Coverart for item
The Resource Freedom of religion, the First Amendment, and the Supreme Court : how the Court flunked history, Barry Adamson

Freedom of religion, the First Amendment, and the Supreme Court : how the Court flunked history, Barry Adamson

Label
Freedom of religion, the First Amendment, and the Supreme Court : how the Court flunked history
Title
Freedom of religion, the First Amendment, and the Supreme Court
Title remainder
how the Court flunked history
Statement of responsibility
Barry Adamson
Creator
Enacting jurisdiction
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • In colonial America, everyone knew the meaning of the terms "establishment" and "established church": an official, monopolistic governmental religion. The colonists also well knew the various negative attributes associated with the "established church," especially compelled financial support and attendance. Though some states had disestablished their churches before the American Revolution, every colonial state, except Pennsylvania and Rhode Island, had an established church at one time
  • Those who had suffered most, especially the Baptists of Virginia, demanded protection from a state-run religion in the form of a Bill of Rights. Virginia refused to ratify the Constitution unless this amendment was added, and in 1789, it became the First Amendment, stating, "Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion, nor prohibit the free exercise thereof."
  • In 1801, the Baptists of Danbury wrote Thomas Jefferson for additional aid. The established church of Connecticut did not allow them to hold office and denied them other rights. Jefferson wrote the famous "Wall of Separation" letter in which he described "a wall of separation between church and state." The Baptists were satisfied with this explanation, understanding the amendment to serve as a wall around the government, granting complete religious freedom to them
  • In contrast to the original intent of the First Amendment, as clarified by Thomas Jefferson, the United States Supreme Court, especially in the past sixty years, has been busy erecting walls around the churches and giving unfettered freedom to the government
  • Adamson explains in detail how the Court flunked history and confused the true meaning of the Establishment Clause, how they seized on a phrase not even in the Constitution, and how the justices have gradually built freedom of religion into a restraint of religious liberty. The Bill of Rights was a guarantee of freedom to the citizen. The court is busy building restraints to that freedom
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Adamson, Barry
Index
index present
LC call number
KF4783
LC item number
.A934 2008
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • United States
  • United States
  • Freedom of religion
  • Church and state
Label
Freedom of religion, the First Amendment, and the Supreme Court : how the Court flunked history, Barry Adamson
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 399-409) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • First Congress' consideration of a Bill of Rights : May to September, 1789
  • The
  • meaning of "meaning" : words mean today, and tomorrow, what they meant when written
  • The
  • author's own understanding : Congress's Contemporaneous Acts in 1789
  • The
  • author's own understanding : Congress's subsequent acts
  • A
  • meaning consistent with the states' own constitutions and laws in 1789
  • A
  • The
  • meaning consistent with amendments proposed by ratifying states
  • A
  • meaning consistent with Madison's passions
  • Irony of ironies : the Supreme Court extends the establishment clause's disablement to the states
  • Jefferson's metaphorical "wall of separation" : a wall of colloquial concoction
  • The
  • Supreme Court flunks First Amendment history and sends religion, God, and Christmas Underground
  • The
  • consequences of a rewritten history : the Everson aftermath
  • historical purpose an meaning of the First Amendment's establishment clause the Constitution's establishment clause
  • Religion and government in the 1700s : the "establishment"
  • The
  • states pre-constitution "Declarations of Rights"
  • The
  • states' demands for a "Bill of Rights" as part of the Constitution
  • The
Control code
172521790
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
422 pages
Isbn
9781589805200
Isbn Type
(hardcover : alk. paper)
Lccn
2007038063
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)172521790
Label
Freedom of religion, the First Amendment, and the Supreme Court : how the Court flunked history, Barry Adamson
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 399-409) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • First Congress' consideration of a Bill of Rights : May to September, 1789
  • The
  • meaning of "meaning" : words mean today, and tomorrow, what they meant when written
  • The
  • author's own understanding : Congress's Contemporaneous Acts in 1789
  • The
  • author's own understanding : Congress's subsequent acts
  • A
  • meaning consistent with the states' own constitutions and laws in 1789
  • A
  • The
  • meaning consistent with amendments proposed by ratifying states
  • A
  • meaning consistent with Madison's passions
  • Irony of ironies : the Supreme Court extends the establishment clause's disablement to the states
  • Jefferson's metaphorical "wall of separation" : a wall of colloquial concoction
  • The
  • Supreme Court flunks First Amendment history and sends religion, God, and Christmas Underground
  • The
  • consequences of a rewritten history : the Everson aftermath
  • historical purpose an meaning of the First Amendment's establishment clause the Constitution's establishment clause
  • Religion and government in the 1700s : the "establishment"
  • The
  • states pre-constitution "Declarations of Rights"
  • The
  • states' demands for a "Bill of Rights" as part of the Constitution
  • The
Control code
172521790
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
422 pages
Isbn
9781589805200
Isbn Type
(hardcover : alk. paper)
Lccn
2007038063
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)172521790

Library Locations

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