Coverart for item
The Resource Electoral systems and political context : how the effects of rules vary across new and established democracies, Robert G. Moser, Ethan Scheiner, (electronic resource)

Electoral systems and political context : how the effects of rules vary across new and established democracies, Robert G. Moser, Ethan Scheiner, (electronic resource)

Label
Electoral systems and political context : how the effects of rules vary across new and established democracies
Title
Electoral systems and political context
Title remainder
how the effects of rules vary across new and established democracies
Statement of responsibility
Robert G. Moser, Ethan Scheiner
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"Why Don't Electoral Rules Have the Same Effects in ALL Countries? In the early 1990s, Japan and Russia each adopted a very similar version of a "mixed-member" electoral system. In the form used in Japan and Russia, in elections to a single house of the legislature each voter cast two ballots: one for a candidate in a single-member district (SMD) and one for a party under proportional representation (PR). In the SMD races, both countries used first-past-the-post (FPTP) rules, meaning that the candidate winning the largest number of votes in the district wins the race, even if tallying under a majority of all the SMD ballots cast. In PR, parties win shares of seats roughly in proportion to their share of the party vote. In both Japan and Russia, the PR systems used closed-list rules, meaning that prior to each election central party leaders put together a rank-ordered list of candidates to determine which individuals would win seats if the party won representation in PR. In PR in both countries, voters were only given the chance to choose a single pre-set party list. Both countries used mixed-member-majoritarian (MMM) electoral systems, meaning that the SMD and PR components of the system were "unlinked" - seats won by parties in one tier (e.g., SMDs) did not affect the number of seats allocated to the party in the other tier (e.g., PR). In short, both Russia and Japan adopted very similar forms of mixed-member electoral systems. In both countries, it was widely expected that the different rules would promote particular outcomes:"--
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1966-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Moser, Robert G.
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1968-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Scheiner, Ethan
  • ProQuest (Firm)
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Proportional representation
  • Comparative government
Label
Electoral systems and political context : how the effects of rules vary across new and established democracies, Robert G. Moser, Ethan Scheiner, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction: why don't electoral rules have the same effects in all countries?; 2. When do the effects of electoral systems diverge from our expectations?; 3. Mixed-member electoral systems: how they work and how they work for scholars; 4. How democratic experience and party system development condition the effects of electoral rules on disproportionality and the number of parties: theory, measurement, and expectations; 5. How democratic experience and party system development condition the effects of electoral rules on disproportionality and the number of parties: what we actually see; 6. Political context, electoral rules, and their effects on strategic and personal voting; 7. How democratic experience and party system development condition the effect of electoral rules on strategic defection; 8. Social diversity, electoral rules, and the number of parties; 9. How political context shapes the effect of electoral rules on women's representation; 10. Conclusion: why and how political context matters for electoral system effects
Control code
EBC1025058
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
xxiv, 284 p.
Form of item
  • online
  • electronic
Other physical details
ill
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, MI : ProQuest, 2015. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest affiliated libraries
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC1025058
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL1025058
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10614473
  • (CaONFJC)MIL402806
  • (OCoLC)815287701
Label
Electoral systems and political context : how the effects of rules vary across new and established democracies, Robert G. Moser, Ethan Scheiner, (electronic resource)
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction: why don't electoral rules have the same effects in all countries?; 2. When do the effects of electoral systems diverge from our expectations?; 3. Mixed-member electoral systems: how they work and how they work for scholars; 4. How democratic experience and party system development condition the effects of electoral rules on disproportionality and the number of parties: theory, measurement, and expectations; 5. How democratic experience and party system development condition the effects of electoral rules on disproportionality and the number of parties: what we actually see; 6. Political context, electoral rules, and their effects on strategic and personal voting; 7. How democratic experience and party system development condition the effect of electoral rules on strategic defection; 8. Social diversity, electoral rules, and the number of parties; 9. How political context shapes the effect of electoral rules on women's representation; 10. Conclusion: why and how political context matters for electoral system effects
Control code
EBC1025058
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
xxiv, 284 p.
Form of item
  • online
  • electronic
Other physical details
ill
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, MI : ProQuest, 2015. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest affiliated libraries
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC1025058
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL1025058
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10614473
  • (CaONFJC)MIL402806
  • (OCoLC)815287701

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