Coverart for item
The Resource Ojibwe discourse markers, Brendan Fairbanks

Ojibwe discourse markers, Brendan Fairbanks

Label
Ojibwe discourse markers
Title
Ojibwe discourse markers
Statement of responsibility
Brendan Fairbanks
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • "Brendan Fairbanks examines the challenging subject of discourse markers in Ojibwe, one of the many indigenous languages in the Algonquian family. Mille Lacs elder Jim Clark once described the discourse markers as "little bugs that are holding on for dear life." For example, discourse markers such as mii and gosha exist only on the periphery of sentences to provide either cohesion or nuance to utterances. Fairbanks focuses on the discourse markers that are the most ubiquitous and that exist most commonly within Ojibwe texts. Much of the research on Algonquian languages has concentrated primarily on the core morphological and syntactical characteristics of their sentence structure. Fairbanks restricts his study to markers that are far more elusive and difficult in terms of semantic ambiguity and their contribution to sentences and Ojibwe discourse. Ojibwe Discourse Markers is a remarkable study that interprets and describes the Ojibwe language in its broader theoretical concerns in the field of linguistics. With a scholarly and pedagogical introductory chapter and a glossary of technical terms, this book will be useful to instructors and students of Ojibwe as a second language in language revival and maintenance programs."--
  • "An exploration of the uninflected grammatical particles that are ubiquitous among Native speakers of the Ojibwe language and that exist in Ojibwe texts"--
Assigning source
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Fairbanks, Brendan
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Ojibwa language
  • Discourse markers
  • Ojibwa language
  • Ojibwa language
  • Ojibwa language
  • Ojibwa language
  • Ojibwa Indians
  • SOCIAL SCIENCE
  • LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES
  • FOREIGN LANGUAGE STUDY
  • Discourse markers
  • Ojibwa Indians
  • Ojibwa language
  • Ojibwa language
Label
Ojibwe discourse markers, Brendan Fairbanks
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Methodology
  • goda
  • 3.2.2.7.
  • naa
  • 3.2.2.7.1.
  • Second-position discourse clusters with naa
  • 4.
  • Conjunct order as a discourse-marking device
  • 4.1.
  • Sentence-level use of conjuncts
  • 4.1.1.
  • 1.4.
  • Dependent clauses
  • 4.1.2.
  • Temporal immediacy and the connective feature of the conjunct
  • 4.1.3.
  • Situational immediacy
  • 4.2.
  • Discourse use of conjuncts
  • 5.
  • Conclusion
  • Orthography
  • 2.
  • What is a discourse marker?
  • 2.1.
  • Schiffrin's definition of discourse markers
  • 2.2.
  • Relevance theorists' view of discourse markers
  • 2.3.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Cross-linguistic data
  • 2.3.1.
  • Position
  • 2.3.2.
  • Clitics and affixes
  • 2.3.3.
  • Tam (tense-aspect-mode) systems
  • 2.3.4.
  • Simultaneous textual and interpersonal functions of discourse markers
  • 2.4.
  • 1.
  • Defining discourse markers
  • 3.
  • Ojibwe discourse markers
  • 3.1.
  • Discourse connectives
  • 3.1.1.
  • Initial position
  • 3.1.1.1.
  • inashke
  • 3.1.1.2.
  • Introduction and background
  • miinawaa
  • 3.1.1.3.
  • onzaam
  • 3.1.1.4.
  • dibishkoo
  • 3.1.1.5.
  • Mii dash
  • 3.1.2.
  • Second position
  • 3.1.2.1.
  • 1.1.
  • Idash as a contrastive marker
  • 3.1.2.1.1.
  • Digressions
  • 3.1.2.1.2.
  • Backgrounding and foregrounding
  • 3.1.2.1.3.
  • Idash in adjacency pairs
  • 3.1.3.
  • Preverbs
  • 3.1.3.1.
  • language
  • Relative preverb izhi
  • 3.2.
  • Mystery particles
  • 3.2.1.
  • Initial position
  • 3.2.1.1.
  • Mii as a veridical marker
  • 3.2.1.2.
  • Mii as a command softener
  • 3.2.1.3.
  • 1.2.
  • awenh, inenh
  • 3.2.1.4.
  • aaniish
  • 3.2.2.
  • Second-position mystery particles
  • 3.2.2.1.
  • isa
  • 3.2.2.1.1.
  • Isa as a marker of closings
  • 3.2.2.1.2.
  • Why study Ojibwe discourse markers?
  • Isa as a marker of relinquishment
  • 3.2.2.1.3.
  • Isa as a marker of conclusory gists
  • 3.2.2.1.4.
  • Isa as a marker of resultant action
  • 3.2.2.1.5.
  • Isa as a position strengthener
  • 3.2.2.1.6.
  • Isa as a placeholder
  • 3.2.2.1.7.
  • 1.3.
  • Sa go
  • 3.2.2.2.
  • gosha
  • 3.2.2.3.
  • sha
  • 3.2.2.4.
  • da
  • 3.2.2.5.
  • bina
  • 3.2.2.6.
Control code
ocn948296915
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780803299382
Lccn
2015040325
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctt1d8gsk9
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)948296915
Label
Ojibwe discourse markers, Brendan Fairbanks
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Methodology
  • goda
  • 3.2.2.7.
  • naa
  • 3.2.2.7.1.
  • Second-position discourse clusters with naa
  • 4.
  • Conjunct order as a discourse-marking device
  • 4.1.
  • Sentence-level use of conjuncts
  • 4.1.1.
  • 1.4.
  • Dependent clauses
  • 4.1.2.
  • Temporal immediacy and the connective feature of the conjunct
  • 4.1.3.
  • Situational immediacy
  • 4.2.
  • Discourse use of conjuncts
  • 5.
  • Conclusion
  • Orthography
  • 2.
  • What is a discourse marker?
  • 2.1.
  • Schiffrin's definition of discourse markers
  • 2.2.
  • Relevance theorists' view of discourse markers
  • 2.3.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Cross-linguistic data
  • 2.3.1.
  • Position
  • 2.3.2.
  • Clitics and affixes
  • 2.3.3.
  • Tam (tense-aspect-mode) systems
  • 2.3.4.
  • Simultaneous textual and interpersonal functions of discourse markers
  • 2.4.
  • 1.
  • Defining discourse markers
  • 3.
  • Ojibwe discourse markers
  • 3.1.
  • Discourse connectives
  • 3.1.1.
  • Initial position
  • 3.1.1.1.
  • inashke
  • 3.1.1.2.
  • Introduction and background
  • miinawaa
  • 3.1.1.3.
  • onzaam
  • 3.1.1.4.
  • dibishkoo
  • 3.1.1.5.
  • Mii dash
  • 3.1.2.
  • Second position
  • 3.1.2.1.
  • 1.1.
  • Idash as a contrastive marker
  • 3.1.2.1.1.
  • Digressions
  • 3.1.2.1.2.
  • Backgrounding and foregrounding
  • 3.1.2.1.3.
  • Idash in adjacency pairs
  • 3.1.3.
  • Preverbs
  • 3.1.3.1.
  • language
  • Relative preverb izhi
  • 3.2.
  • Mystery particles
  • 3.2.1.
  • Initial position
  • 3.2.1.1.
  • Mii as a veridical marker
  • 3.2.1.2.
  • Mii as a command softener
  • 3.2.1.3.
  • 1.2.
  • awenh, inenh
  • 3.2.1.4.
  • aaniish
  • 3.2.2.
  • Second-position mystery particles
  • 3.2.2.1.
  • isa
  • 3.2.2.1.1.
  • Isa as a marker of closings
  • 3.2.2.1.2.
  • Why study Ojibwe discourse markers?
  • Isa as a marker of relinquishment
  • 3.2.2.1.3.
  • Isa as a marker of conclusory gists
  • 3.2.2.1.4.
  • Isa as a marker of resultant action
  • 3.2.2.1.5.
  • Isa as a position strengthener
  • 3.2.2.1.6.
  • Isa as a placeholder
  • 3.2.2.1.7.
  • 1.3.
  • Sa go
  • 3.2.2.2.
  • gosha
  • 3.2.2.3.
  • sha
  • 3.2.2.4.
  • da
  • 3.2.2.5.
  • bina
  • 3.2.2.6.
Control code
ocn948296915
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780803299382
Lccn
2015040325
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctt1d8gsk9
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)948296915

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      32.771354 -117.193327
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