Coverart for item
The Resource Made to play house : dolls and the commercialization of American girlhood, 1830-1930, Miriam Formanek-Brunell

Made to play house : dolls and the commercialization of American girlhood, 1830-1930, Miriam Formanek-Brunell

Label
Made to play house : dolls and the commercialization of American girlhood, 1830-1930
Title
Made to play house
Title remainder
dolls and the commercialization of American girlhood, 1830-1930
Statement of responsibility
Miriam Formanek-Brunell
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"Dolls have long been perceived as symbols of domesticity, maternity, and materialism, designed by men and loved by girls who wanted to "play house." In this engagingly written and illustrated social history of the American doll industry, Miriam Formanek-Brunell shows that this has not always been the case. Drawing on a wide variety of contemporary sources - including popular magazines advertising, autobiographies, juvenile literature, patents, photographs, and the dolls themselves - Formanek-Brunell traces the history of the doll industry back to its beginnings, a time when American men, women, and girls each claimed the right to construct dolls and gender." "Formanek-Brunell describes how dolls and doll play changed over time: antebellum rag dolls taught sewing skills; Gilded Age fashion dolls inculcated formal social rituals; Progressive Era dolls promoted health and active play; and the realistic baby dolls of the 1920s fostered girls' maternal impulses. She discusses how the aesthetic values and business methods of women dollmakers differed from those of their male counterpart, and she describes, for example, Martha Chase, who made America's first soft, sanitary cloth dolls, and Rose O'Neill, inventor of the kewpie doll. According to Formanek-Brunell, although American businessmen ultimately dominated the industry with dolls they marketed as symbols of an idealized feminine domesticity, business-women presented an alternative vision of gender for both girls and boys through a variety of dolls they manufactured themselves."--Jacket
Cataloging source
JSTOR
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1955-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Forman-Brunell, Miriam
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Doll industry
  • Doll industry
  • United States
  • Poppen (speelgoed)
  • Meisjes
  • Vercommercialisering
  • Bedrijven
  • SOCIAL SCIENCE / General
Label
Made to play house : dolls and the commercialization of American girlhood, 1830-1930, Miriam Formanek-Brunell
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 189-228) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Ch. 1. The Politics of Dollhood in Nineteenth-Century America -- Ch. 2. Masculinity, Technology, and the Doll Economy, 1860-1906 -- Ch. 3. In the Dolls' House: The Material Maternalism of Martha Chase, 1889-1914 -- Ch. 4. Marketing a Campbell Kids Culture: Engendering New Kid Dolls, 1902-1914 -- Ch. 5. New Women and Talismen: Rose O'Neill and the Kewpies, 1909-1914 -- Ch. 6. Forging the Modern American Doll Industry, 1914-1929 -- Ch. 7. Children's Day: Constructing a Consumer Culture for Girls, 1900-1930 -- Epilogue: Agents or Agency: Dolls in Modern America Since 1930
Control code
ocn956711923
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 233 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780300159370
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
Other physical details
illustrations
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctt1dst4sx
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)956711923
Label
Made to play house : dolls and the commercialization of American girlhood, 1830-1930, Miriam Formanek-Brunell
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 189-228) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Ch. 1. The Politics of Dollhood in Nineteenth-Century America -- Ch. 2. Masculinity, Technology, and the Doll Economy, 1860-1906 -- Ch. 3. In the Dolls' House: The Material Maternalism of Martha Chase, 1889-1914 -- Ch. 4. Marketing a Campbell Kids Culture: Engendering New Kid Dolls, 1902-1914 -- Ch. 5. New Women and Talismen: Rose O'Neill and the Kewpies, 1909-1914 -- Ch. 6. Forging the Modern American Doll Industry, 1914-1929 -- Ch. 7. Children's Day: Constructing a Consumer Culture for Girls, 1900-1930 -- Epilogue: Agents or Agency: Dolls in Modern America Since 1930
Control code
ocn956711923
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 233 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780300159370
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
Other physical details
illustrations
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctt1dst4sx
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)956711923

Library Locations

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      32.771354 -117.193327
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