kakhuta Materechera
  • 9.1.
  • Introduction
  • 9.2.
  • Background
  • 9.2.1.
  • Conceptions of disability (and barriers to learning)
  • medical model of disability
  • social model of disability
  • 1.4.3.
  • 9.3.
  • Global perspective
  • 9.3.1.
  • Inclusive education as perceived and practised in different countries: developed versus developing countries
  • comparison of inclusive education practices in two developed countries (US and UK) and two developing countries (India and Malawi)
  • Challenges of inclusive education in developing countries
  • Ghana
  • Zimbabwe
  • Lesotho
  • Namibia
  • Policy implementation
  • Botswana
  • 9.4.
  • South African context
  • 9.5.
  • Problem statement
  • 9.6.
  • study
  • Sub-questions
  • 9.6.1.
  • Context and participants
  • 1.4.4.
  • 9.6.2.
  • Data collection
  • 9.6.3.
  • Data analysis
  • 9.7.
  • Results and discussion
  • 9.7.1.
  • Lack of training
  • Assumptions about overall benefits of training
  • Effects a lack of training has on educators' attitudes, feelings and emotions
  • Principalship
  • 9.7.2.
  • Workload
  • 9.7.3.
  • Large classes and overcrowding
  • 9.7.4.
  • Lack of time
  • 9.7.5.
  • Lack of resources
  • 9.7.6.
  • Resistance to change and negative attitudes
  • 1.5.
  • 9.7.7.
  • Issues of poverty
  • 9.8.
  • Conclusions and recommendations
  • Conclusions
  • Recommendations
  • Recommendations confirming previous international and national studies
  • Recommendations relating to the more detailed findings
  • Notes
  • ch. 10
  • Summary
  • Communities' contribution to school success or failure
  • Nnior Machomi Morake
  • 10.1.
  • Introduction
  • 10.2.
  • What is a community?
  • 10.3.
  • Conceptualising community involvement and community engagement
  • 10.4.
  • Community partnership in school success
  • ch. 1
  • Notes
  • 10.5.
  • Concentrated versus diffused stakeholder involvement
  • What is concentrated stakeholder involvement?
  • What is diffused stakeholder involvement?
  • [" Relative advantage
  • [" Compatibility
  • [" Complexity
  • [" Observability
  • [" Trialability
  • [" Risk factor
  • ch. 2
  • 10.6.
  • Explaining implementation of success and failure
  • 10.7.
  • Challenges facing community involvement in school matters
  • 10.8.
  • Best practices regarding meaningful community involvement in school success
  • 10.9.
  • Lessons learned about community in school success or failure
  • 10.10.
  • Recommendations to policymakers and implementers
  • Rural Schools in South Africa: issues and challenges
  • 10.11.
  • Conclusion
  • Notes
  • ch
  • Monde Ndandani
  • 2.1.
  • Background
  • 2.2.
  • South African rural schools and their socio-economic environment
  • 2.3.
  • Geographical location of rural villages and their expectations on schools that serve them
  • Orientation
  • 2.4.
  • Environment and learning
  • 2.5.
  • Pre-schooling within the context and content of an early learning resource unit (elru)
  • 2.6.
  • immediate surroundings of rural schools: the other side of the school fence
  • 2.6.1.
  • Inside school premises
  • 2.7.
  • realities of rural schools in South Africa
  • Marekwa Wilfred Legotlo
  • National Nutrition Programme (NSNP) and 'quintile 1' schools
  • Resource targeting list
  • Visits to Mofofotso 1 and Khunwana village high schools in the North-West Province
  • Products of rural schools and their rural homes: engagements to retain pockets of rural population in their home communities
  • Sustenance matters in school education
  • 2.8.
  • Conclusion and recommendation
  • Collaborative mapping of the road to bringing South African rural schools to the centre of educational discourse and dialogue
  • Notes
  • ch. 3
  • 1.1.
  • Farm Schools in South Africa: issues and challenges
  • Monde Ndandani
  • 3.1.
  • Introduction
  • 3.2.
  • Background on farm schools
  • 3.3.
  • Typical farm schools
  • Kgotlelela and Reitshokile as typical farm schools
  • Visit to Reitshokile combined and Kgotlelela primary schools in Stella area, North-West Province
  • Introduction
  • 3.4.
  • Mega farm school
  • Historical background and further details on mega farm schools in South Africa: the case of North West Provincial Department of Education
  • 3.5.
  • Challenges facing mega farm schools
  • 3.6.
  • Conclusion and recommendations
  • Notes
  • ch. 4
  • Schooling and poverty in South Africa
  • 1.2.
  • Monde Ndandani
  • 4.1.
  • Conceptual framework
  • 4.2.
  • Some of it starts here
  • 4.3.
  • Poor communities and their 'no-fee' schools
  • 4.4.
  • Accepted practices regarding poverty and schooling in South Africa
  • 4.5.
  • Background to schooling problems in South Africa
  • Acceptance and adaptation to a life of poverty
  • 4.6.
  • Dyadic correlates: poverty and illiteracy
  • 4.7.
  • Children of the poor and their career aspirations
  • 4.8.
  • Incorporating skills acquisition/learning from the rural environment: curriculum considerations for rural schools
  • 4.9.
  • Concerns about the children of the poor and their schooling
  • 4.10.
  • Literature study
  • Issues and challenges facing school principals
  • Instructional leadership
  • 11.4.
  • Professional development of school principals
  • Forms of professional development
  • Training
  • On-site learning programmes
  • Networks
  • Professional development schools
  • 11
  • 11.5.
  • Programmes for the professional development of principals
  • Professional development of school principals in the United Kingdom
  • 11.6.
  • Professional development of school principals in South Africa
  • From elections to white paper 2
  • Report of the task team on education management development
  • Education white paper 3 of 1997
  • Education management and leadership development draft of 2004
  • South African national professional qualification for principalship, 2004
  • Management development needs for school principals
  • South African standard for principalship, 2005
  • 11.7.
  • Research methodology
  • 11.8.
  • Findings and discussion
  • Programmes for management development for school principals should be well-tested
  • Principals are catalysts in efficacy of instruction and management
  • Principals should have a qualification in management and leadership before they are appointed to their positions
  • Marekwa Wilfred Legotlo
  • 11.1.
  • Background
  • 11.2.
  • Introduction
  • 11.3.
  • 11.9.
  • Recommendations
  • Recruitment and retention of school principals
  • Prinicipal certification
  • Management development programmes for school principals should be customised to ensure responsiveness to particular needs
  • Principals should have an integrated understanding of productive organisational development
  • Profesionalisation should create confidence in the principal
  • 11.10.
  • Conclusion
  • Notes
  • Note continued:
  • ch. 12
  • Summary of recommendations
  • Marekwa Wilfred Legotlo
  • 12.1.
  • Introduction
  • 12.2.
  • Recommendations
  • 12.2.1.
  • Expand equitable access and fight poverty
  • [" Control and stop the mushrooming of informal settlements
  • Not everyone can be a principal and there should be special attributes for appointment to a principal position
  • [" Increase bright lights in rural areas
  • 12.2.2.
  • Ruralise the school curriculum
  • 12.2.3.
  • Improve the quality and delivery of learning materials and textbooks
  • 12.2.4.
  • Improve the commitment and morale of educators
  • 12.2.5.
  • Address farm school issues
  • 12.2.6.
  • Well-run and better managed schools produce better results and graduates of substance
  • Protect learners' rights
  • 12.2.7.
  • Strategise to address school violence
  • [" Develop and implement safe-school plans
  • [" Create curriculum and democratic values
  • 12.2.8.
  • Decide on inclusive education issues
  • [" Pre-service educator training programmes
  • [" In-service programmes
  • [" Intensify support for inclusive education
  • school principal should be trained in marketing so that he or she can attract funding for the school
  • [" Reduce heavy workloads
  • 12.2.9.
  • Improve school-community relations
  • 12.2.10.
  • Improve management development of school principals
  • [" Recruitment and selection of school principals
  • [" Induction and mentoring
  • [" Principals' certification patterns
  • [" Principal centres and networking
  • [" In-service programmes for school principals
  • well-trained and qualified principal forms successful relationships with staff, the community and other stakeholders
  • Principalship should not be a promotional position but a professional position
  • Principals who have management qualifications always manage changes better than principals who do not have a management qualification
  • principal who has undergone management development and training has the confidence to explain rules, procedures and regulations to stakeholders
Control code
ocn903596724
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (290 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780798304634
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctvh88036
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)903596724
Label
Challenges and issues facing the education system in South Africa, edited by Marekwa Wilfred Legotlo
Publication
Copyright
Note
AC-SUB
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1.3.
  • Maxims on poverty's impact on the education of children of the poor
  • Notes
  • ch. 5
  • Learner rights and challenges in public schools
  • Almon Shumba
  • 5.1.
  • Background
  • 5.2.
  • Policies protecting learners from sexual harassment and sexual violence in schools
  • 5.3.
  • Challenges facing the school system in South Africa
  • African Charter on Human and People's Rights
  • 5.4.
  • right of learners to have rights in schools
  • 5.5.
  • South African documents dealing with learner rights
  • 5.6.
  • Types of learner rights in South African schools
  • 5.7.
  • Method
  • 5.8.
  • 1.3.1.
  • Discussion and implications of the findings
  • 5.9.
  • Conclusion
  • 5.10.
  • Recommendations
  • Notes
  • ch. 6
  • School violence in South Africa
  • Hlengiwe Sehlapelo
  • 6.1.
  • Resource issues
  • Introduction: General perspectives on school violence
  • 6.2.
  • Problem statement and conceptual issues
  • 6.2.1.
  • Problem statement
  • 6.2.2.
  • Conceptual issues
  • 6.3.
  • General aim and objectives
  • 6.4.
  • 1.3.2.
  • Key questions and methodological considerations
  • Key research questions
  • Methodological considerations
  • Conducting conceptual studies
  • Rationale for the study
  • 6.5.
  • Review of the UN children's rights context and school violence
  • 6.6.
  • Review of the African context of learners' rights and school violence
  • 6.7.
  • Staff related issues
  • Review of South African learners' rights context and school violence
  • constitutional protection of learners' rights in South Africa
  • new education policy context
  • legislative and regulatory framework
  • Construct definition from the African literature perspective
  • 6.8.
  • Conceptual analysis
  • 6.8.1.
  • Types of school violence
  • 6.8.2.
  • 1.3.3.
  • Causes and consequences of school violence
  • 6.9.
  • Global preventive strategies
  • 6.10.
  • Preventive strategies in South Africa
  • 6.11.
  • Concluding remarks
  • Notes
  • ch. 7
  • Educator motivation and morale in South Africa
  • Learner issues
  • Alfred Makura
  • 7.1.
  • Introduction
  • 7.2.
  • Issues, challenges and concerns
  • 7.3.
  • Rationale for the study
  • 7.4.
  • Preliminary literature study
  • 7.4.1.
  • 1.4.
  • Motivation theory
  • 7.4.2.
  • Instinct theory
  • 7.4.3.
  • Need theory
  • 7.4.4.
  • Drive theory
  • 7.4.5.
  • Cognitive theory of motivation
  • 7.5.
  • Overview of chapters
  • Level and determinants of educator motivation and morale
  • 7.6.
  • Impact of educator motivation and morale
  • 7.7.
  • Empirical study on educator motivation and morale in South Africa
  • Research design
  • Sample
  • Instrumentation
  • Data collection procedure
  • Data Analysis
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • 1.4.1.
  • Results
  • 7.8.
  • Discussion
  • 7.9.
  • Conclusion and recommendations
  • Notes
  • ch. 8
  • All educators for all schools: a case study of teaching practice by student-educators at Mafikeng Campus of North-West University
  • Monde Ndandani
  • 8.1.
  • Learner related issues, poverty and schooling
  • Introduction
  • 8.2.
  • Background to the study
  • 8.3.
  • Theoretical framework
  • 8.4.
  • Selection of participants
  • 8.5.
  • Research design and methodology
  • 8.6.
  • 1.4.2.
  • Data collection methods
  • 8.7.
  • Findings and discussion
  • Student-educators' questionnaire
  • Staff in the Faculty of Education
  • Analysis
  • 8.8.
  • Conclusion
  • Notes
  • ch. 9
  • Educator related issues
  • Challenges in the implementation of inclusive education
  • Ellen Kakhuta Materechera
  • 9.1.
  • Introduction
  • 9.2.
  • Background
  • 9.2.1.
  • Conceptions of disability (and barriers to learning)
  • medical model of disability
  • social model of disability
  • 1.4.3.
  • 9.3.
  • Global perspective
  • 9.3.1.
  • Inclusive education as perceived and practised in different countries: developed versus developing countries
  • comparison of inclusive education practices in two developed countries (US and UK) and two developing countries (India and Malawi)
  • Challenges of inclusive education in developing countries
  • Ghana
  • Zimbabwe
  • Lesotho
  • Namibia
  • Policy implementation
  • Botswana
  • 9.4.
  • South African context
  • 9.5.
  • Problem statement
  • 9.6.
  • study
  • Sub-questions
  • 9.6.1.
  • Context and participants
  • 1.4.4.
  • 9.6.2.
  • Data collection
  • 9.6.3.
  • Data analysis
  • 9.7.
  • Results and discussion
  • 9.7.1.
  • Lack of training
  • Assumptions about overall benefits of training
  • Effects a lack of training has on educators' attitudes, feelings and emotions
  • Principalship
  • 9.7.2.
  • Workload
  • 9.7.3.
  • Large classes and overcrowding
  • 9.7.4.
  • Lack of time
  • 9.7.5.
  • Lack of resources
  • 9.7.6.
  • Resistance to change and negative attitudes
  • 1.5.
  • 9.7.7.
  • Issues of poverty
  • 9.8.
  • Conclusions and recommendations
  • Conclusions
  • Recommendations
  • Recommendations confirming previous international and national studies
  • Recommendations relating to the more detailed findings
  • Notes
  • ch. 10
  • Summary
  • Communities' contribution to school success or failure
  • Nnior Machomi Morake
  • 10.1.
  • Introduction
  • 10.2.
  • What is a community?
  • 10.3.
  • Conceptualising community involvement and community engagement
  • 10.4.
  • Community partnership in school success
  • ch. 1
  • Notes
  • 10.5.
  • Concentrated versus diffused stakeholder involvement
  • What is concentrated stakeholder involvement?
  • What is diffused stakeholder involvement?
  • [" Relative advantage
  • [" Compatibility
  • [" Complexity
  • [" Observability
  • [" Trialability
  • [" Risk factor
  • ch. 2
  • 10.6.
  • Explaining implementation of success and failure
  • 10.7.
  • Challenges facing community involvement in school matters
  • 10.8.
  • Best practices regarding meaningful community involvement in school success
  • 10.9.
  • Lessons learned about community in school success or failure
  • 10.10.
  • Recommendations to policymakers and implementers
  • Rural Schools in South Africa: issues and challenges
  • 10.11.
  • Conclusion
  • Notes
  • ch
  • Monde Ndandani
  • 2.1.
  • Background
  • 2.2.
  • South African rural schools and their socio-economic environment
  • 2.3.
  • Geographical location of rural villages and their expectations on schools that serve them
  • Orientation
  • 2.4.
  • Environment and learning
  • 2.5.
  • Pre-schooling within the context and content of an early learning resource unit (elru)
  • 2.6.
  • immediate surroundings of rural schools: the other side of the school fence
  • 2.6.1.
  • Inside school premises
  • 2.7.
  • realities of rural schools in South Africa
  • Marekwa Wilfred Legotlo
  • National Nutrition Programme (NSNP) and 'quintile 1' schools
  • Resource targeting list
  • Visits to Mofofotso 1 and Khunwana village high schools in the North-West Province
  • Products of rural schools and their rural homes: engagements to retain pockets of rural population in their home communities
  • Sustenance matters in school education
  • 2.8.
  • Conclusion and recommendation
  • Collaborative mapping of the road to bringing South African rural schools to the centre of educational discourse and dialogue
  • Notes
  • ch. 3
  • 1.1.
  • Farm Schools in South Africa: issues and challenges
  • Monde Ndandani
  • 3.1.
  • Introduction
  • 3.2.
  • Background on farm schools
  • 3.3.
  • Typical farm schools
  • Kgotlelela and Reitshokile as typical farm schools
  • Visit to Reitshokile combined and Kgotlelela primary schools in Stella area, North-West Province
  • Introduction
  • 3.4.
  • Mega farm school
  • Historical background and further details on mega farm schools in South Africa: the case of North West Provincial Department of Education
  • 3.5.
  • Challenges facing mega farm schools
  • 3.6.
  • Conclusion and recommendations
  • Notes
  • ch. 4
  • Schooling and poverty in South Africa
  • 1.2.
  • Monde Ndandani
  • 4.1.
  • Conceptual framework
  • 4.2.
  • Some of it starts here
  • 4.3.
  • Poor communities and their 'no-fee' schools
  • 4.4.
  • Accepted practices regarding poverty and schooling in South Africa
  • 4.5.
  • Background to schooling problems in South Africa
  • Acceptance and adaptation to a life of poverty
  • 4.6.
  • Dyadic correlates: poverty and illiteracy
  • 4.7.
  • Children of the poor and their career aspirations
  • 4.8.
  • Incorporating skills acquisition/learning from the rural environment: curriculum considerations for rural schools
  • 4.9.
  • Concerns about the children of the poor and their schooling
  • 4.10.
  • Literature study
  • Issues and challenges facing school principals
  • Instructional leadership
  • 11.4.
  • Professional development of school principals
  • Forms of professional development
  • Training
  • On-site learning programmes
  • Networks
  • Professional development schools
  • 11
  • 11.5.
  • Programmes for the professional development of principals
  • Professional development of school principals in the United Kingdom
  • 11.6.
  • Professional development of school principals in South Africa
  • From elections to white paper 2
  • Report of the task team on education management development
  • Education white paper 3 of 1997
  • Education management and leadership development draft of 2004
  • South African national professional qualification for principalship, 2004
  • Management development needs for school principals
  • South African standard for principalship, 2005
  • 11.7.
  • Research methodology
  • 11.8.
  • Findings and discussion
  • Programmes for management development for school principals should be well-tested
  • Principals are catalysts in efficacy of instruction and management
  • Principals should have a qualification in management and leadership before they are appointed to their positions
  • Marekwa Wilfred Legotlo
  • 11.1.
  • Background
  • 11.2.
  • Introduction
  • 11.3.
  • 11.9.
  • Recommendations
  • Recruitment and retention of school principals
  • Prinicipal certification
  • Management development programmes for school principals should be customised to ensure responsiveness to particular needs
  • Principals should have an integrated understanding of productive organisational development
  • Profesionalisation should create confidence in the principal
  • 11.10.
  • Conclusion
  • Notes
  • Note continued:
  • ch. 12
  • Summary of recommendations
  • Marekwa Wilfred Legotlo
  • 12.1.
  • Introduction
  • 12.2.
  • Recommendations
  • 12.2.1.
  • Expand equitable access and fight poverty
  • [" Control and stop the mushrooming of informal settlements
  • Not everyone can be a principal and there should be special attributes for appointment to a principal position
  • [" Increase bright lights in rural areas
  • 12.2.2.
  • Ruralise the school curriculum
  • 12.2.3.
  • Improve the quality and delivery of learning materials and textbooks
  • 12.2.4.
  • Improve the commitment and morale of educators
  • 12.2.5.
  • Address farm school issues
  • 12.2.6.
  • Well-run and better managed schools produce better results and graduates of substance
  • Protect learners' rights
  • 12.2.7.
  • Strategise to address school violence
  • [" Develop and implement safe-school plans
  • [" Create curriculum and democratic values
  • 12.2.8.
  • Decide on inclusive education issues
  • [" Pre-service educator training programmes
  • [" In-service programmes
  • [" Intensify support for inclusive education
  • school principal should be trained in marketing so that he or she can attract funding for the school
  • [" Reduce heavy workloads
  • 12.2.9.
  • Improve school-community relations
  • 12.2.10.
  • Improve management development of school principals
  • [" Recruitment and selection of school principals
  • [" Induction and mentoring
  • [" Principals' certification patterns
  • [" Principal centres and networking
  • [" In-service programmes for school principals
  • well-trained and qualified principal forms successful relationships with staff, the community and other stakeholders
  • Principalship should not be a promotional position but a professional position
  • Principals who have management qualifications always manage changes better than principals who do not have a management qualification
  • principal who has undergone management development and training has the confidence to explain rules, procedures and regulations to stakeholders
Control code
ocn903596724
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (290 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780798304634
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctvh88036
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)903596724

Library Locations

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      5998 Alcalá Park, San Diego, CA, 92110-2492, US
      32.771354 -117.193327
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