The Resource Nonstrategic nuclear weapons, Amy F. Woolf

Nonstrategic nuclear weapons, Amy F. Woolf

Label
Nonstrategic nuclear weapons
Title
Nonstrategic nuclear weapons
Statement of responsibility
Amy F. Woolf
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"During the Cold War, the United States and Soviet Union both deployed thousands of 'nonstrategic' nuclear weapons that were intended to be used in support of troops in the field during a conflict. These included nuclear mines; artillery; short, medium, and long-range ballistic missiles; cruise missiles; and gravity bombs. In contrast with the longer-range 'strategic' nuclear weapons, these weapons had a lower profile in policy debates and arms control negotiations. At the end of the 1980s, before the demise of the Soviet Union, each nation still had thousands of these weapons deployed with their troops in the field, aboard naval vessels, and on aircraft. In 1991, both the United States and Soviet Union announced that they would withdraw most and eliminate many of their nonstrategic nuclear weapons. The United States now retains approximately 1,100 nonstrategic nuclear weapons, with a few hundred deployed with aircraft in Europe and the remaining stored in the United States. Estimates vary, but experts believe Russia still has between 2,000 and 6,000 warheads for nonstrategic nuclear weapons in its arsenal. The Bush Administration indicated that nuclear weapons remained essential to U.S. national security interests, but it did quietly redeploy and remove some of the nuclear weapons deployed in Europe. In addition, Russia has increased its reliance on nuclear weapons in its national security concept. Some analysts argue that Russia has backed away from its commitments from 1991 and may develop and deploy new types of nonstrategic nuclear weapons. Analysts have identified a number of issues with the continued deployment of U.S. and Russian nonstrategic nuclear weapons. These include questions about the safety and security of Russia's weapons and the possibility that some might be lost, stolen, or sold to another nation or group; questions about the role of these weapons in U.S. and Russian security policy, and the likelihood that either nation might use these weapons in a regional contingency with a non-nuclear nation; questions about the role that these weapons play in NATO policy and whether there is a continuing need for the United States to deploy these weapons at bases overseas; and questions about the relationship between nonstrategic nuclear weapons and U.S. nonproliferation policy, particularly whether a U.S. policy that views these weapons as a militarily useful tool might encourage other nations to acquire their own nuclear weapons, or at least complicate U.S. policy to discourage such acquisition. Some argue that these weapons do not create any problems and the United States should not alter its policy. Others, however, argue that the United States should reduce its reliance on these weapons and encourage Russia to do the same. Many have suggested that the United States and Russia expand efforts to cooperate on ensuring the safe and secure storage and elimination of these weapons, possibly by negotiating an arms control treaty that would limit these weapons and allow for increased transparency in monitoring their deployment and elimination. Others have suggested that any potential new U.S.-Russian arms control treaty count both strategic and nonstrategic nuclear weapons. This might encourage reductions or the elimination of these weapons. The 111th Congress may review some of these proposals."
Member of
Cataloging source
DTICE
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/collectionName
HeinOnline U.S. Congressional Documents Library
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Woolf, Amy F
Index
no index present
LC call number
UA23
LC item number
.W755 2010 ONLINE
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Library of Congress
Series statement
CRS report for Congress
Series volume
RL32572
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Nuclear weapons
  • Nuclear weapons
  • Nuclear weapons
  • Nuclear nonproliferation
  • Nuclear arms control
  • National security
  • National security
  • National security
  • Nuclear arms control
  • Nuclear nonproliferation
  • Nuclear weapons
  • Russia (Federation)
  • Soviet Union
  • United States
Target audience
adult
Label
Nonstrategic nuclear weapons, Amy F. Woolf
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Title from PDF title page (DTIC, viewed July 28, 2010)
  • "January 14, 2010."
  • Congressional rept
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
574515838
Extent
1 online resource (28 pages)
Form of item
online
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)574515838
Label
Nonstrategic nuclear weapons, Amy F. Woolf
Publication
Note
  • Title from PDF title page (DTIC, viewed July 28, 2010)
  • "January 14, 2010."
  • Congressional rept
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
574515838
Extent
1 online resource (28 pages)
Form of item
online
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)574515838

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