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The Resource Economic conditions and welfare reform, Sheldon H. Danziger, editor

Economic conditions and welfare reform, Sheldon H. Danziger, editor

Label
Economic conditions and welfare reform
Title
Economic conditions and welfare reform
Statement of responsibility
Sheldon H. Danziger, editor
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
HV91
LC item number
.E26 1999
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Danziger, Sheldon
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Public welfare
  • Welfare recipients
  • United States
Label
Economic conditions and welfare reform, Sheldon H. Danziger, editor
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Part I.
  • States, Welfare Reform, and the Business Cycle
  • Howard Chernick, Therese J. McGuire
  • p. 275.
  • Lessons from the Literature on Grants-in-Aid and Competition among Neighboring States
  • p. 278.
  • The
  • Volatility of State Revenues and Expenditures over the Business Cycle
  • p. 292
  • Why Are Caseloads Falling?
  • p. 15.
  • Welfare Reform, the Business Cycle, and the Decline in AFDC Caseloads
  • David N. Figlio, James P. Ziliak
  • p. 17.
  • Review of Caseload Literature
  • p. 19.
  • Reconciling the CEA and Ziliak et al.
  • p. 24.
  • Reforming Welfare
  • What Will Happen to Recipiency Rates in the Next Recession?
  • p. 37.
  • What Goes Up Must Come Down?
  • Geoffrey Wallace, Rebecca M. Blank
  • p. 49.
  • Existing Research on Caseload Change
  • p. 52.
  • Why Food Stamp Caseloads Are Also Interesting
  • p. 56.
  • Estimates of the Determinants of Both AFDC/TANF and Food Stamp Caseloads
  • p. 1.
  • p. 57.
  • How Well Do These Estimates Explain Both the Rise and Fall of Caseloads?
  • p. 66.
  • Cross-Checking These Estimates with Monthly Data
  • p. 72.
  • The
  • Effect of Pre-PRWORA Waivers on AFDC Caseloads and Female Earnings, Income, and Labor Force Behavior
  • Robert A. Moffitt
  • p. 91.
  • Replicating the CEA Report Findings
  • Why Are Caseloads Falling?
  • p. 94.
  • Extending the Model to the CPS
  • p. 100.
  • Business Cycle Sensitivity
  • p. 107.
  • Examining the Effect of Industry Trends and Structure on Welfare Caseloads
  • Timothy J. Bartik, Randall W. Eberts
  • p. 119.
  • Extension of State-Level Estimates
  • p. 122.
  • p. 7.
  • Part II.
  • How Are Recipients Faring?
  • p. 159.
  • Work, Earnings, and Well-Being after Welfare
  • Maria Cancian, Robert Haveman, Thomas Kaplan, Daniel Meyer, Barbara Wolfe
  • p. 161.
  • Previous Studies of Postwelfare Economic Prospects
  • p. 163.
  • The
  • Postwelfare Experience of AFDC Recipients--National Survey Data
  • How Are Recipients Faring?
  • p. 164.
  • The
  • Postwelfare Experience in Wisconsin--Administrative Data
  • p. 169.
  • Studies of the Postwelfare Experience in Other States
  • p. 176.
  • Employer Demand for Welfare Recipients and the Business Cycle
  • Harry J. Holzer
  • p. 187.
  • The
  • p. 9.
  • New Employer Data
  • p. 189.
  • Empirical Results
  • p. 190.
  • Part III.
  • How Are the States Responding?
  • p. 219.
  • What Will the States Do When Jobs Are Not Plentiful?
  • LaDonna A. Pavetti
  • p. 221.
  • How Are the States Responding?
  • Welfare Reform in a Robust Economy
  • p. 221.
  • Implementing Work-Based Reforms When Jobs Are More Scarce
  • p. 224.
  • Factors Affecting the Magnitude of the Policy and Implementation Challenges
  • p. 243.
  • Cyclical Welfare Costs in the Post-Reform Era
  • Phillip B. Levine
  • p. 249.
  • How Much Does a Recession Cost?
  • p. 11.
  • p. 251.
  • Who Will Pay These Costs?
  • p. 254.
  • Financing Cyclical Costs in the Unemployment Insurance System
  • p. 258.
  • Historical Patterns of UI Trust Fund Adequacy
  • p. 259.
  • Are State UI Trust Funds Big Enough?
  • p. 263.
  • The
Control code
42476700
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
vii, 321 pages
Isbn
9780880991995
Isbn Type
(paper : alk. paper)
Lccn
99049277
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
Label
Economic conditions and welfare reform, Sheldon H. Danziger, editor
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Part I.
  • States, Welfare Reform, and the Business Cycle
  • Howard Chernick, Therese J. McGuire
  • p. 275.
  • Lessons from the Literature on Grants-in-Aid and Competition among Neighboring States
  • p. 278.
  • The
  • Volatility of State Revenues and Expenditures over the Business Cycle
  • p. 292
  • Why Are Caseloads Falling?
  • p. 15.
  • Welfare Reform, the Business Cycle, and the Decline in AFDC Caseloads
  • David N. Figlio, James P. Ziliak
  • p. 17.
  • Review of Caseload Literature
  • p. 19.
  • Reconciling the CEA and Ziliak et al.
  • p. 24.
  • Reforming Welfare
  • What Will Happen to Recipiency Rates in the Next Recession?
  • p. 37.
  • What Goes Up Must Come Down?
  • Geoffrey Wallace, Rebecca M. Blank
  • p. 49.
  • Existing Research on Caseload Change
  • p. 52.
  • Why Food Stamp Caseloads Are Also Interesting
  • p. 56.
  • Estimates of the Determinants of Both AFDC/TANF and Food Stamp Caseloads
  • p. 1.
  • p. 57.
  • How Well Do These Estimates Explain Both the Rise and Fall of Caseloads?
  • p. 66.
  • Cross-Checking These Estimates with Monthly Data
  • p. 72.
  • The
  • Effect of Pre-PRWORA Waivers on AFDC Caseloads and Female Earnings, Income, and Labor Force Behavior
  • Robert A. Moffitt
  • p. 91.
  • Replicating the CEA Report Findings
  • Why Are Caseloads Falling?
  • p. 94.
  • Extending the Model to the CPS
  • p. 100.
  • Business Cycle Sensitivity
  • p. 107.
  • Examining the Effect of Industry Trends and Structure on Welfare Caseloads
  • Timothy J. Bartik, Randall W. Eberts
  • p. 119.
  • Extension of State-Level Estimates
  • p. 122.
  • p. 7.
  • Part II.
  • How Are Recipients Faring?
  • p. 159.
  • Work, Earnings, and Well-Being after Welfare
  • Maria Cancian, Robert Haveman, Thomas Kaplan, Daniel Meyer, Barbara Wolfe
  • p. 161.
  • Previous Studies of Postwelfare Economic Prospects
  • p. 163.
  • The
  • Postwelfare Experience of AFDC Recipients--National Survey Data
  • How Are Recipients Faring?
  • p. 164.
  • The
  • Postwelfare Experience in Wisconsin--Administrative Data
  • p. 169.
  • Studies of the Postwelfare Experience in Other States
  • p. 176.
  • Employer Demand for Welfare Recipients and the Business Cycle
  • Harry J. Holzer
  • p. 187.
  • The
  • p. 9.
  • New Employer Data
  • p. 189.
  • Empirical Results
  • p. 190.
  • Part III.
  • How Are the States Responding?
  • p. 219.
  • What Will the States Do When Jobs Are Not Plentiful?
  • LaDonna A. Pavetti
  • p. 221.
  • How Are the States Responding?
  • Welfare Reform in a Robust Economy
  • p. 221.
  • Implementing Work-Based Reforms When Jobs Are More Scarce
  • p. 224.
  • Factors Affecting the Magnitude of the Policy and Implementation Challenges
  • p. 243.
  • Cyclical Welfare Costs in the Post-Reform Era
  • Phillip B. Levine
  • p. 249.
  • How Much Does a Recession Cost?
  • p. 11.
  • p. 251.
  • Who Will Pay These Costs?
  • p. 254.
  • Financing Cyclical Costs in the Unemployment Insurance System
  • p. 258.
  • Historical Patterns of UI Trust Fund Adequacy
  • p. 259.
  • Are State UI Trust Funds Big Enough?
  • p. 263.
  • The
Control code
42476700
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
vii, 321 pages
Isbn
9780880991995
Isbn Type
(paper : alk. paper)
Lccn
99049277
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations

Library Locations

    • Pardee Legal Research CenterBorrow it
      5998 Alcalá Park, San Diego, CA, 92110-2492, US
      32.771471 -117.187496
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