Coverart for item
The Resource European and international media law : liberal democracy, trade, and the new media, Perry Keller

European and international media law : liberal democracy, trade, and the new media, Perry Keller

Label
European and international media law : liberal democracy, trade, and the new media
Title
European and international media law
Title remainder
liberal democracy, trade, and the new media
Statement of responsibility
Perry Keller
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
'Liberal Democracy and the New Media' considers the rapidly changing relationship between the media and the liberal democratic state. It explores key contemporary media issues and captures the extraordinary impact of the liberal media model on European and international law as well as exploring its profound weaknesses
Member of
Cataloging source
DKU
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/collectionName
Oxford Scholarship Online
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Keller, Perry
Index
index present
Language note
English
LC call number
K4240
LC item number
.K448 2011 ONLINE
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Mass media
  • Mass media policy
  • Mass media
  • Mass media policy
Label
European and international media law : liberal democracy, trade, and the new media, Perry Keller
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Technologies of harm and inequality
  • Intervention in media markets and restrictions on the liberty to publish
  • p. 144.
  • Exporting European media law
  • p. 147.
  • 5.
  • International Trade in Media Goods and Services
  • p. 149.
  • Trade in goods and the liberty to publish
  • p. 155.
  • Trade in services and the liberty to publish
  • p. 21.
  • p. 158.
  • The
  • media in the Doha Round
  • p. 164.
  • The
  • media and general exceptions
  • p. 176.
  • 6.
  • The
  • Media in European and International Human Rights Law
  • Technologies of surveillance and control
  • p. 185.
  • Part I.
  • The
  • media in European human rights law
  • p. 185.
  • ECHR Article 10 and the media state relationship
  • p. 191.
  • The
  • margin of appreciation
  • p. 201.
  • p. 27.
  • Balancing rights and interests
  • p. 203.
  • Part II.
  • International human rights law and the media
  • p. 205.
  • Resisting liberal democracy
  • p. 212.
  • The
  • liberal democratic project-purposes and achievements
  • p. 218.
  • 2.
  • 7.
  • Jurisdiction and the Media
  • p. 224.
  • Territory, sovereignty, and jurisdiction
  • p. 225.
  • Radio broadcasting and the territorial state
  • p. 228.
  • Liberal democracy perspectives on broadcasting jurisdiction
  • p. 231.
  • Broadcasting jurisdiction and the Audiovisual Media Services Directive
  • The
  • p. 235.
  • International jurisdiction in the internet era
  • p. 238.
  • Jurisdiction and transatlantic differences
  • p. 240.
  • The
  • Hague judgments project
  • p. 248.
  • Territory, jurisdiction, and the internet
  • p. 251.
  • Media and the Liberal Democratic State
  • Part III.
  • Restricting the Liberty to Publish
  • 8.
  • Criticism of the State and Incitement to Violence
  • p. 261.
  • Criticism and incitement in the European Union
  • p. 265.
  • Criticism and incitement in the Council of Europe
  • p. 271.
  • Criticism and incitement in international trade law
  • p. 37.
  • p. 279.
  • Criticism and incitement in international human rights law
  • p. 282.
  • 9.
  • Access to State Information
  • p. 286.
  • Access to state information in the European Union
  • p. 289.
  • Access to state information in the Council of Europe
  • p. 295.
  • Liberalism and expression
  • Access to state information in international law
  • p. 302.
  • 10.
  • Information Privacy and Reputation
  • p. 307.
  • Information privacy and reputation in the European Union
  • p. 313.
  • Information privacy and reputation in the Council of Europe
  • p. 317.
  • Information privacy and reputation in international law
  • p. 38.
  • p. 327.
  • 11.
  • Protection of Personal Data
  • p. 331.
  • Data protection in the European Union
  • p. 334.
  • Data protection in the Council of Europe
  • p. 345.
  • Data protection in international law
  • p. 348.
  • Part I.
  • Harm and robust tolerance
  • 12.
  • Pornography and Violence
  • p. 356.
  • Pornographic, violent, and offensive content in the European Union
  • p. 361.
  • Council of Europe: offence, harm, and human rights
  • p. 368.
  • Pornography and violence in international law
  • p. 376.
  • 13.
  • p. 40.
  • Incitement to Hatred
  • p. 383.
  • Incitement to hatred in the European Union
  • p. 386.
  • Council of Europe, human rights, and incitement to hatred
  • p. 390.
  • Hate speech in international law
  • p. 395.
  • Part IV.
  • Intervention in Media Markets
  • Universality and value pluralism
  • 14.
  • Democracy, Pluralism, and the Media
  • p. 405.
  • Media pluralism in European public order
  • p. 412.
  • Sttuctural solutions for the protection of media pluralism
  • p. 416.
  • Structural pluralism beyond competition law
  • p. 419.
  • State monopolies and broadcast licensing
  • p. 41.
  • p. 423.
  • Impartiality and elections
  • p. 428.
  • Public service media
  • p. 431.
  • Media pluralism and intellectual property rights
  • p. 434.
  • Must carry, universal service, and network neutrality
  • p. 436.
  • 15.
  • Autonomy and sensitive tolerance
  • Cultural Policy and the Entertainment Media
  • p. 449.
  • Cultural protection in the European media sector
  • p. 455.
  • Content quotas in European media law
  • p. 457.
  • Subsidies, state aid, and public service media
  • p. 464.
  • Trade and culture in the Uruguay Round
  • p. 471.
  • p. 43.
  • Trade and culture in the Doha Round
  • p. 474.
  • Trade and culture outside the WTO
  • p. 477
  • Positive and negative liberty
  • p. 47.
  • Freedom of expression and consequential reasoning
  • p. 49.
  • Media Law and Liberal Democracy
  • Liberalism, democracy, locality, and the media
  • p. 54.
  • Constitutionalism
  • p. 55.
  • The
  • First Amendment model
  • p. 57.
  • Proportionality analysis
  • p. 60.
  • Constitutional rights
  • 1.
  • p. 62.
  • Legal and regulatory convergence in the internet era
  • p. 64.
  • From broadcast to internet regulation
  • p. 67.
  • Platform neutrality
  • p. 69.
  • Market and state in media policy
  • p. 72.
  • 3.
  • The
  • Liberal Democracy and the Media in European and International Law
  • p. 75.
  • A
  • common treaty architecture
  • p. 79.
  • The
  • legitimate purposes and limits of the state
  • p. 81.
  • The
  • economic law and human rights law divide
  • New Media and the New State
  • p. 83.
  • Multilateral renewal after the Cold War
  • p. 84.
  • Multilateral obligations in the broadcast era
  • p. 90.
  • Deregulation in the internet era
  • p. 93.
  • The
  • structure of European and international media law
  • p. 96.
  • p. 9.
  • Objections to constitutionalism
  • p. 101.
  • From treaties to networks
  • p. 104.
  • The
  • pluralist perspective
  • p. 109.
  • Part II.
  • The
  • Media in European and International Legal Regimes
  • Technologies of liberty and equality
  • 4.
  • The
  • Media in the European Single Market
  • p. 115.
  • The
  • liberty to publish and free movement
  • p. 116.
  • Free movement of services and the Television Without Frontiers Directive
  • p. 119.
  • The
  • p. 17.
  • communications revolution and the new Directives
  • p. 122.
  • Protecting the interests of state and society in EU law
  • p. 128.
  • General exceptions to free movement
  • p. 135.
  • Audiovisual Media Services Directive and content standards
  • p. 139.
  • Content standards for on-demand and information society services
  • p. 142.
Control code
755218813
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xxxv, 495 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780191728518
Lccn
2011923114
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)755218813
Label
European and international media law : liberal democracy, trade, and the new media, Perry Keller
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Technologies of harm and inequality
  • Intervention in media markets and restrictions on the liberty to publish
  • p. 144.
  • Exporting European media law
  • p. 147.
  • 5.
  • International Trade in Media Goods and Services
  • p. 149.
  • Trade in goods and the liberty to publish
  • p. 155.
  • Trade in services and the liberty to publish
  • p. 21.
  • p. 158.
  • The
  • media in the Doha Round
  • p. 164.
  • The
  • media and general exceptions
  • p. 176.
  • 6.
  • The
  • Media in European and International Human Rights Law
  • Technologies of surveillance and control
  • p. 185.
  • Part I.
  • The
  • media in European human rights law
  • p. 185.
  • ECHR Article 10 and the media state relationship
  • p. 191.
  • The
  • margin of appreciation
  • p. 201.
  • p. 27.
  • Balancing rights and interests
  • p. 203.
  • Part II.
  • International human rights law and the media
  • p. 205.
  • Resisting liberal democracy
  • p. 212.
  • The
  • liberal democratic project-purposes and achievements
  • p. 218.
  • 2.
  • 7.
  • Jurisdiction and the Media
  • p. 224.
  • Territory, sovereignty, and jurisdiction
  • p. 225.
  • Radio broadcasting and the territorial state
  • p. 228.
  • Liberal democracy perspectives on broadcasting jurisdiction
  • p. 231.
  • Broadcasting jurisdiction and the Audiovisual Media Services Directive
  • The
  • p. 235.
  • International jurisdiction in the internet era
  • p. 238.
  • Jurisdiction and transatlantic differences
  • p. 240.
  • The
  • Hague judgments project
  • p. 248.
  • Territory, jurisdiction, and the internet
  • p. 251.
  • Media and the Liberal Democratic State
  • Part III.
  • Restricting the Liberty to Publish
  • 8.
  • Criticism of the State and Incitement to Violence
  • p. 261.
  • Criticism and incitement in the European Union
  • p. 265.
  • Criticism and incitement in the Council of Europe
  • p. 271.
  • Criticism and incitement in international trade law
  • p. 37.
  • p. 279.
  • Criticism and incitement in international human rights law
  • p. 282.
  • 9.
  • Access to State Information
  • p. 286.
  • Access to state information in the European Union
  • p. 289.
  • Access to state information in the Council of Europe
  • p. 295.
  • Liberalism and expression
  • Access to state information in international law
  • p. 302.
  • 10.
  • Information Privacy and Reputation
  • p. 307.
  • Information privacy and reputation in the European Union
  • p. 313.
  • Information privacy and reputation in the Council of Europe
  • p. 317.
  • Information privacy and reputation in international law
  • p. 38.
  • p. 327.
  • 11.
  • Protection of Personal Data
  • p. 331.
  • Data protection in the European Union
  • p. 334.
  • Data protection in the Council of Europe
  • p. 345.
  • Data protection in international law
  • p. 348.
  • Part I.
  • Harm and robust tolerance
  • 12.
  • Pornography and Violence
  • p. 356.
  • Pornographic, violent, and offensive content in the European Union
  • p. 361.
  • Council of Europe: offence, harm, and human rights
  • p. 368.
  • Pornography and violence in international law
  • p. 376.
  • 13.
  • p. 40.
  • Incitement to Hatred
  • p. 383.
  • Incitement to hatred in the European Union
  • p. 386.
  • Council of Europe, human rights, and incitement to hatred
  • p. 390.
  • Hate speech in international law
  • p. 395.
  • Part IV.
  • Intervention in Media Markets
  • Universality and value pluralism
  • 14.
  • Democracy, Pluralism, and the Media
  • p. 405.
  • Media pluralism in European public order
  • p. 412.
  • Sttuctural solutions for the protection of media pluralism
  • p. 416.
  • Structural pluralism beyond competition law
  • p. 419.
  • State monopolies and broadcast licensing
  • p. 41.
  • p. 423.
  • Impartiality and elections
  • p. 428.
  • Public service media
  • p. 431.
  • Media pluralism and intellectual property rights
  • p. 434.
  • Must carry, universal service, and network neutrality
  • p. 436.
  • 15.
  • Autonomy and sensitive tolerance
  • Cultural Policy and the Entertainment Media
  • p. 449.
  • Cultural protection in the European media sector
  • p. 455.
  • Content quotas in European media law
  • p. 457.
  • Subsidies, state aid, and public service media
  • p. 464.
  • Trade and culture in the Uruguay Round
  • p. 471.
  • p. 43.
  • Trade and culture in the Doha Round
  • p. 474.
  • Trade and culture outside the WTO
  • p. 477
  • Positive and negative liberty
  • p. 47.
  • Freedom of expression and consequential reasoning
  • p. 49.
  • Media Law and Liberal Democracy
  • Liberalism, democracy, locality, and the media
  • p. 54.
  • Constitutionalism
  • p. 55.
  • The
  • First Amendment model
  • p. 57.
  • Proportionality analysis
  • p. 60.
  • Constitutional rights
  • 1.
  • p. 62.
  • Legal and regulatory convergence in the internet era
  • p. 64.
  • From broadcast to internet regulation
  • p. 67.
  • Platform neutrality
  • p. 69.
  • Market and state in media policy
  • p. 72.
  • 3.
  • The
  • Liberal Democracy and the Media in European and International Law
  • p. 75.
  • A
  • common treaty architecture
  • p. 79.
  • The
  • legitimate purposes and limits of the state
  • p. 81.
  • The
  • economic law and human rights law divide
  • New Media and the New State
  • p. 83.
  • Multilateral renewal after the Cold War
  • p. 84.
  • Multilateral obligations in the broadcast era
  • p. 90.
  • Deregulation in the internet era
  • p. 93.
  • The
  • structure of European and international media law
  • p. 96.
  • p. 9.
  • Objections to constitutionalism
  • p. 101.
  • From treaties to networks
  • p. 104.
  • The
  • pluralist perspective
  • p. 109.
  • Part II.
  • The
  • Media in European and International Legal Regimes
  • Technologies of liberty and equality
  • 4.
  • The
  • Media in the European Single Market
  • p. 115.
  • The
  • liberty to publish and free movement
  • p. 116.
  • Free movement of services and the Television Without Frontiers Directive
  • p. 119.
  • The
  • p. 17.
  • communications revolution and the new Directives
  • p. 122.
  • Protecting the interests of state and society in EU law
  • p. 128.
  • General exceptions to free movement
  • p. 135.
  • Audiovisual Media Services Directive and content standards
  • p. 139.
  • Content standards for on-demand and information society services
  • p. 142.
Control code
755218813
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xxxv, 495 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780191728518
Lccn
2011923114
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)755218813

Library Locations

    • Pardee Legal Research CenterBorrow it
      5998 Alcalá Park, San Diego, CA, 92110-2492, US
      32.771471 -117.187496
Processing Feedback ...