Coverart for item
The Resource Cognitive self change : how offenders experience the world and what we can do about it, Jack Bush, Daryl M. Harris, and Richard J. Parker

Cognitive self change : how offenders experience the world and what we can do about it, Jack Bush, Daryl M. Harris, and Richard J. Parker

Label
Cognitive self change : how offenders experience the world and what we can do about it
Title
Cognitive self change
Title remainder
how offenders experience the world and what we can do about it
Statement of responsibility
Jack Bush, Daryl M. Harris, and Richard J. Parker
Creator
Contributor
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"This book draws on the latest literature to highlight a fundamental challenge in offender rehabilitation; it questions the ability of contemporary approaches to address this challenge, and proposes an alternative strategy of criminal justice that integrates control, opportunity, and autonomy"--
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1938-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Bush, Jack
Index
index present
LC call number
BF697
LC item number
.B8635 2016
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
  • 1968-
  • 1959-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Harris, Daryl
  • Parker, Richard
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Self psychology
  • Self-disclosure
  • Forensic psychology
  • Criminals
  • PSYCHOLOGY / Forensic Psychology
  • Criminals
  • Forensic psychology
  • Self-disclosure
  • Self psychology
Label
Cognitive self change : how offenders experience the world and what we can do about it, Jack Bush, Daryl M. Harris, and Richard J. Parker
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Introduction: Understanding Offending Behaviour Hard-Core Cognitive Self Change A human connection Phenomenology and self-reports: some preliminary comments about method Chapter Summary 1. The Idea of Criminal Thinking The Idea of Criminal Thinking Ellis, Beck, and Antisocial Schemas Psychopathology or irresponsibility An alternative point of view 2. Offenders Speak Their Minds Three young women Three Violent Mental Health Patients Two problematic groups Three British gang members Conclusions and Interpretations 3. Cognitive-Emotional-Motivational Structure Will and Volition, Self and Self-interest The Model Basic Outlaw Logic: learning the rewards of criminal thinking Variations of Criminal Thinking Conclusions and Implications 4. Supportive Authority and the Strategy of Choices The problem of engagement Conditions of communication and engagement Supportive Authority Re-thinking correctional treatment The strategy of choices Final comments 5. Cognitive Self Change Four Basic Steps Collaboration and the Strategy of Choices Brief Notes on Program Delivery: group size, duration and intensity, facilitator qualifications and training 6. Extended Applications of Supportive Authority Why offenders need help Not Either/Or: some promising examples The system as the intervention: some recent examples Supportive Authority, revisited An idealistic proposal (with modest expectations) 7. How we know: some observations about evidence 1) Introduction 2) Cognitive Self Change 3) The Significance of Subjectivity 4) Science and subjectivity References Index
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
768166563
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
x, 189 pages
Isbn
9780470974810
Lccn
2016014404
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)768166563
Label
Cognitive self change : how offenders experience the world and what we can do about it, Jack Bush, Daryl M. Harris, and Richard J. Parker
Publication
Note
Introduction: Understanding Offending Behaviour Hard-Core Cognitive Self Change A human connection Phenomenology and self-reports: some preliminary comments about method Chapter Summary 1. The Idea of Criminal Thinking The Idea of Criminal Thinking Ellis, Beck, and Antisocial Schemas Psychopathology or irresponsibility An alternative point of view 2. Offenders Speak Their Minds Three young women Three Violent Mental Health Patients Two problematic groups Three British gang members Conclusions and Interpretations 3. Cognitive-Emotional-Motivational Structure Will and Volition, Self and Self-interest The Model Basic Outlaw Logic: learning the rewards of criminal thinking Variations of Criminal Thinking Conclusions and Implications 4. Supportive Authority and the Strategy of Choices The problem of engagement Conditions of communication and engagement Supportive Authority Re-thinking correctional treatment The strategy of choices Final comments 5. Cognitive Self Change Four Basic Steps Collaboration and the Strategy of Choices Brief Notes on Program Delivery: group size, duration and intensity, facilitator qualifications and training 6. Extended Applications of Supportive Authority Why offenders need help Not Either/Or: some promising examples The system as the intervention: some recent examples Supportive Authority, revisited An idealistic proposal (with modest expectations) 7. How we know: some observations about evidence 1) Introduction 2) Cognitive Self Change 3) The Significance of Subjectivity 4) Science and subjectivity References Index
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
768166563
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
x, 189 pages
Isbn
9780470974810
Lccn
2016014404
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)768166563

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      32.771354 -117.193327
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