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The Resource One-sided arguments : a dialectical analysis of bias, Douglas Walton

One-sided arguments : a dialectical analysis of bias, Douglas Walton

Label
One-sided arguments : a dialectical analysis of bias
Title
One-sided arguments
Title remainder
a dialectical analysis of bias
Statement of responsibility
Douglas Walton
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • We often feel that an argument should be doubted or held as suspicious because it has a bias. But bias isn't always wrong. It is a normal phenomenon in advocacy argumentation, and in many cases it is to be expected. Yet sometimes bias can be quite harmful in argumentation. In this book, bias is defined as one-sided advocacy of a point of view in argumentation. It is shown to be harmful, or properly subject to critical condemnation, only when the dialogue exchange is supposed to be a balanced, two-sided exchange of viewpoints
  • The book concedes the postmodernist premise that bias is quite normal in everyday conversational arguments, and that a finding of bias should not, by itself, constitute grounds for criticizing an argument as critically deficient or fallacious. But the book strongly disagrees with the postmodernist conclusion that no standard of rationality can be brought to bear to condemn narrowly interest-based or one-sided arguments as biased. It is argued that in some cases narrow, one-sided partisanship in an argument is justifiably a basis for negative criticism of the worth of the argument
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Walton, Douglas N
Index
index present
LC call number
BC177
LC item number
.W3255 1999
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
SUNY series in logic and language
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Reasoning
  • Prejudices
Label
One-sided arguments : a dialectical analysis of bias, Douglas Walton
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 279-286) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • p. 4.
  • Aspects of the New Theory
  • p. 84.
  • Chapter 4.
  • Indicators of Bias in Argumentation
  • p. 91.
  • 1.
  • Something to Gain
  • p. 92.
  • 2.
  • Selection of Arguments
  • 3.
  • p. 95.
  • 3.
  • Lip-Service Selection
  • p. 98.
  • 4.
  • Commitment to an Identifiable Position
  • p. 98.
  • 5.
  • Closure to Opposed Argumentation
  • p. 100.
  • Bacon on Idols of the Mind
  • 6.
  • Rigidity of Stereotyping
  • p. 103.
  • 7.
  • Treating Comparable Cases Differently
  • p. 106.
  • 8.
  • Emphasis and Hyperbole
  • p. 108.
  • 9.
  • p. 7.
  • Implicature and Innuendo
  • p. 110.
  • 10.
  • Using the Indicators
  • p. 112.
  • Chapter 5.
  • Biased Language
  • p. 115.
  • 1.
  • Language Used in the Abortion Issue
  • 4.
  • p. 116.
  • 2.
  • Influencing the Media through Language
  • p. 120.
  • 3.
  • Defining 'Poverty'
  • p. 122.
  • 4.
  • Defining 'Pornography'
  • p. 124.
  • Arnauld on Sophisms of Self-Love, Interest, and Passion
  • 5.
  • Biased Terminology in Scientific Research
  • p. 127.
  • 6.
  • Origins of Concern about Slanted Terms
  • p. 128.
  • 7.
  • The
  • Fallacy of Loaded Term
  • p. 130.
  • p. 9.
  • 8.
  • Question-Begging Appellatives
  • p. 132.
  • 9.
  • Question-Begging Epithets
  • p. 135.
  • 10.
  • Question-Begging Definitions
  • p. 139.
  • 11.
  • 5.
  • Persuasive Definitions
  • p. 140.
  • 12.
  • Stevenson's and Robinson's Analyses
  • p. 144.
  • 13.
  • Context of Use of Arguments
  • p. 147.
  • 14.
  • Uses of Slanted Terms
  • Watts on Prejudices of the Mind
  • p. 148.
  • 15.
  • Handling Persuasive Definitions
  • p. 150.
  • Chapter 6.
  • Arguments in Sales and Advertising
  • p. 157.
  • 1.
  • The
  • Standard Treatment
  • p. 11.
  • p. 158.
  • 2.
  • Appeal to Pity
  • p. 161.
  • 3.
  • Appeal to Popularity
  • p. 163.
  • 4.
  • Suppressed Evidence
  • p. 166.
  • Chapter 1.
  • 6.
  • 5.
  • Sales Dialogue
  • p. 168.
  • 6.
  • Forms of Advocacy
  • p. 172.
  • 7.
  • The
  • Mosaic Theory
  • p. 174.
  • Bentham on Prejudices and Interests
  • 8.
  • Infomercials
  • p. 177.
  • 9.
  • Can a Good Argument Be Biased?
  • p. 180.
  • Chapter 7.
  • Testing Allegations of Bias
  • p. 185.
  • 1.
  • p. 15.
  • Evidence for a Charge of Bias
  • p. 185.
  • 2.
  • Potential for a Charge of Bias
  • p. 188.
  • 3.
  • Suspicions of Unconscious Bias
  • p. 190.
  • 4.
  • The
  • 7.
  • Last Battleground Case
  • p. 192.
  • 5.
  • Defending against a Criticism of Bias
  • p. 197.
  • 6.
  • Burden of Proof in This Case
  • p. 199.
  • 7.
  • Harmful Bias and Duplicity
  • Kant on Prejudices and Provisional Judgments
  • p. 201.
  • 8.
  • Evaluation of the Case
  • p. 203.
  • 9.
  • Raising Critical Questions
  • p. 204.
  • 10.
  • How Bias Should Be Evaluated
  • p. 205.
  • p. 17.
  • Chapter 8.
  • Bias in Legal and Scientific Arguments
  • p. 209.
  • 1.
  • Bias in Legal and Scientific Arguments
  • p. 210.
  • 2.
  • Bias as Attributed to Witnesses
  • p. 212.
  • 3.
  • 8.
  • Bias as Attributed to Judges and Juries
  • p. 216.
  • 4.
  • Balance in a Fair Trial
  • p. 218.
  • 5.
  • Bias in Scientific Research
  • p. 220.
  • 6.
  • Biased Statistics
  • Beardsley on Suggestion and Slanting
  • p. 224.
  • 7.
  • Use of Statistics by Advocacy Groups
  • p. 227.
  • 8.
  • Bias in Polling
  • p. 228.
  • 9.
  • Biased Questions
  • p. 230.
  • p. 19.
  • 10.
  • Postmodernist Law and Science
  • p. 233.
  • Chapter 9.
  • The
  • Witch Hunt as a Structure of Argumentation
  • p. 237.
  • 1.
  • The
  • Inquisition
  • 9.
  • p. 239.
  • 2.
  • Witchcraft Trials
  • p. 240.
  • 3.
  • Initial Conditions
  • p. 243.
  • 4.
  • Parasemotic Structure
  • p. 247.
  • Historical Background
  • Psychologism in Logic
  • 5.
  • Evidence
  • p. 249.
  • 6.
  • Nonopenness
  • p. 251.
  • 7.
  • Reversal of Polarity
  • p. 252.
  • 8.
  • p. 21.
  • Use of Loaded Questions
  • p. 254.
  • 9.
  • The
  • Sequence of Argumentation in the Witch Hunt
  • p. 255.
  • 10.
  • Judging Cases
  • p. 257.
  • Chapter 10.
  • 10.
  • Extending the Theory
  • p. 259.
  • 1.
  • Summary of the Dialectical Theory
  • p. 259.
  • 2.
  • The
  • State of Formal Dialectic
  • p. 261.
  • 3.
  • Normative Reconstruction of Argumentation
  • Multi-Agent Systems
  • p. 262.
  • 4.
  • The
  • Stronger and Weaker Notions of an Agent
  • p. 265.
  • 5.
  • Characteristics of a Credible Arguer
  • p. 266.
  • 6.
  • p. 23.
  • The
  • Credibility Function
  • p. 268.
  • 7.
  • Agent and Argument Bias
  • p. 270.
  • 8.
  • Why Should Bias Matter?
  • p. 271.
  • 9.
  • Chapter 2.
  • Three Ways of Evaluating an Argument
  • p. 273.
  • 10.
  • Postmodernism and Bias
  • p. 274
  • Dialectical Preliminaries
  • p. 27.
  • 1.
  • Reasoning and Argument
  • p. 1.
  • p. 27.
  • 2.
  • Persuasion Dialogue
  • p. 29.
  • 3.
  • Commitment and Maieutic Insight
  • p. 33.
  • 4.
  • Negotiation Dialogue
  • p. 36.
  • 1.
  • 5.
  • Inquiry
  • p. 38.
  • 6.
  • Deliberation
  • p. 41.
  • 7.
  • Information-Seeking Dialogue
  • p. 44.
  • 8.
  • Plato and Aristotle on Dialectic
  • Eristic Dialogue
  • p. 46.
  • 9.
  • Mixed Dialogues
  • p. 50.
  • 10.
  • Dialectical Shifts
  • p. 54.
  • Chapter 3.
  • The
  • p. 1.
  • Theory of Bias
  • p. 59.
  • 1.
  • Initial Perceptions of Bias
  • p. 60.
  • 2.
  • Objectivity, Neutrality, and Impartiality
  • p. 62.
  • 3.
  • Point of View and Commitment
  • 2.
  • p. 65.
  • 4.
  • Position Revealed by Argumentation
  • p. 68.
  • 5.
  • Fairmindedness in Critical Thinking
  • p. 70.
  • 6.
  • Critical Doubt
  • p. 74.
  • Twentieth-Century Logic Textbooks on Bias
  • 7.
  • Bias as One-Sided Argument
  • p. 76.
  • 8.
  • How Is Bias Detected in an Argument?
  • p. 79.
  • 9.
  • When Is Bias Harmful?
  • p. 81.
  • 10.
Control code
41090613
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xix, 295 pages
Isbn
9780791442678
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
99015100
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Label
One-sided arguments : a dialectical analysis of bias, Douglas Walton
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 279-286) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • p. 4.
  • Aspects of the New Theory
  • p. 84.
  • Chapter 4.
  • Indicators of Bias in Argumentation
  • p. 91.
  • 1.
  • Something to Gain
  • p. 92.
  • 2.
  • Selection of Arguments
  • 3.
  • p. 95.
  • 3.
  • Lip-Service Selection
  • p. 98.
  • 4.
  • Commitment to an Identifiable Position
  • p. 98.
  • 5.
  • Closure to Opposed Argumentation
  • p. 100.
  • Bacon on Idols of the Mind
  • 6.
  • Rigidity of Stereotyping
  • p. 103.
  • 7.
  • Treating Comparable Cases Differently
  • p. 106.
  • 8.
  • Emphasis and Hyperbole
  • p. 108.
  • 9.
  • p. 7.
  • Implicature and Innuendo
  • p. 110.
  • 10.
  • Using the Indicators
  • p. 112.
  • Chapter 5.
  • Biased Language
  • p. 115.
  • 1.
  • Language Used in the Abortion Issue
  • 4.
  • p. 116.
  • 2.
  • Influencing the Media through Language
  • p. 120.
  • 3.
  • Defining 'Poverty'
  • p. 122.
  • 4.
  • Defining 'Pornography'
  • p. 124.
  • Arnauld on Sophisms of Self-Love, Interest, and Passion
  • 5.
  • Biased Terminology in Scientific Research
  • p. 127.
  • 6.
  • Origins of Concern about Slanted Terms
  • p. 128.
  • 7.
  • The
  • Fallacy of Loaded Term
  • p. 130.
  • p. 9.
  • 8.
  • Question-Begging Appellatives
  • p. 132.
  • 9.
  • Question-Begging Epithets
  • p. 135.
  • 10.
  • Question-Begging Definitions
  • p. 139.
  • 11.
  • 5.
  • Persuasive Definitions
  • p. 140.
  • 12.
  • Stevenson's and Robinson's Analyses
  • p. 144.
  • 13.
  • Context of Use of Arguments
  • p. 147.
  • 14.
  • Uses of Slanted Terms
  • Watts on Prejudices of the Mind
  • p. 148.
  • 15.
  • Handling Persuasive Definitions
  • p. 150.
  • Chapter 6.
  • Arguments in Sales and Advertising
  • p. 157.
  • 1.
  • The
  • Standard Treatment
  • p. 11.
  • p. 158.
  • 2.
  • Appeal to Pity
  • p. 161.
  • 3.
  • Appeal to Popularity
  • p. 163.
  • 4.
  • Suppressed Evidence
  • p. 166.
  • Chapter 1.
  • 6.
  • 5.
  • Sales Dialogue
  • p. 168.
  • 6.
  • Forms of Advocacy
  • p. 172.
  • 7.
  • The
  • Mosaic Theory
  • p. 174.
  • Bentham on Prejudices and Interests
  • 8.
  • Infomercials
  • p. 177.
  • 9.
  • Can a Good Argument Be Biased?
  • p. 180.
  • Chapter 7.
  • Testing Allegations of Bias
  • p. 185.
  • 1.
  • p. 15.
  • Evidence for a Charge of Bias
  • p. 185.
  • 2.
  • Potential for a Charge of Bias
  • p. 188.
  • 3.
  • Suspicions of Unconscious Bias
  • p. 190.
  • 4.
  • The
  • 7.
  • Last Battleground Case
  • p. 192.
  • 5.
  • Defending against a Criticism of Bias
  • p. 197.
  • 6.
  • Burden of Proof in This Case
  • p. 199.
  • 7.
  • Harmful Bias and Duplicity
  • Kant on Prejudices and Provisional Judgments
  • p. 201.
  • 8.
  • Evaluation of the Case
  • p. 203.
  • 9.
  • Raising Critical Questions
  • p. 204.
  • 10.
  • How Bias Should Be Evaluated
  • p. 205.
  • p. 17.
  • Chapter 8.
  • Bias in Legal and Scientific Arguments
  • p. 209.
  • 1.
  • Bias in Legal and Scientific Arguments
  • p. 210.
  • 2.
  • Bias as Attributed to Witnesses
  • p. 212.
  • 3.
  • 8.
  • Bias as Attributed to Judges and Juries
  • p. 216.
  • 4.
  • Balance in a Fair Trial
  • p. 218.
  • 5.
  • Bias in Scientific Research
  • p. 220.
  • 6.
  • Biased Statistics
  • Beardsley on Suggestion and Slanting
  • p. 224.
  • 7.
  • Use of Statistics by Advocacy Groups
  • p. 227.
  • 8.
  • Bias in Polling
  • p. 228.
  • 9.
  • Biased Questions
  • p. 230.
  • p. 19.
  • 10.
  • Postmodernist Law and Science
  • p. 233.
  • Chapter 9.
  • The
  • Witch Hunt as a Structure of Argumentation
  • p. 237.
  • 1.
  • The
  • Inquisition
  • 9.
  • p. 239.
  • 2.
  • Witchcraft Trials
  • p. 240.
  • 3.
  • Initial Conditions
  • p. 243.
  • 4.
  • Parasemotic Structure
  • p. 247.
  • Historical Background
  • Psychologism in Logic
  • 5.
  • Evidence
  • p. 249.
  • 6.
  • Nonopenness
  • p. 251.
  • 7.
  • Reversal of Polarity
  • p. 252.
  • 8.
  • p. 21.
  • Use of Loaded Questions
  • p. 254.
  • 9.
  • The
  • Sequence of Argumentation in the Witch Hunt
  • p. 255.
  • 10.
  • Judging Cases
  • p. 257.
  • Chapter 10.
  • 10.
  • Extending the Theory
  • p. 259.
  • 1.
  • Summary of the Dialectical Theory
  • p. 259.
  • 2.
  • The
  • State of Formal Dialectic
  • p. 261.
  • 3.
  • Normative Reconstruction of Argumentation
  • Multi-Agent Systems
  • p. 262.
  • 4.
  • The
  • Stronger and Weaker Notions of an Agent
  • p. 265.
  • 5.
  • Characteristics of a Credible Arguer
  • p. 266.
  • 6.
  • p. 23.
  • The
  • Credibility Function
  • p. 268.
  • 7.
  • Agent and Argument Bias
  • p. 270.
  • 8.
  • Why Should Bias Matter?
  • p. 271.
  • 9.
  • Chapter 2.
  • Three Ways of Evaluating an Argument
  • p. 273.
  • 10.
  • Postmodernism and Bias
  • p. 274
  • Dialectical Preliminaries
  • p. 27.
  • 1.
  • Reasoning and Argument
  • p. 1.
  • p. 27.
  • 2.
  • Persuasion Dialogue
  • p. 29.
  • 3.
  • Commitment and Maieutic Insight
  • p. 33.
  • 4.
  • Negotiation Dialogue
  • p. 36.
  • 1.
  • 5.
  • Inquiry
  • p. 38.
  • 6.
  • Deliberation
  • p. 41.
  • 7.
  • Information-Seeking Dialogue
  • p. 44.
  • 8.
  • Plato and Aristotle on Dialectic
  • Eristic Dialogue
  • p. 46.
  • 9.
  • Mixed Dialogues
  • p. 50.
  • 10.
  • Dialectical Shifts
  • p. 54.
  • Chapter 3.
  • The
  • p. 1.
  • Theory of Bias
  • p. 59.
  • 1.
  • Initial Perceptions of Bias
  • p. 60.
  • 2.
  • Objectivity, Neutrality, and Impartiality
  • p. 62.
  • 3.
  • Point of View and Commitment
  • 2.
  • p. 65.
  • 4.
  • Position Revealed by Argumentation
  • p. 68.
  • 5.
  • Fairmindedness in Critical Thinking
  • p. 70.
  • 6.
  • Critical Doubt
  • p. 74.
  • Twentieth-Century Logic Textbooks on Bias
  • 7.
  • Bias as One-Sided Argument
  • p. 76.
  • 8.
  • How Is Bias Detected in an Argument?
  • p. 79.
  • 9.
  • When Is Bias Harmful?
  • p. 81.
  • 10.
Control code
41090613
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xix, 295 pages
Isbn
9780791442678
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
99015100
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n

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