Coverart for item
The Resource Irony and the modern theatre, William Storm, (electronic resource)

Irony and the modern theatre, William Storm, (electronic resource)

Label
Irony and the modern theatre
Title
Irony and the modern theatre
Statement of responsibility
William Storm
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • "Irony and theatre share intimate kinships, not only regarding dramatic conflict, dialectic or wittiness, but also scenic structure and the verbal or situational ironies that typically mark theatrical speech and action. Yet irony today, in aesthetic, literary and philosophical contexts especially, is often regarded with skepticism - as ungraspable, or elusive to the point of confounding. Countering this tendency, Storm advocates a wide-angle view of this master trope, exploring the ironic in major works by playwrights including Chekhov, Pirandello and Brecht, and in notable relation to well-known representative characters in drama from Ibsen's Halvard Solness to Stoppard's Septimus Hodge and Wasserstein's Heidi Holland. To the degree that irony is existential, its presence in the theatre relates directly to the circumstances and the expressiveness of the characters on stage. This study investigates how these key figures enact, embody, represent and personify the ironic in myriad situations in the modern and contemporary theatre"--
  • "Irony, in its contrariness, has gained a reputation for indeterminacy, for being all but ungraspable except perhaps in the most traditional contexts of wittiness, paradox, the assumption of an opposite, or a perspective of stylish but world-weary commentary. Irony in the more complicated view can now be confounding, a perspective that has become more pervasive, or at least more presumed, in connection with postmodernist or deconstructive assumptions regarding the disassociative properties of language in particular. Irony does, in fact, imply opposition, a consistent if at times hidden presence of the alternate view; and when such alternation is reiterated or compounded, the contrary properties of the trope become correspondingly more manifest, leading potentially to progressive negation or even self-cancellation"--
Member of
Assigning source
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1949-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Storm, William
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
ProQuest (Firm)
Series statement
Cambridge studies in modern theatre
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Irony in literature
  • Drama
  • Drama
Label
Irony and the modern theatre, William Storm, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. Irony personified: Ibsen and The Master Builder; 2. The character of irony in Chekhov; 3. Irony and dialectic: Shaw's Candida; 4. Pirandello's 'father' - and Brecht's 'mother'; 5. Absurdist irony: Ionesco's 'anti-play'; 6. 'Ironist first-class': Stoppard's Arcadia; 7. American ironies: Wasserstein and Kushner; 8. Irony's theatre
Control code
EBC691990
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
x, 256 p
Form of item
  • online
  • electronic
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, MI : ProQuest, 2015. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest affiliated libraries
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC691990
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL691990
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10470685
  • (CaONFJC)MIL311285
  • (OCoLC)726734812
Label
Irony and the modern theatre, William Storm, (electronic resource)
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. Irony personified: Ibsen and The Master Builder; 2. The character of irony in Chekhov; 3. Irony and dialectic: Shaw's Candida; 4. Pirandello's 'father' - and Brecht's 'mother'; 5. Absurdist irony: Ionesco's 'anti-play'; 6. 'Ironist first-class': Stoppard's Arcadia; 7. American ironies: Wasserstein and Kushner; 8. Irony's theatre
Control code
EBC691990
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
x, 256 p
Form of item
  • online
  • electronic
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, MI : ProQuest, 2015. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest affiliated libraries
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC691990
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL691990
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10470685
  • (CaONFJC)MIL311285
  • (OCoLC)726734812

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