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The Resource Crime and criminality : causes and consequences, Ronald D. Hunter, Mark L. Dantzker

Crime and criminality : causes and consequences, Ronald D. Hunter, Mark L. Dantzker

Label
Crime and criminality : causes and consequences
Title
Crime and criminality
Title remainder
causes and consequences
Statement of responsibility
Ronald D. Hunter, Mark L. Dantzker
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • "Crime and Criminality" creates a bridge between "theoretical" and "applied" in this brief, yet thorough, text. It goes "back to basics, " eliminating excess rhetoric and concentrating on the core theories and issues
  • Written by law enforcement experts Ron Hunter and M.L. Dantzker, this text is highly suitable for any college setting. Readers will appreciate the simplicity of the explanations coupled with the broad applications they entail. This is definitely a criminology text for the real world!
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Hunter, Ronald D
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
HV6080
LC item number
.H85 2002
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1958-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Dantzker, Mark L.
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Criminal psychology
  • Criminal behavior
  • Criminology
Label
Crime and criminality : causes and consequences, Ronald D. Hunter, Mark L. Dantzker
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • p. 3.
  • Determinism
  • p. 34.
  • Darwin's theory of evolution
  • p. 34.
  • Lombroso's theory of atavism
  • p. 35.
  • Tenets of the positive school
  • p. 36.
  • Current status of the positive school
  • p. 37.
  • Defining crime
  • Criminology Today
  • p. 37.
  • Influences on crime
  • p. 38.
  • Chapter 3.
  • Biological and Biosocial Theories of Crime Causation
  • p. 44.
  • Biological Explanations
  • p. 45.
  • Early biological explanations
  • p. 4.
  • p. 46.
  • Transitional biological explanations
  • p. 49.
  • Contemporary biological explanations
  • p. 55.
  • Chapter 4.
  • Psychological and Psychosocial Theories of Crime Causation
  • p. 65.
  • Psychological Explanations
  • p. 66.
  • The
  • Psychology and determinism
  • p. 66.
  • Chapter 5.
  • Social Structure Theories of Crime Causation
  • p. 86.
  • Sociological Theories
  • p. 87.
  • Structural functionalism
  • p. 87.
  • Social structure theories
  • nature of criminal law
  • p. 88.
  • Chapter 6.
  • Social Interaction Theories of Crime Causation
  • p. 102.
  • Social Interactions Theories
  • p. 103.
  • Social process theories
  • p. 103.
  • Social reaction theories
  • p. 109.
  • p. 5.
  • Chapter 7.
  • Social Conflict Theories of Crime Causation
  • p. 117.
  • Social Conflict and Structural Functionalism
  • p. 118.
  • The
  • social conflict perspective
  • p. 119.
  • Chapter 8.
  • Integrated Theories of Crime Causation
  • Characteristics of criminal law
  • p. 133.
  • Criminology as an Interdisciplinary Science
  • p. 134.
  • Integrated Theories
  • p. 134.
  • Integrated classical theories
  • p. 135.
  • Integrated biological theories
  • p. 137.
  • Integrated psychological theories
  • p. 5.
  • p. 139.
  • Integrated sociological theories
  • p. 141.
  • Chapter 9.
  • Holistic Theories of Crime Causation
  • p. 149.
  • The
  • Holistic Approach to Crime
  • p. 150.
  • Jeffrey's bioenvironmental theory
  • Sources of crime statistics
  • p. 151.
  • Akers's conceptual absorption theory
  • p. 151.
  • Pearson and Weiner's conceptual integration
  • p. 151.
  • Vila's general paradigm
  • p. 152.
  • The
  • Need for General Theories
  • p. 153.
  • p. 6.
  • General Theories of Crime and Criminality
  • p. 153.
  • Self-control theory
  • p. 153.
  • Integrative delinquency theory
  • p. 154.
  • A
  • Synopsis of Integrated and Holistic Theories
  • p. 154.
  • Identity Theory
  • Chapter 1.
  • The
  • p. 155.
  • Assessment of Holistic Theories
  • p. 157.
  • Chapter 10.
  • Victimization Theories
  • p. 161.
  • Victimology
  • p. 162.
  • Early victimization theories
  • p. 163.
  • extent of crime
  • Contemporary victimization theories
  • p. 168.
  • Chapter 11.
  • Dealing with Lawbreakers
  • p. 173.
  • Dealing with Lawbreakers
  • p. 174.
  • The
  • rationales for imposing sanctions
  • p. 175.
  • p. 9.
  • The
  • classical response to crime
  • p. 176.
  • The
  • positive response to crime
  • p. 178.
  • Applying criminal sanctions
  • p. 180.
  • Alternative sanctions
  • p. 186.
  • The
  • Chapter 12.
  • Dealing with Victims
  • p. 190.
  • The
  • Extent of Crime Victimization
  • p. 191.
  • The
  • Consequences of Victimization
  • p. 192.
  • Individual costs of victimization
  • cost of crime
  • p. 192.
  • Societal costs of victimization
  • p. 193.
  • Types of Victimization
  • p. 193.
  • Victimization by strangers
  • p. 194.
  • Victimization in the workplace
  • p. 194.
  • Victimization by family
  • p. 10.
  • p. 195.
  • Victimization of special populations
  • p. 197.
  • Hate crimes
  • p. 199.
  • Responding to Victimization
  • p. 200.
  • Crime prevention
  • p. 200.
  • Victim assistance programs
  • Crime Typologies
  • p. 200.
  • Victim compensation
  • p. 200.
  • Offender restitution
  • p. 201.
  • Victim's rights
  • p. 201.
  • Chapter 13.
  • Dealing with the Law-abiding
  • p. 204.
  • p. 11.
  • Justice in the Eyes of the Law-abiding
  • p. 205.
  • The
  • Politics of Justice
  • p. 205.
  • The
  • social responsibility perspective
  • p. 206.
  • The
  • social problems perspective
  • Violent crimes
  • p. 208.
  • The
  • social engineering perspective
  • p. 209.
  • Administering Justice on Behalf of the Law-abiding
  • p. 211.
  • Condemning and punishing crime
  • p. 211.
  • Wooing constituents
  • p. 211.
  • p. 11.
  • Promoting social change
  • p. 212.
  • Rewarding compliance
  • p. 213.
  • Symbolic Reassurance
  • p. 213
  • The
  • Property crimes
  • p. 12.
  • Public order crimes
  • p. 13.
  • Political crimes
  • p. 13.
  • Occupational crimes
  • p. 13.
  • Corporate crime
  • p. 14.
  • Problem of Crime
  • Organized crime
  • p. 14.
  • Professional crimes
  • p. 15.
  • Criminal Typologies
  • p. 15.
  • Violent personal criminals
  • p. 15.
  • Occasional property criminals
  • p. 16.
  • p. 1.
  • Public order criminals
  • p. 16.
  • Political criminals
  • p. 16.
  • Occupational criminals
  • p. 17.
  • Corporate criminals
  • p. 17.
  • Organized criminals
  • p. 17.
  • Crime as Phenomenon
  • Professional criminals
  • p. 18.
  • Chapter 2.
  • The
  • Study of Crime
  • p. 22.
  • Introduction to Criminology
  • p. 23.
  • Defining criminology
  • p. 23.
  • p. 2.
  • The
  • study of criminology
  • p. 24.
  • The
  • five models of criminology
  • p. 25.
  • The
  • Classical School of Criminology
  • p. 26.
  • The
  • The
  • contributions of Cesare Beccaria
  • p. 28.
  • The
  • contributions of Jeremy Bentham
  • p. 28.
  • Tenets of the classical school
  • p. 29.
  • The
  • Neoclassical School of Criminology
  • p. 31.
  • nature of crime
  • Rationales for leniency
  • p. 31.
  • Just deserts
  • p. 33.
  • The
  • current status of the classical school
  • p. 33.
  • The
  • Positive School of Criminology
  • p. 34.
Control code
45841611
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xii, 225 pages
Isbn
9780133248722
Lccn
2001021915
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
Label
Crime and criminality : causes and consequences, Ronald D. Hunter, Mark L. Dantzker
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • p. 3.
  • Determinism
  • p. 34.
  • Darwin's theory of evolution
  • p. 34.
  • Lombroso's theory of atavism
  • p. 35.
  • Tenets of the positive school
  • p. 36.
  • Current status of the positive school
  • p. 37.
  • Defining crime
  • Criminology Today
  • p. 37.
  • Influences on crime
  • p. 38.
  • Chapter 3.
  • Biological and Biosocial Theories of Crime Causation
  • p. 44.
  • Biological Explanations
  • p. 45.
  • Early biological explanations
  • p. 4.
  • p. 46.
  • Transitional biological explanations
  • p. 49.
  • Contemporary biological explanations
  • p. 55.
  • Chapter 4.
  • Psychological and Psychosocial Theories of Crime Causation
  • p. 65.
  • Psychological Explanations
  • p. 66.
  • The
  • Psychology and determinism
  • p. 66.
  • Chapter 5.
  • Social Structure Theories of Crime Causation
  • p. 86.
  • Sociological Theories
  • p. 87.
  • Structural functionalism
  • p. 87.
  • Social structure theories
  • nature of criminal law
  • p. 88.
  • Chapter 6.
  • Social Interaction Theories of Crime Causation
  • p. 102.
  • Social Interactions Theories
  • p. 103.
  • Social process theories
  • p. 103.
  • Social reaction theories
  • p. 109.
  • p. 5.
  • Chapter 7.
  • Social Conflict Theories of Crime Causation
  • p. 117.
  • Social Conflict and Structural Functionalism
  • p. 118.
  • The
  • social conflict perspective
  • p. 119.
  • Chapter 8.
  • Integrated Theories of Crime Causation
  • Characteristics of criminal law
  • p. 133.
  • Criminology as an Interdisciplinary Science
  • p. 134.
  • Integrated Theories
  • p. 134.
  • Integrated classical theories
  • p. 135.
  • Integrated biological theories
  • p. 137.
  • Integrated psychological theories
  • p. 5.
  • p. 139.
  • Integrated sociological theories
  • p. 141.
  • Chapter 9.
  • Holistic Theories of Crime Causation
  • p. 149.
  • The
  • Holistic Approach to Crime
  • p. 150.
  • Jeffrey's bioenvironmental theory
  • Sources of crime statistics
  • p. 151.
  • Akers's conceptual absorption theory
  • p. 151.
  • Pearson and Weiner's conceptual integration
  • p. 151.
  • Vila's general paradigm
  • p. 152.
  • The
  • Need for General Theories
  • p. 153.
  • p. 6.
  • General Theories of Crime and Criminality
  • p. 153.
  • Self-control theory
  • p. 153.
  • Integrative delinquency theory
  • p. 154.
  • A
  • Synopsis of Integrated and Holistic Theories
  • p. 154.
  • Identity Theory
  • Chapter 1.
  • The
  • p. 155.
  • Assessment of Holistic Theories
  • p. 157.
  • Chapter 10.
  • Victimization Theories
  • p. 161.
  • Victimology
  • p. 162.
  • Early victimization theories
  • p. 163.
  • extent of crime
  • Contemporary victimization theories
  • p. 168.
  • Chapter 11.
  • Dealing with Lawbreakers
  • p. 173.
  • Dealing with Lawbreakers
  • p. 174.
  • The
  • rationales for imposing sanctions
  • p. 175.
  • p. 9.
  • The
  • classical response to crime
  • p. 176.
  • The
  • positive response to crime
  • p. 178.
  • Applying criminal sanctions
  • p. 180.
  • Alternative sanctions
  • p. 186.
  • The
  • Chapter 12.
  • Dealing with Victims
  • p. 190.
  • The
  • Extent of Crime Victimization
  • p. 191.
  • The
  • Consequences of Victimization
  • p. 192.
  • Individual costs of victimization
  • cost of crime
  • p. 192.
  • Societal costs of victimization
  • p. 193.
  • Types of Victimization
  • p. 193.
  • Victimization by strangers
  • p. 194.
  • Victimization in the workplace
  • p. 194.
  • Victimization by family
  • p. 10.
  • p. 195.
  • Victimization of special populations
  • p. 197.
  • Hate crimes
  • p. 199.
  • Responding to Victimization
  • p. 200.
  • Crime prevention
  • p. 200.
  • Victim assistance programs
  • Crime Typologies
  • p. 200.
  • Victim compensation
  • p. 200.
  • Offender restitution
  • p. 201.
  • Victim's rights
  • p. 201.
  • Chapter 13.
  • Dealing with the Law-abiding
  • p. 204.
  • p. 11.
  • Justice in the Eyes of the Law-abiding
  • p. 205.
  • The
  • Politics of Justice
  • p. 205.
  • The
  • social responsibility perspective
  • p. 206.
  • The
  • social problems perspective
  • Violent crimes
  • p. 208.
  • The
  • social engineering perspective
  • p. 209.
  • Administering Justice on Behalf of the Law-abiding
  • p. 211.
  • Condemning and punishing crime
  • p. 211.
  • Wooing constituents
  • p. 211.
  • p. 11.
  • Promoting social change
  • p. 212.
  • Rewarding compliance
  • p. 213.
  • Symbolic Reassurance
  • p. 213
  • The
  • Property crimes
  • p. 12.
  • Public order crimes
  • p. 13.
  • Political crimes
  • p. 13.
  • Occupational crimes
  • p. 13.
  • Corporate crime
  • p. 14.
  • Problem of Crime
  • Organized crime
  • p. 14.
  • Professional crimes
  • p. 15.
  • Criminal Typologies
  • p. 15.
  • Violent personal criminals
  • p. 15.
  • Occasional property criminals
  • p. 16.
  • p. 1.
  • Public order criminals
  • p. 16.
  • Political criminals
  • p. 16.
  • Occupational criminals
  • p. 17.
  • Corporate criminals
  • p. 17.
  • Organized criminals
  • p. 17.
  • Crime as Phenomenon
  • Professional criminals
  • p. 18.
  • Chapter 2.
  • The
  • Study of Crime
  • p. 22.
  • Introduction to Criminology
  • p. 23.
  • Defining criminology
  • p. 23.
  • p. 2.
  • The
  • study of criminology
  • p. 24.
  • The
  • five models of criminology
  • p. 25.
  • The
  • Classical School of Criminology
  • p. 26.
  • The
  • The
  • contributions of Cesare Beccaria
  • p. 28.
  • The
  • contributions of Jeremy Bentham
  • p. 28.
  • Tenets of the classical school
  • p. 29.
  • The
  • Neoclassical School of Criminology
  • p. 31.
  • nature of crime
  • Rationales for leniency
  • p. 31.
  • Just deserts
  • p. 33.
  • The
  • current status of the classical school
  • p. 33.
  • The
  • Positive School of Criminology
  • p. 34.
Control code
45841611
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xii, 225 pages
Isbn
9780133248722
Lccn
2001021915
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations

Library Locations

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      32.771471 -117.187496
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