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The Resource Characteristically American : memorial architecture, national identity, and the Egyptian revival, Joy M. Giguere

Characteristically American : memorial architecture, national identity, and the Egyptian revival, Joy M. Giguere

Label
Characteristically American : memorial architecture, national identity, and the Egyptian revival
Title
Characteristically American
Title remainder
memorial architecture, national identity, and the Egyptian revival
Statement of responsibility
Joy M. Giguere
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Prior to the nineteenth century, few Americans knew anything more of Egyptian culture than what could be gained from studying the biblical Exodus. Napoleon's invasion of Egypt at the end of the eighteenth century, however, initiated a cultural breakthrough for Americans as representations of Egyptian culture flooded western museums and publications, sparking a growing interest in all things Egyptian that was coined Egyptomania. As Egyptomania swept over the West, a relatively young America began assimilating Egyptian culture into its own national identity, creating a hybrid national heritage that would vastly affect the memorial landscape of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Far more than a study of Egyptian revivalism, this book examines the Egyptian style of commemoration from the rural cemetery to national obelisks to the Sphinx at Mount Auburn Cemetery. Giguere argues that Americans adopted Egyptian forms of commemoration as readily as other neoclassical styles such as Greek revivalism, noting that the American landscape is littered with monuments that define the Egyptian style's importance to American national identity. Of particular interest is perhaps America's greatest commemorative obelisk: the Washington Monument. Standing at 555 feet high and constructed entirely of stone--making it the tallest obelisk in the world--the Washington Monument represents the pinnacle of Egyptian architecture's influence on America's desire to memorialize its national heroes by employing monumental forms associated with solidity and timelessness. Construction on the monument began in 1848, but controversy over its design, which at one point included a Greek colonnade surrounding the obelisk, and the American Civil War halted construction until 1877. Interestingly, Americans saw the completion of the Washington Monument after the Civil War as a mending of the nation itself, melding Egyptian commemoration with the reconstruction of America. As the twentieth century saw the rise of additional commemorative obelisks, the Egyptian Revival became ensconced in American national identity. Egyptian-style architecture has been used as a form of commemoration in memorials for World War I and II, the civil rights movement, and even as recently as the 9/11 remembrances. Giguere places the Egyptian style in a historical context that demonstrates how Americans actively sought to forge a national identity reminiscent of Egyptian culture that has endured to the present day
Action
Committed to retain
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1980-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Giguere, Joy M.
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
NA9347
LC item number
.G54 2014
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Roy and Marian Holleman Foundation
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Monuments
  • Egyptian revival (Architecture)
  • Nationalism and architecture
  • Architecture and society
  • Architecture and society
  • Egyptian revival (Architecture)
  • Monuments
  • Nationalism and architecture
  • United States
  • Baudenkmal
  • Denkmal
  • Grabmal
  • Ägyptophilie
  • USA
Label
Characteristically American : memorial architecture, national identity, and the Egyptian revival, Joy M. Giguere
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 249-263) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
The dream of Egypt -- "The dead shall be raised" : Egyptianizing in the rural cemetery movement -- Revolutionary monuments : the obelisks of Bunker Hill and Groton Heights -- America conservata, Africa liberata : the American sphinx at Mount Auburn Cemetery -- American obelisk : the Washington National Monument -- From Egyptian revival to American style -- Coda : the broken obelisk
Control code
866857467
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition
Extent
xvi, 274 pages
Isbn
9781621900399
Lccn
2013039690
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Note
Copley Library's copy funded by a grant from the Roy & Marian Holleman Foundation
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)866857467
Label
Characteristically American : memorial architecture, national identity, and the Egyptian revival, Joy M. Giguere
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 249-263) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
The dream of Egypt -- "The dead shall be raised" : Egyptianizing in the rural cemetery movement -- Revolutionary monuments : the obelisks of Bunker Hill and Groton Heights -- America conservata, Africa liberata : the American sphinx at Mount Auburn Cemetery -- American obelisk : the Washington National Monument -- From Egyptian revival to American style -- Coda : the broken obelisk
Control code
866857467
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition
Extent
xvi, 274 pages
Isbn
9781621900399
Lccn
2013039690
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Note
Copley Library's copy funded by a grant from the Roy & Marian Holleman Foundation
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)866857467

Library Locations

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      32.771354 -117.193327
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