Coverart for item
The Resource Seven rules for social research, Glenn Firebaugh

Seven rules for social research, Glenn Firebaugh

Label
Seven rules for social research
Title
Seven rules for social research
Statement of responsibility
Glenn Firebaugh
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
'Seven Rules for Social Research' teaches social scientists how to get the most out of their technical skills and tools, providing a resource that fully describes the strategies and concepts no researcher or student of human behaviour can do without
Action
digitized
Cataloging source
OCLCE
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Firebaugh, Glenn
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Social sciences
  • Psychology
  • Education
  • Public health
  • Qualitative research
  • Quantitative research
  • Education
  • Psychology
  • Public health
  • Qualitative research
  • Quantitative research
  • Social sciences
  • Sociaal-wetenschappelijk onderzoek
  • Hermeneutik
  • Sozialwissenschaften
  • Methode
  • SOCIAL SCIENCE / Essays
  • SOCIAL SCIENCE / Reference
Label
Seven rules for social research, Glenn Firebaugh
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
file reproduced from original
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 241-252) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
black and white
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Chapter 1: The first rule. There should be the possibility of surprise in social research. Selecting a research question -- Researchable questions -- Interesting questions -- Selecting a sample -- Samples in qualitative studies -- Is meaningful social research possible? -- Summary -- Student exercises on Rule 1. Chapter 2: The second rule. Look for differences that make a difference, and report them. You can't explain a variable with a constant -- Maximizing variance to find the effect of a cause -- Size versus statistical significance -- Comparing effects where there is a common metric -- Calibration: converting explanatory variables to a common metric -- Substantive profiling: the use of telling comparisons -- Visual presentation of results -- Policy importance -- Importance for theory -- Conclusion -- Student exercises on Rule 2. Chapter 3: The third rule. Build reality checks into your research. Internal reality checks -- Reality checks on data-dubious values and incomplete data -- Reality checks on measures-aim for consistency in conceptualization and measurement -- Reality checks on models-the form equivalence check -- External reality checks: validation with other data and methods -- Using casual-process observations to test plausibility of results -- Using ethnographic data to help interpret survey results -- Other examples of multiple-method research -- Concluding remark -- Student exercises on Rule 3. Chapter 4: The fourth rule. Replicate where possible. Sources of uncertainty in social research -- Overview: from population to sample and back to population -- Measurement error as a source of uncertainty -- Illustration two methods for estimating global poverty -- Toward a solution: identical analyses of parallel data sets -- Meta-analysis: synthesizing results formally across studies -- Summary: Your confidence intervals are too narrow -- Student exercises on Rule 4. Chapter 5: The fifth rule. Compare like with like. Correlation and causality
  • Types of strategies for comparing like with like -- Matching versus looking for differences. The standard regression method for comparing like with like -- Critique of the standard linear regression strategy -- Comparing like with like through fixed-effects methods -- First-difference models: subtracting out the effects of confounding variables -- Special case: growth-rate models -- Sibling models -- Comparing like with like through matching on measured variables -- Exact matching -- Propensity-score method -- Matching as a preprocessing strategy for reducing model dependence -- Comparing like with like through naturally occurring random assignment -- Instrumental variables: matching through partial random assignment -- Matching through naturally occurring random assignment to the treatment group -- Comparison of strategies for comparing like with like -- Conclusion -- Student exercises on Rule 5. Chapter 6: The sixth rule. Use panel data to study individual change and repeated cross-section data to study social change. Analytic differences between panel and repeated cross-section data -- Three general questions about change -- Changing-effect models, Part 1: two points in time -- Changing effects models, Part 2: multilevel models with time as the context -- What we want to know -- The general multilevel model -- Convergence models -- The sign test for convergence -- Convergence model versus changing-effect model -- Bridging individual and social change: estimating cohort replacement effects -- An accounting scheme for social change -- Linear decomposition method -- Summary -- Student exercises on Rule 6. Chapter 7: The seventh rule. Let method be the servant, not the master. Obsession with regression -- Naturally occurring ramdom assignment, again -- Decomposition work in the social sciences -- Decomposition of variance and inequality -- Decomposition of segregation indexes -- The effects of social context -- Context effects as objects of study -- Context
  • effects as nuisance -- Critical tests in social research -- Conclusion -- Student exercises on Rule 7
Control code
ocn608836785
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xiii, 257 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780691190433
Level of compression
  • lossless
  • lossy
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
Other physical details
illustrations
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctv397jgh
Reformatting quality
  • preservation
  • access
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)608836785
System details
Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002.
Label
Seven rules for social research, Glenn Firebaugh
Publication
Antecedent source
file reproduced from original
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 241-252) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
black and white
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Chapter 1: The first rule. There should be the possibility of surprise in social research. Selecting a research question -- Researchable questions -- Interesting questions -- Selecting a sample -- Samples in qualitative studies -- Is meaningful social research possible? -- Summary -- Student exercises on Rule 1. Chapter 2: The second rule. Look for differences that make a difference, and report them. You can't explain a variable with a constant -- Maximizing variance to find the effect of a cause -- Size versus statistical significance -- Comparing effects where there is a common metric -- Calibration: converting explanatory variables to a common metric -- Substantive profiling: the use of telling comparisons -- Visual presentation of results -- Policy importance -- Importance for theory -- Conclusion -- Student exercises on Rule 2. Chapter 3: The third rule. Build reality checks into your research. Internal reality checks -- Reality checks on data-dubious values and incomplete data -- Reality checks on measures-aim for consistency in conceptualization and measurement -- Reality checks on models-the form equivalence check -- External reality checks: validation with other data and methods -- Using casual-process observations to test plausibility of results -- Using ethnographic data to help interpret survey results -- Other examples of multiple-method research -- Concluding remark -- Student exercises on Rule 3. Chapter 4: The fourth rule. Replicate where possible. Sources of uncertainty in social research -- Overview: from population to sample and back to population -- Measurement error as a source of uncertainty -- Illustration two methods for estimating global poverty -- Toward a solution: identical analyses of parallel data sets -- Meta-analysis: synthesizing results formally across studies -- Summary: Your confidence intervals are too narrow -- Student exercises on Rule 4. Chapter 5: The fifth rule. Compare like with like. Correlation and causality
  • Types of strategies for comparing like with like -- Matching versus looking for differences. The standard regression method for comparing like with like -- Critique of the standard linear regression strategy -- Comparing like with like through fixed-effects methods -- First-difference models: subtracting out the effects of confounding variables -- Special case: growth-rate models -- Sibling models -- Comparing like with like through matching on measured variables -- Exact matching -- Propensity-score method -- Matching as a preprocessing strategy for reducing model dependence -- Comparing like with like through naturally occurring random assignment -- Instrumental variables: matching through partial random assignment -- Matching through naturally occurring random assignment to the treatment group -- Comparison of strategies for comparing like with like -- Conclusion -- Student exercises on Rule 5. Chapter 6: The sixth rule. Use panel data to study individual change and repeated cross-section data to study social change. Analytic differences between panel and repeated cross-section data -- Three general questions about change -- Changing-effect models, Part 1: two points in time -- Changing effects models, Part 2: multilevel models with time as the context -- What we want to know -- The general multilevel model -- Convergence models -- The sign test for convergence -- Convergence model versus changing-effect model -- Bridging individual and social change: estimating cohort replacement effects -- An accounting scheme for social change -- Linear decomposition method -- Summary -- Student exercises on Rule 6. Chapter 7: The seventh rule. Let method be the servant, not the master. Obsession with regression -- Naturally occurring ramdom assignment, again -- Decomposition work in the social sciences -- Decomposition of variance and inequality -- Decomposition of segregation indexes -- The effects of social context -- Context effects as objects of study -- Context
  • effects as nuisance -- Critical tests in social research -- Conclusion -- Student exercises on Rule 7
Control code
ocn608836785
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xiii, 257 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780691190433
Level of compression
  • lossless
  • lossy
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
Other physical details
illustrations
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctv397jgh
Reformatting quality
  • preservation
  • access
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)608836785
System details
Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002.

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