Coverart for item
The Resource Scottish newspapers, language and identity, Fiona M. Douglas

Scottish newspapers, language and identity, Fiona M. Douglas

Label
Scottish newspapers, language and identity
Title
Scottish newspapers, language and identity
Statement of responsibility
Fiona M. Douglas
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Shoutline Offers new insights into the use of the Scottish language by the Scottish pressThe first decade of the new Scottish Parliament has seen the emergence of a new-found national confidence. 'Scottishness' is clearly alive and flourishing. This book offers new and detailed insights into Scottish language and its usage by the Scottish press. To what extent does the use of identifiably Scottish lexical features help them to maintain their distinctive Scottish identity and appeal to their readership? Which Scottish words and phrases do the papers use and where, is it a symbolic gesture, do they all behave in the same way, and has this changed since devolution?
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Douglas, Fiona
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Scottish newspapers
  • Scots language
  • National characteristics, Scottish
  • LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES
  • HISTORY
  • National characteristics, Scottish
  • Scots language
  • Scottish newspapers
Label
Scottish newspapers, language and identity, Fiona M. Douglas
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 171-182) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Cover -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- List of Tables -- Acknowledgements -- 1 -- Introduction -- 1.1 Setting the Scene -- 1.1.1 Scotland today -- 1.1.2 Changes in the political landscape -- 1.2 Scotland's Linguistic Communities -- 1.3 Introducing the Subject Matter -- 1.3.1 Definition of key terms -- 1.4 The Newspaper Corpus: Hard Evidence -- 1.4.1 Methodological considerations -- 1.5 Overview of Chapter Content -- Further Reading -- 2 -- What is Scottish Identity? -- 2.1 What Constitutes Identity? -- 2.2 Is Identity Fixed? -- 2.3 Language and Identity -- 2.3.1 Language display -- 2.4 A Distinctive Scottish Identity -- 2.4.1 Defining Scottishness -- 2.4.2 The imagined Scottish community -- 2.4.3 The role of Scottish language -- 2.4.4 Language, identity and nation states -- 2.4.5 The role of Scottish stereotypes -- 2.5 Conclusion -- Further Read -- 3 -- What is Scottish Language? -- 3.1 The Historical Context -- 3.2 The Linguistic Continuum -- 3.2.1 Varieties along the continuum -- 3.2.2 Polarisation, code-switching and style-drifting -- 3.3 Written vs Spoken Varieties -- 3.4 Thin and Dense Scots -- 3.5 Open vs Closed Class Scots Lexis -- 3.6 Cognate vs Non-Cognate Lexis -- 3.7 Linguistic Status -- 3.8 Linguistic Attitudes: Ambivalence and Insecurity -- 3.9 Linguistic Awareness -- 3.10 Implications for Scottish Newspaper Texts -- Further Reading -- 4 -- Newspapers and their Readers -- 4.1 Readerships -- 4.2 Importance of a Shared Community Consciousness -- 4.3 The Ideal Reader -- 4.4 Alignment with Readership -- 4.4.1 Scottish branding -- 4.4.2 A visible presence -- 4.4.3 Rootedness of journalists -- 4.4.4 Including Scottish content and viewpoint -- 4.4.5 Alignment via language -- 4.5 The Press as Gatekeepers -- 4.6 The Appropriacy Pact -- 4.7 Gatekeeping, Appropriacy and Use of Scots Language -- 4.8 Conclusion -- Further Reading -- 5 -- A Limited Identity -- 5.1 The Overview -- 5.2 Where Do We Find Scots Lexis? -- 5.2.1 Methodology -- 5.2.2 Most Scots article types and journalists -- 5.3 Why is Usage of Scots Lexis Restricted to these Areas? -- 5.4 A Humorous Language? -- 5.5 How Scottish is too Scottish? -- 5.5.1 Thin and dense Scots -- 5.5.2 Open vs closed class lexis -- 5.6 How Different does it have to be from English? -- 5.6.1 Cognate/non-cognate lexis and density -- 5.6.2 Non-cognate/cognate and open vs closed class lexis -- 5.7 A Language More Fitted for Speech? -- 5.7.1 Methods for research into direct speech contexts -- 5.7.2 The individual rather than the institutional voice -- 5.8 Newspapers as a Force for Standardisation? -- 5.9 The Industry Perspective -- Further Reading -- 6 -- A Multifaceted and Formulaic Identity -- 6.1 A Mediated Scottish Identity -- 6.1.1 Scottish identity mediated by class identity -- 6.1.2 Scottish identity mediated by local identity -- 6.2 Importance of Stereotypes and the Formulaic -- 6.3 Quotations and Allusions -- 6.4 Proverbs, Popular Wisdom and Sayings -- 6.5 Idiomatic Expressions -- 6.6 Other Fixed Expressions -- 6.6.1 Language variety of contexts for idioms and fixed expressions -- 6.7 Variation and Productivity -- 6.8 Common Collocational Clusters -- 6.9 Sources of the Formulaic -- 6.9.1 Importance of kinship, ancestral
Control code
ocn367650346
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 188 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780748671533
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
Other physical details
illustrations
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/cttk0h91
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)367650346
Label
Scottish newspapers, language and identity, Fiona M. Douglas
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 171-182) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Cover -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- List of Tables -- Acknowledgements -- 1 -- Introduction -- 1.1 Setting the Scene -- 1.1.1 Scotland today -- 1.1.2 Changes in the political landscape -- 1.2 Scotland's Linguistic Communities -- 1.3 Introducing the Subject Matter -- 1.3.1 Definition of key terms -- 1.4 The Newspaper Corpus: Hard Evidence -- 1.4.1 Methodological considerations -- 1.5 Overview of Chapter Content -- Further Reading -- 2 -- What is Scottish Identity? -- 2.1 What Constitutes Identity? -- 2.2 Is Identity Fixed? -- 2.3 Language and Identity -- 2.3.1 Language display -- 2.4 A Distinctive Scottish Identity -- 2.4.1 Defining Scottishness -- 2.4.2 The imagined Scottish community -- 2.4.3 The role of Scottish language -- 2.4.4 Language, identity and nation states -- 2.4.5 The role of Scottish stereotypes -- 2.5 Conclusion -- Further Read -- 3 -- What is Scottish Language? -- 3.1 The Historical Context -- 3.2 The Linguistic Continuum -- 3.2.1 Varieties along the continuum -- 3.2.2 Polarisation, code-switching and style-drifting -- 3.3 Written vs Spoken Varieties -- 3.4 Thin and Dense Scots -- 3.5 Open vs Closed Class Scots Lexis -- 3.6 Cognate vs Non-Cognate Lexis -- 3.7 Linguistic Status -- 3.8 Linguistic Attitudes: Ambivalence and Insecurity -- 3.9 Linguistic Awareness -- 3.10 Implications for Scottish Newspaper Texts -- Further Reading -- 4 -- Newspapers and their Readers -- 4.1 Readerships -- 4.2 Importance of a Shared Community Consciousness -- 4.3 The Ideal Reader -- 4.4 Alignment with Readership -- 4.4.1 Scottish branding -- 4.4.2 A visible presence -- 4.4.3 Rootedness of journalists -- 4.4.4 Including Scottish content and viewpoint -- 4.4.5 Alignment via language -- 4.5 The Press as Gatekeepers -- 4.6 The Appropriacy Pact -- 4.7 Gatekeeping, Appropriacy and Use of Scots Language -- 4.8 Conclusion -- Further Reading -- 5 -- A Limited Identity -- 5.1 The Overview -- 5.2 Where Do We Find Scots Lexis? -- 5.2.1 Methodology -- 5.2.2 Most Scots article types and journalists -- 5.3 Why is Usage of Scots Lexis Restricted to these Areas? -- 5.4 A Humorous Language? -- 5.5 How Scottish is too Scottish? -- 5.5.1 Thin and dense Scots -- 5.5.2 Open vs closed class lexis -- 5.6 How Different does it have to be from English? -- 5.6.1 Cognate/non-cognate lexis and density -- 5.6.2 Non-cognate/cognate and open vs closed class lexis -- 5.7 A Language More Fitted for Speech? -- 5.7.1 Methods for research into direct speech contexts -- 5.7.2 The individual rather than the institutional voice -- 5.8 Newspapers as a Force for Standardisation? -- 5.9 The Industry Perspective -- Further Reading -- 6 -- A Multifaceted and Formulaic Identity -- 6.1 A Mediated Scottish Identity -- 6.1.1 Scottish identity mediated by class identity -- 6.1.2 Scottish identity mediated by local identity -- 6.2 Importance of Stereotypes and the Formulaic -- 6.3 Quotations and Allusions -- 6.4 Proverbs, Popular Wisdom and Sayings -- 6.5 Idiomatic Expressions -- 6.6 Other Fixed Expressions -- 6.6.1 Language variety of contexts for idioms and fixed expressions -- 6.7 Variation and Productivity -- 6.8 Common Collocational Clusters -- 6.9 Sources of the Formulaic -- 6.9.1 Importance of kinship, ancestral
Control code
ocn367650346
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 188 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780748671533
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
Other physical details
illustrations
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/cttk0h91
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)367650346

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