The Resource International migration law, Vincent Chetail

International migration law, Vincent Chetail

Label
International migration law
Title
International migration law
Statement of responsibility
Vincent Chetail
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
A unique and comprehensive overview on the numerous international rules governing migration, this text brings together and analyses the disparate norms and treaties within international and European law. It is a critical study of the role of international law in regulating the movement of persons, offering an ideal introduction to the field
Member of
Cataloging source
NLGGC
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/collectionName
Oxford Scholarly Authorities
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Chetail, Vincent,
Government publication
unknown if item is government publication
Index
index present
LC call number
K3275 ONLINE
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Emigration and immigration law
  • Freedom of movement (International law)
  • Emigration and immigration law
  • Freedom of movement (International law)
Label
International migration law, Vincent Chetail
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 405-444) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Part I.
  • 2.2.3.
  • Admission under customary international law
  • p. p. 119.
  • The principle of non-refoulement
  • p. p. 119.
  • The principle of family reunification
  • p. p. 124.
  • 2.2.4.
  • Immigration control and procedural guarantees under customary international law
  • p. p. 132.
  • Origins and Foundations of International Migration Law
  • The prohibition of arbitrary detention
  • p. p. 133.
  • Due process guarantees and the removal of undocumented migrants
  • p. p. 138.
  • Enforcement of immigration control and the right to human dignity
  • p. p. 142.
  • 2.3.
  • The Sojourn of Migrants
  • p. p. 144.
  • 2.3.1.
  • 1.
  • The principle of non-discrimination in customary international law
  • p. p. 145.
  • 2.3.2.
  • Nationality, immigration status, and the principle of nondiscrimination
  • p. p. 151.
  • The impact of the principle of non-discrimination on the human rights of migrants
  • p. p. 153.
  • The scope and content of the principle of non-discrimination with regard to economic and social rights of migrants
  • p. p. 157.
  • Part II.
  • History of International Migration Law
  • The Treaty Regimes of International Migration Law
  • 3.
  • Refugees
  • p. p. 169.
  • 3.1.
  • The Refugee Definition
  • p. p. 169.
  • 3.1.1.
  • The structure and rationale of the refugee definition
  • p. p. 169.
  • p. p. 18.
  • 3.1.2.
  • The limits of the refugee definition
  • p. p. 173.
  • 3.2.
  • The Refugee Status
  • p. p. 177.
  • 3.2.1.
  • The content of the refugee status
  • p. p. 177.
  • 3.2.2.
  • 1.1.
  • The ratio legis of the refugee status
  • p. p. 181.
  • 3.2.3.
  • The enlargement of the refugee status by human rights law
  • p. p. 184.
  • 3.3.
  • The Principle of Non-refoulement
  • p. p. 186.
  • 3.3.1.
  • The scope and content of the principle of non-refoulement: an overview
  • The Movement of Persons in the Doctrine of the Law of Nations (16th Century to 18thCentury)
  • p. p. 186.
  • 3.3.2.
  • The relations between asylum and non-refoulement
  • p. p. 190.
  • 3.3.3.
  • The principle of non-refoulement under human rights law
  • p. p. 194.
  • 4.
  • Migrant Workers
  • p. p. 200.
  • p. p. 19.
  • 4.1.
  • The ILO's Conventions on Migrant Workers
  • p. p. 200.
  • 4.1.1.
  • The definition of migrant workers
  • p. p. 201.
  • 4.1.2.
  • The regulation of labour migration: an open-ended framework of inter-state cooperation
  • p. p. 202.
  • Inter-state cooperation on regular migration
  • 1.1.1.
  • p. p. 203.
  • Inter-state cooperation on irregular migration
  • p. p. 205.
  • 4.1.3.
  • The international protection of migrant workers
  • p. p. 208.
  • The basic human rights of all migrant workers
  • p. p. 208.
  • The rights of migrant workers in a regular situation
  • p. p. 210.
  • The right of communication between peoples by Vitoria and Grotius 19 Vitoria and the right of communication
  • 4.1.4.
  • The quest for ratifications and the parallel application of generals labour conventions
  • p. p. 212.
  • The legal obstacles to ratification
  • p. p. 213.
  • The continuing application of general labour conventions
  • p. p. 214.
  • 4.2.
  • The International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families
  • p. p. 219.
  • Demystifying Migration: Facts and Figures
  • p. p. 19.
  • 4.2.1.
  • The definition of migrant workers
  • p. p. 219.
  • The scope of the UN definition of migrant workers
  • p. p. 220.
  • Family members of migrant workers
  • p. p. 223.
  • Refugees, stateless persons, and the definition of migrant workers
  • p. p. 224.
  • 4.2.2.
  • Grotius and the law of hospitality
  • The regulation of labour migration under the ICRMW: between cooperation and constraint
  • p. p. 227.
  • The multilateral framework of inter-state cooperation
  • p. p. 228.
  • The rights of migrant workers as a limit to migration control
  • p. p. 230.
  • 4.2.3.
  • The international protection of migrant workers
  • p. p. 234.
  • The normative commonalities between the ICRMW and general human rights conventions
  • p. p. 23.
  • p. p. 235.
  • 4.2.4.
  • The ratification of the ICRMW and the long road to universality
  • p. p. 238.
  • The obstacles to ratification
  • p. p. 240.
  • The politicization of non-ratification
  • p. p. 244.
  • Looking beyond Western politics of non-ratification
  • p. p. 247.
  • 1.1.2.
  • 5.
  • Trafficked and Smuggled Migrants
  • p. p. 251.
  • 5.1.
  • The Definitions of Trafficking and Smuggling
  • p. p. 252.
  • 5.1.1.
  • The constitutive elements of trafficking in persons
  • p. p. 252.
  • 5.1.2.
  • State sovereignty and the admission of aliens by Pufendorf and Wolff
  • The constitutive elements of the smuggling of migrants
  • p. p. 255.
  • 5.1.3.
  • The overlap between the trafficking in persons and the smuggling of migrants
  • p. p. 258.
  • 5.2.
  • The Fight against Trafficking and Smuggling
  • p. p. 262.
  • 5.2.1.
  • The criminalization of trafficking and smuggling
  • p. p. 26.
  • p. p. 262.
  • 5.2.2.
  • The reinforcement of immigration control
  • p. p. 266.
  • 5.3.
  • The International Protection of Trafficked Persons and Smuggled Migrants
  • p. p. 271.
  • 5.3.1.
  • The limits of protection in the Palermo Protocols
  • p. p. 271.
  • Pufendorf and the reason of state
  • 5.3.2.
  • The saving clauses of the Palermo Protocols: a case for an integrated approach to international migration law
  • p. p. 273.
  • Part III.
  • Soft Law and Global Migration Governance
  • 6.
  • The Functions and Evolution of Soft Law in Global Migration Governance
  • p. p. 283.
  • 6.1.
  • The Functions of Soft Law in International Migration Law
  • p. p. 26.
  • p. p. 284.
  • 6.1.1.
  • Definition of soft law
  • p. p. 284.
  • 6.1.2.
  • Soft law as a support to hard law
  • p. p. 286.
  • 6.1.3.
  • Soft law as an alternative to hard law
  • p. p. 290.
  • Wolff and the patrimonial state
  • 6.1.4.
  • Soft law as a double-edged sword
  • p. p. 292.
  • The perils of soft law
  • p. p. 292.
  • The promises of soft law
  • p. p. 294.
  • 6.2.
  • Soft Law as a Catalyst of Global Migration Governance: The Long Road towards a Comprehensive and Balanced Approach
  • p. p. 300.
  • p. p. 28.
  • 6.2.1.
  • Experimentation and expansion of informal dialogue and inter-state cooperation: 1994-2005
  • p. p. 300.
  • The rise of mini-multilateralism and inter-state dialogue outside the UN
  • p. p. 302.
  • The increased involvement of UN specialized institutions
  • p. p. 307.
  • 6.2.2.
  • The revival of the UN and the migration-development nexus: 2006-2015
  • p. p. 310.
  • p. p. 2.
  • 1.1.3.
  • The rise of the General Assembly as a forum of inter-state dialogue
  • p. p. 311.
  • The progressive enlargement of the international agenda beyond the migration-development nexus
  • p. p. 317.
  • 6.2.3.
  • The New York Declaration and the UN Global Compacts: 2016-2018
  • p. p. 322.
  • The New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants
  • p. p. 323.
  • The entry of IOM into the UN system
  • The synthesis of Vattel: sovereignty versus necessity
  • p. p. 325.
  • The drafting process of the UN Global Compacts for Migration and Refugees
  • p. p. 328.
  • The Global Compact for Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration
  • p. p. 330.
  • The Global Compact on Refugees
  • p. p. 336.
  • 7.
  • The Architecture of Global Migration Governance
  • p. p. 340.
  • p. p. 31.
  • 7.1.
  • The Institutional Design of Global Migration Governance
  • p. p. 341.
  • 7.1.1.
  • The quest for a world migration organization
  • p. p. 341.
  • 7.1.2.
  • A deconstructivist architecture of global migration governance
  • p. p. 345.
  • 7.2.
  • Emigration and immigration by Vattel
  • The Pillars of Global Migration Governance
  • p. p. 348.
  • 7.2.1.
  • The intergovernmental pillar of global migration governance: the Global Forum on Migration and Development
  • p. p. 349.
  • 7.2.2.
  • The inter-agency pillar of global migration governance: the Global Migration Group
  • p. p. 354.
  • 7.3.
  • IOM and UNHCR: The Building Blocks of Global Migration Governance
  • p. p. 32.
  • p. p. 360. --
  • Innocent passage and the dual law of nations
  • p. p. 35.
  • Necessity: a right to illegal entry
  • p. p. 36.
  • 1.2.
  • Dispelling the Complexity of International Law and Migration
  • The Rise and Fall of Free Movement (19th Century to 20th Century)
  • p. p. 38.
  • 1.2.1.
  • The climax of free movement in the 19th century
  • p. p. 39.
  • Free movement and sovereignty in the legal doctrine of the 19th century
  • p. p. 41.
  • The codification of the right to admission by the Institute of International Law
  • p. p. 45.
  • 1.2.2.
  • p. p. 5.
  • The invention of immigration control and the turn of the 20th century
  • p. p. 46.
  • 1.2.3.
  • Inter-state cooperation and the emergence of global migration governance
  • p. p. 52.
  • 1.3.
  • The Human Rights of Migrants: From Minimum Standards to Fundamental Rights (20th Century to 21st Century)
  • p. p. 59.
  • 1.3.1.
  • The origins of the international minimum standard in the law of state responsibility
  • International Migration Law as a Global Framework of Analysis
  • p. p. 59.
  • 1.3.2.
  • The emergence of international human rights law as the primary source of protection for migrants
  • p. p. 65.
  • 1.3.3.
  • The international protection of migrants: the epitome of human rights
  • p. p. 68.
  • 2.
  • Founding Principles of International Migration Law
  • p. p. 76.
  • p. p. 7.
  • 2.1.
  • Departure of Migrants
  • p. p. 77.
  • 2.1.1.
  • The international recognition of the right to leave any country
  • p. p. 78.
  • 2.1.2.
  • The right to leave any country in customary international law
  • p. p. 85.
  • 2.2.
  • Objective and Structure of the Textbook
  • Admission of Migrants
  • p. p. 92.
  • 2.2.1.
  • The right to enter under universal treaty law
  • p. p. 93.
  • The right to enter under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
  • p. p. 93.
  • The movement of persons supplying services under the General Agreement on Trade in Services
  • p. p. 95.
  • 2.2.2.
  • p. p. 12.
  • The right to free movement under regional treaty law
  • p. p. 97.
  • Overview and typology of regional treaty regimes on the free movement of persons
  • p. p. 98.
  • Freedom of movement in Europe
  • p. p. 103.
  • Freedom of movement in Africa
  • p. p. 109.
  • Freedom of movement in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • p. p. 116.
  • The ratione materiae mandates of UNHCR and IOM
  • p. p. 371.
  • The schizophrenic stance of UNHCR and IOM towards states
  • p. p. 378.
  • 7.3.3.
  • The dividing line between UNHCR and IOM: normative and supervisory functions
  • p. p. 381.
  • UNHCR: a normative and supervisory organization?
  • p. p. 382.
  • IOM: a non-normative organization?
  • 7.3.1.
  • p. p. 392
  • The standing and governing structure of UNHCR and IOM within the UN system
  • p. p. 361.
  • 7.3.2.
  • The blurred division of labour between UNHCR and IOM
  • p. p. 368.
  • The ratione personae mandates of UNHCR and IOM
  • p. p. 368.
Control code
1100767857
Extent
1 online resource (444 pages)
Form of item
online
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1100767857
Label
International migration law, Vincent Chetail
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 405-444) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Part I.
  • 2.2.3.
  • Admission under customary international law
  • p. p. 119.
  • The principle of non-refoulement
  • p. p. 119.
  • The principle of family reunification
  • p. p. 124.
  • 2.2.4.
  • Immigration control and procedural guarantees under customary international law
  • p. p. 132.
  • Origins and Foundations of International Migration Law
  • The prohibition of arbitrary detention
  • p. p. 133.
  • Due process guarantees and the removal of undocumented migrants
  • p. p. 138.
  • Enforcement of immigration control and the right to human dignity
  • p. p. 142.
  • 2.3.
  • The Sojourn of Migrants
  • p. p. 144.
  • 2.3.1.
  • 1.
  • The principle of non-discrimination in customary international law
  • p. p. 145.
  • 2.3.2.
  • Nationality, immigration status, and the principle of nondiscrimination
  • p. p. 151.
  • The impact of the principle of non-discrimination on the human rights of migrants
  • p. p. 153.
  • The scope and content of the principle of non-discrimination with regard to economic and social rights of migrants
  • p. p. 157.
  • Part II.
  • History of International Migration Law
  • The Treaty Regimes of International Migration Law
  • 3.
  • Refugees
  • p. p. 169.
  • 3.1.
  • The Refugee Definition
  • p. p. 169.
  • 3.1.1.
  • The structure and rationale of the refugee definition
  • p. p. 169.
  • p. p. 18.
  • 3.1.2.
  • The limits of the refugee definition
  • p. p. 173.
  • 3.2.
  • The Refugee Status
  • p. p. 177.
  • 3.2.1.
  • The content of the refugee status
  • p. p. 177.
  • 3.2.2.
  • 1.1.
  • The ratio legis of the refugee status
  • p. p. 181.
  • 3.2.3.
  • The enlargement of the refugee status by human rights law
  • p. p. 184.
  • 3.3.
  • The Principle of Non-refoulement
  • p. p. 186.
  • 3.3.1.
  • The scope and content of the principle of non-refoulement: an overview
  • The Movement of Persons in the Doctrine of the Law of Nations (16th Century to 18thCentury)
  • p. p. 186.
  • 3.3.2.
  • The relations between asylum and non-refoulement
  • p. p. 190.
  • 3.3.3.
  • The principle of non-refoulement under human rights law
  • p. p. 194.
  • 4.
  • Migrant Workers
  • p. p. 200.
  • p. p. 19.
  • 4.1.
  • The ILO's Conventions on Migrant Workers
  • p. p. 200.
  • 4.1.1.
  • The definition of migrant workers
  • p. p. 201.
  • 4.1.2.
  • The regulation of labour migration: an open-ended framework of inter-state cooperation
  • p. p. 202.
  • Inter-state cooperation on regular migration
  • 1.1.1.
  • p. p. 203.
  • Inter-state cooperation on irregular migration
  • p. p. 205.
  • 4.1.3.
  • The international protection of migrant workers
  • p. p. 208.
  • The basic human rights of all migrant workers
  • p. p. 208.
  • The rights of migrant workers in a regular situation
  • p. p. 210.
  • The right of communication between peoples by Vitoria and Grotius 19 Vitoria and the right of communication
  • 4.1.4.
  • The quest for ratifications and the parallel application of generals labour conventions
  • p. p. 212.
  • The legal obstacles to ratification
  • p. p. 213.
  • The continuing application of general labour conventions
  • p. p. 214.
  • 4.2.
  • The International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families
  • p. p. 219.
  • Demystifying Migration: Facts and Figures
  • p. p. 19.
  • 4.2.1.
  • The definition of migrant workers
  • p. p. 219.
  • The scope of the UN definition of migrant workers
  • p. p. 220.
  • Family members of migrant workers
  • p. p. 223.
  • Refugees, stateless persons, and the definition of migrant workers
  • p. p. 224.
  • 4.2.2.
  • Grotius and the law of hospitality
  • The regulation of labour migration under the ICRMW: between cooperation and constraint
  • p. p. 227.
  • The multilateral framework of inter-state cooperation
  • p. p. 228.
  • The rights of migrant workers as a limit to migration control
  • p. p. 230.
  • 4.2.3.
  • The international protection of migrant workers
  • p. p. 234.
  • The normative commonalities between the ICRMW and general human rights conventions
  • p. p. 23.
  • p. p. 235.
  • 4.2.4.
  • The ratification of the ICRMW and the long road to universality
  • p. p. 238.
  • The obstacles to ratification
  • p. p. 240.
  • The politicization of non-ratification
  • p. p. 244.
  • Looking beyond Western politics of non-ratification
  • p. p. 247.
  • 1.1.2.
  • 5.
  • Trafficked and Smuggled Migrants
  • p. p. 251.
  • 5.1.
  • The Definitions of Trafficking and Smuggling
  • p. p. 252.
  • 5.1.1.
  • The constitutive elements of trafficking in persons
  • p. p. 252.
  • 5.1.2.
  • State sovereignty and the admission of aliens by Pufendorf and Wolff
  • The constitutive elements of the smuggling of migrants
  • p. p. 255.
  • 5.1.3.
  • The overlap between the trafficking in persons and the smuggling of migrants
  • p. p. 258.
  • 5.2.
  • The Fight against Trafficking and Smuggling
  • p. p. 262.
  • 5.2.1.
  • The criminalization of trafficking and smuggling
  • p. p. 26.
  • p. p. 262.
  • 5.2.2.
  • The reinforcement of immigration control
  • p. p. 266.
  • 5.3.
  • The International Protection of Trafficked Persons and Smuggled Migrants
  • p. p. 271.
  • 5.3.1.
  • The limits of protection in the Palermo Protocols
  • p. p. 271.
  • Pufendorf and the reason of state
  • 5.3.2.
  • The saving clauses of the Palermo Protocols: a case for an integrated approach to international migration law
  • p. p. 273.
  • Part III.
  • Soft Law and Global Migration Governance
  • 6.
  • The Functions and Evolution of Soft Law in Global Migration Governance
  • p. p. 283.
  • 6.1.
  • The Functions of Soft Law in International Migration Law
  • p. p. 26.
  • p. p. 284.
  • 6.1.1.
  • Definition of soft law
  • p. p. 284.
  • 6.1.2.
  • Soft law as a support to hard law
  • p. p. 286.
  • 6.1.3.
  • Soft law as an alternative to hard law
  • p. p. 290.
  • Wolff and the patrimonial state
  • 6.1.4.
  • Soft law as a double-edged sword
  • p. p. 292.
  • The perils of soft law
  • p. p. 292.
  • The promises of soft law
  • p. p. 294.
  • 6.2.
  • Soft Law as a Catalyst of Global Migration Governance: The Long Road towards a Comprehensive and Balanced Approach
  • p. p. 300.
  • p. p. 28.
  • 6.2.1.
  • Experimentation and expansion of informal dialogue and inter-state cooperation: 1994-2005
  • p. p. 300.
  • The rise of mini-multilateralism and inter-state dialogue outside the UN
  • p. p. 302.
  • The increased involvement of UN specialized institutions
  • p. p. 307.
  • 6.2.2.
  • The revival of the UN and the migration-development nexus: 2006-2015
  • p. p. 310.
  • p. p. 2.
  • 1.1.3.
  • The rise of the General Assembly as a forum of inter-state dialogue
  • p. p. 311.
  • The progressive enlargement of the international agenda beyond the migration-development nexus
  • p. p. 317.
  • 6.2.3.
  • The New York Declaration and the UN Global Compacts: 2016-2018
  • p. p. 322.
  • The New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants
  • p. p. 323.
  • The entry of IOM into the UN system
  • The synthesis of Vattel: sovereignty versus necessity
  • p. p. 325.
  • The drafting process of the UN Global Compacts for Migration and Refugees
  • p. p. 328.
  • The Global Compact for Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration
  • p. p. 330.
  • The Global Compact on Refugees
  • p. p. 336.
  • 7.
  • The Architecture of Global Migration Governance
  • p. p. 340.
  • p. p. 31.
  • 7.1.
  • The Institutional Design of Global Migration Governance
  • p. p. 341.
  • 7.1.1.
  • The quest for a world migration organization
  • p. p. 341.
  • 7.1.2.
  • A deconstructivist architecture of global migration governance
  • p. p. 345.
  • 7.2.
  • Emigration and immigration by Vattel
  • The Pillars of Global Migration Governance
  • p. p. 348.
  • 7.2.1.
  • The intergovernmental pillar of global migration governance: the Global Forum on Migration and Development
  • p. p. 349.
  • 7.2.2.
  • The inter-agency pillar of global migration governance: the Global Migration Group
  • p. p. 354.
  • 7.3.
  • IOM and UNHCR: The Building Blocks of Global Migration Governance
  • p. p. 32.
  • p. p. 360. --
  • Innocent passage and the dual law of nations
  • p. p. 35.
  • Necessity: a right to illegal entry
  • p. p. 36.
  • 1.2.
  • Dispelling the Complexity of International Law and Migration
  • The Rise and Fall of Free Movement (19th Century to 20th Century)
  • p. p. 38.
  • 1.2.1.
  • The climax of free movement in the 19th century
  • p. p. 39.
  • Free movement and sovereignty in the legal doctrine of the 19th century
  • p. p. 41.
  • The codification of the right to admission by the Institute of International Law
  • p. p. 45.
  • 1.2.2.
  • p. p. 5.
  • The invention of immigration control and the turn of the 20th century
  • p. p. 46.
  • 1.2.3.
  • Inter-state cooperation and the emergence of global migration governance
  • p. p. 52.
  • 1.3.
  • The Human Rights of Migrants: From Minimum Standards to Fundamental Rights (20th Century to 21st Century)
  • p. p. 59.
  • 1.3.1.
  • The origins of the international minimum standard in the law of state responsibility
  • International Migration Law as a Global Framework of Analysis
  • p. p. 59.
  • 1.3.2.
  • The emergence of international human rights law as the primary source of protection for migrants
  • p. p. 65.
  • 1.3.3.
  • The international protection of migrants: the epitome of human rights
  • p. p. 68.
  • 2.
  • Founding Principles of International Migration Law
  • p. p. 76.
  • p. p. 7.
  • 2.1.
  • Departure of Migrants
  • p. p. 77.
  • 2.1.1.
  • The international recognition of the right to leave any country
  • p. p. 78.
  • 2.1.2.
  • The right to leave any country in customary international law
  • p. p. 85.
  • 2.2.
  • Objective and Structure of the Textbook
  • Admission of Migrants
  • p. p. 92.
  • 2.2.1.
  • The right to enter under universal treaty law
  • p. p. 93.
  • The right to enter under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
  • p. p. 93.
  • The movement of persons supplying services under the General Agreement on Trade in Services
  • p. p. 95.
  • 2.2.2.
  • p. p. 12.
  • The right to free movement under regional treaty law
  • p. p. 97.
  • Overview and typology of regional treaty regimes on the free movement of persons
  • p. p. 98.
  • Freedom of movement in Europe
  • p. p. 103.
  • Freedom of movement in Africa
  • p. p. 109.
  • Freedom of movement in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • p. p. 116.
  • The ratione materiae mandates of UNHCR and IOM
  • p. p. 371.
  • The schizophrenic stance of UNHCR and IOM towards states
  • p. p. 378.
  • 7.3.3.
  • The dividing line between UNHCR and IOM: normative and supervisory functions
  • p. p. 381.
  • UNHCR: a normative and supervisory organization?
  • p. p. 382.
  • IOM: a non-normative organization?
  • 7.3.1.
  • p. p. 392
  • The standing and governing structure of UNHCR and IOM within the UN system
  • p. p. 361.
  • 7.3.2.
  • The blurred division of labour between UNHCR and IOM
  • p. p. 368.
  • The ratione personae mandates of UNHCR and IOM
  • p. p. 368.
Control code
1100767857
Extent
1 online resource (444 pages)
Form of item
online
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1100767857

Library Locations

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