Coverart for item
The Resource Speaking for the dead : cadavers in biology and medicine, D. Gareth Jones

Speaking for the dead : cadavers in biology and medicine, D. Gareth Jones

Label
Speaking for the dead : cadavers in biology and medicine
Title
Speaking for the dead
Title remainder
cadavers in biology and medicine
Statement of responsibility
D. Gareth Jones
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • Speaking for the Dead is an incisive examination of the highly topical and often controversial issues surrounding the use of human cadavers in scientific research. These include the history and contemporary ethics of dissection, the teaching and research uses of the dead human body and the transplantation of animal tissue and organs into humans
  • As a Human Anatomist and Bioethicist, Gareth Jones offers a unique perspective on these issues, crossing the boundaries between clinical, medical, legal and ethical concerns. His exploration of historical developments as well as his analysis of recent case studies results in a pertinent and comprehensive examination of issues at the forefront of Bioethics
  • With its clear writing style and use of non-technical language Speaking for the Dead will be an essential book for all those interested in Bioethics, an area which continues to increase in significance with the development of new techniques for the manipulation of human cadavers
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1940-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Jones, D. Gareth
Index
index present
LC call number
RA619
LC item number
.J66 2000
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Dead
  • Dead
Label
Speaking for the dead : cadavers in biology and medicine, D. Gareth Jones
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 247-271) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • World of the Dead Body
  • p. 96.
  • Age of the Neomort: The Way of the Future?
  • p. 99.
  • Unethical Experiments on Humans-What Can They Teach Us?
  • p. 101.
  • The
  • Nazi Legacy-Background
  • p. 103.
  • The
  • Nazi Legacy-Contemporary Issues
  • p. 7.
  • p. 106.
  • Japanese Wartime Experiments
  • p. 109.
  • Unethical Experiments-When Moral Complicity Comes to the Fore
  • p. 110.
  • The
  • Legacy of Wartime Experimentation-Have We Learnt Anything?
  • p. 115.
  • 4.
  • Human Skeletal Remains: When Indigenous Concerns Conflict with Scientific Aspirations
  • The
  • p. 119.
  • Policy Developments
  • p. 121.
  • Contemporary Case Study
  • p. 123.
  • Scientific Interest and Indigenous Concerns
  • p. 127.
  • Assessing the Claims
  • p. 130.
  • Human Skeletal Material and Consent
  • Estranged World of Autopsies
  • p. 133.
  • Newly Discovered Remains
  • p. 135.
  • Human Remains of Prehistoric Origin
  • p. 136.
  • Past Mistreatment and Moral Complicity
  • p. 138.
  • Guidelines for Study of Human Skeletal Remains
  • p. 143.
  • The
  • p. 10.
  • Iroame
  • p. 145.
  • Skeletal Material as Teaching Tools
  • p. 147.
  • Past and Present Ethical Standards
  • p. 148.
  • 5.
  • Organ and Tissue Transplantation: Further Uses of Cadavers
  • p. 151.
  • Human Organ Transplantation
  • Disputed Corpses
  • p. 151.
  • Scientific and Clinical Developments
  • p. 151.
  • Donation of Cadaveric Organs
  • p. 153.
  • Consent in Cadaveric Organ Donation
  • p. 154.
  • Opt-In Policy (Informed Consent)
  • p. 155.
  • Opt-Out Policy (Presumed Consent)
  • p. 12.
  • p. 156.
  • Intermediate Positions
  • p. 160.
  • Cadavers as Life-Saving Devices
  • p. 163.
  • Organ Transplantation in Infants: The Use of Anencephalics
  • p. 164.
  • Neural Transplantation: The Use of Fetuses
  • p. 167.
  • Moral Complicity: An Exploration
  • Changing Perspectives with Time and Culture
  • p. 171.
  • Competing Ethical Frameworks
  • p. 177.
  • A
  • Network of Ethical Issues
  • p. 178.
  • Transplantation of Fetal Gametes for Assisted Fertilization
  • p. 181.
  • Stem Cells as Sources of Tissues and Organs
  • p. 183.
  • p. 15.
  • Xenotransplantation: Crossing Species Boundaries
  • p. 186.
  • Choosing an Animal Model
  • p. 187.
  • Xenozoonotic Infections
  • p. 188.
  • Ethical Objections
  • p. 190.
  • General Ethical Concerns
  • p. 192.
  • Locating Anatomy
  • Breaching Species Boundaries
  • p. 194.
  • 6.
  • Cadavers that May Not be Cadavers
  • p. 198.
  • Brain Death in Historical Context
  • p. 199.
  • Harvard Criteria
  • p. 199.
  • The
  • 1.
  • p. 16.
  • Developing Debate
  • p. 200.
  • Further Consequences
  • p. 201.
  • Definitions of Death and Brain Death
  • p. 203.
  • Equivalence of Death and Brain Death
  • p. 203.
  • Further Definitions of Brain Death
  • p. 205.
  • Defining Anatomy
  • Whole Brain Definition of Death
  • p. 207.
  • Objections to the Whole Brain Definition
  • p. 209.
  • Higher Brain Definition of Death
  • p. 212.
  • Objections to the Higher Brain Definition
  • p. 213.
  • Persistent Vegetative State
  • p. 215.
  • p. 17.
  • Questions and Queries
  • p. 215.
  • Description
  • p. 218.
  • Ethical Categories
  • p. 220.
  • Possibilities for Recovery
  • p. 222.
  • A
  • Continuum from Life to Death
  • Anatomy at Interfaces
  • p. 224.
  • 7.
  • Uses of Human Embryos and Fetuses
  • p. 226.
  • When are Human Embryos of Ethical Significance?-The Place of Biology
  • p. 226.
  • Pre-Embryo
  • p. 229.
  • Biological Characteristics of Early Development
  • p. 229.
  • p. 20.
  • Arguments Supporting the Pre-Embryo Concept
  • p. 230.
  • Extra-Embryonic Tissues and the Primitive Streak
  • p. 231.
  • Significance for Research on Human Tissues
  • p. 234.
  • From Brain Death to Brain Birth
  • p. 235.
  • The
  • Search for a Scientific Basis to Brain Birth
  • Implications for Anatomy as a Discipline
  • p. 236.
  • Assessment of the Brain Birth Concept
  • p. 238.
  • Is There More Than One Definition of Brain Birth?
  • p. 239.
  • From Brain Life to Brain Death
  • p. 240.
  • Embryos as Proto-Cadavers
  • p. 242
  • p. 22.
  • Anatomy and Art
  • p. 23.
  • Displaying Human Remains as Artistic Objects
  • Cadavers as Images of Ourselves
  • p. 23.
  • Plastination as an Art Form
  • p. 25.
  • The
  • Ethos and Ethics of Anatomical Science
  • p. 26.
  • 2.
  • History and Contemporary Ethos of Dissection
  • p. 32.
  • Anatomy, History and Society
  • p. 1.
  • p. 32.
  • Greek and Roman Influences
  • p. 32.
  • Medieval Developments
  • p. 35.
  • The
  • Ethical Significance of the Dead Body
  • p. 40.
  • Obtaining Bodies for Dissection
  • p. 44.
  • Anatomy and the Culture of Dissection
  • Historical Developments in Britain
  • p. 44.
  • Historical Developments in the United States
  • p. 47.
  • Experience and Legislation in Other Countries
  • p. 51.
  • Why People Bequeath their Bodies for Dissection
  • p. 54.
  • Is it Ethical to Use Unclaimed Bodies?
  • p. 57.
  • p. 2.
  • Why Cadavers have Ethical Significance
  • p. 57.
  • Searching for Parallels in Other Human Areas
  • p. 59.
  • Cadavers as a Teaching Tool
  • p. 64.
  • Perceptions of the Cadaver
  • p. 64.
  • Students' Experience of Dissection
  • p. 69.
  • Developing a Vision of the Interior of the Body
  • The
  • Centrality of Dissection for Understanding the Human Body
  • p. 72.
  • 3.
  • Acceptable and Unacceptable Uses of Cadavers and Tissues
  • p. 74.
  • Body Parts, Organs, and Tissues of the Body
  • p. 74.
  • Ownership of Material and Consent for Research
  • p. 75.
  • p. 4.
  • Use of Biopsies from Surgical Operations
  • p. 76.
  • Future Uses of Body Tissues
  • p. 77.
  • The
  • Place of Autopsies in the World of Medicine
  • p. 80.
  • Justifying Autopsies
  • p. 81.
  • Why Should Consent be Required for Autopsies?
  • The
  • p. 84.
  • Can Cadavers be Abused?
  • p. 86.
  • Teaching on the Clinically Dead
  • p. 87.
  • Research on the Clinically Dead
  • p. 90.
  • Trauma Research
  • p. 92.
  • Dead Mothers and Living Babies
Control code
42397273
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
xiii, 275 pages
Isbn
9780754620730
Lccn
99045032
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Label
Speaking for the dead : cadavers in biology and medicine, D. Gareth Jones
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 247-271) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • World of the Dead Body
  • p. 96.
  • Age of the Neomort: The Way of the Future?
  • p. 99.
  • Unethical Experiments on Humans-What Can They Teach Us?
  • p. 101.
  • The
  • Nazi Legacy-Background
  • p. 103.
  • The
  • Nazi Legacy-Contemporary Issues
  • p. 7.
  • p. 106.
  • Japanese Wartime Experiments
  • p. 109.
  • Unethical Experiments-When Moral Complicity Comes to the Fore
  • p. 110.
  • The
  • Legacy of Wartime Experimentation-Have We Learnt Anything?
  • p. 115.
  • 4.
  • Human Skeletal Remains: When Indigenous Concerns Conflict with Scientific Aspirations
  • The
  • p. 119.
  • Policy Developments
  • p. 121.
  • Contemporary Case Study
  • p. 123.
  • Scientific Interest and Indigenous Concerns
  • p. 127.
  • Assessing the Claims
  • p. 130.
  • Human Skeletal Material and Consent
  • Estranged World of Autopsies
  • p. 133.
  • Newly Discovered Remains
  • p. 135.
  • Human Remains of Prehistoric Origin
  • p. 136.
  • Past Mistreatment and Moral Complicity
  • p. 138.
  • Guidelines for Study of Human Skeletal Remains
  • p. 143.
  • The
  • p. 10.
  • Iroame
  • p. 145.
  • Skeletal Material as Teaching Tools
  • p. 147.
  • Past and Present Ethical Standards
  • p. 148.
  • 5.
  • Organ and Tissue Transplantation: Further Uses of Cadavers
  • p. 151.
  • Human Organ Transplantation
  • Disputed Corpses
  • p. 151.
  • Scientific and Clinical Developments
  • p. 151.
  • Donation of Cadaveric Organs
  • p. 153.
  • Consent in Cadaveric Organ Donation
  • p. 154.
  • Opt-In Policy (Informed Consent)
  • p. 155.
  • Opt-Out Policy (Presumed Consent)
  • p. 12.
  • p. 156.
  • Intermediate Positions
  • p. 160.
  • Cadavers as Life-Saving Devices
  • p. 163.
  • Organ Transplantation in Infants: The Use of Anencephalics
  • p. 164.
  • Neural Transplantation: The Use of Fetuses
  • p. 167.
  • Moral Complicity: An Exploration
  • Changing Perspectives with Time and Culture
  • p. 171.
  • Competing Ethical Frameworks
  • p. 177.
  • A
  • Network of Ethical Issues
  • p. 178.
  • Transplantation of Fetal Gametes for Assisted Fertilization
  • p. 181.
  • Stem Cells as Sources of Tissues and Organs
  • p. 183.
  • p. 15.
  • Xenotransplantation: Crossing Species Boundaries
  • p. 186.
  • Choosing an Animal Model
  • p. 187.
  • Xenozoonotic Infections
  • p. 188.
  • Ethical Objections
  • p. 190.
  • General Ethical Concerns
  • p. 192.
  • Locating Anatomy
  • Breaching Species Boundaries
  • p. 194.
  • 6.
  • Cadavers that May Not be Cadavers
  • p. 198.
  • Brain Death in Historical Context
  • p. 199.
  • Harvard Criteria
  • p. 199.
  • The
  • 1.
  • p. 16.
  • Developing Debate
  • p. 200.
  • Further Consequences
  • p. 201.
  • Definitions of Death and Brain Death
  • p. 203.
  • Equivalence of Death and Brain Death
  • p. 203.
  • Further Definitions of Brain Death
  • p. 205.
  • Defining Anatomy
  • Whole Brain Definition of Death
  • p. 207.
  • Objections to the Whole Brain Definition
  • p. 209.
  • Higher Brain Definition of Death
  • p. 212.
  • Objections to the Higher Brain Definition
  • p. 213.
  • Persistent Vegetative State
  • p. 215.
  • p. 17.
  • Questions and Queries
  • p. 215.
  • Description
  • p. 218.
  • Ethical Categories
  • p. 220.
  • Possibilities for Recovery
  • p. 222.
  • A
  • Continuum from Life to Death
  • Anatomy at Interfaces
  • p. 224.
  • 7.
  • Uses of Human Embryos and Fetuses
  • p. 226.
  • When are Human Embryos of Ethical Significance?-The Place of Biology
  • p. 226.
  • Pre-Embryo
  • p. 229.
  • Biological Characteristics of Early Development
  • p. 229.
  • p. 20.
  • Arguments Supporting the Pre-Embryo Concept
  • p. 230.
  • Extra-Embryonic Tissues and the Primitive Streak
  • p. 231.
  • Significance for Research on Human Tissues
  • p. 234.
  • From Brain Death to Brain Birth
  • p. 235.
  • The
  • Search for a Scientific Basis to Brain Birth
  • Implications for Anatomy as a Discipline
  • p. 236.
  • Assessment of the Brain Birth Concept
  • p. 238.
  • Is There More Than One Definition of Brain Birth?
  • p. 239.
  • From Brain Life to Brain Death
  • p. 240.
  • Embryos as Proto-Cadavers
  • p. 242
  • p. 22.
  • Anatomy and Art
  • p. 23.
  • Displaying Human Remains as Artistic Objects
  • Cadavers as Images of Ourselves
  • p. 23.
  • Plastination as an Art Form
  • p. 25.
  • The
  • Ethos and Ethics of Anatomical Science
  • p. 26.
  • 2.
  • History and Contemporary Ethos of Dissection
  • p. 32.
  • Anatomy, History and Society
  • p. 1.
  • p. 32.
  • Greek and Roman Influences
  • p. 32.
  • Medieval Developments
  • p. 35.
  • The
  • Ethical Significance of the Dead Body
  • p. 40.
  • Obtaining Bodies for Dissection
  • p. 44.
  • Anatomy and the Culture of Dissection
  • Historical Developments in Britain
  • p. 44.
  • Historical Developments in the United States
  • p. 47.
  • Experience and Legislation in Other Countries
  • p. 51.
  • Why People Bequeath their Bodies for Dissection
  • p. 54.
  • Is it Ethical to Use Unclaimed Bodies?
  • p. 57.
  • p. 2.
  • Why Cadavers have Ethical Significance
  • p. 57.
  • Searching for Parallels in Other Human Areas
  • p. 59.
  • Cadavers as a Teaching Tool
  • p. 64.
  • Perceptions of the Cadaver
  • p. 64.
  • Students' Experience of Dissection
  • p. 69.
  • Developing a Vision of the Interior of the Body
  • The
  • Centrality of Dissection for Understanding the Human Body
  • p. 72.
  • 3.
  • Acceptable and Unacceptable Uses of Cadavers and Tissues
  • p. 74.
  • Body Parts, Organs, and Tissues of the Body
  • p. 74.
  • Ownership of Material and Consent for Research
  • p. 75.
  • p. 4.
  • Use of Biopsies from Surgical Operations
  • p. 76.
  • Future Uses of Body Tissues
  • p. 77.
  • The
  • Place of Autopsies in the World of Medicine
  • p. 80.
  • Justifying Autopsies
  • p. 81.
  • Why Should Consent be Required for Autopsies?
  • The
  • p. 84.
  • Can Cadavers be Abused?
  • p. 86.
  • Teaching on the Clinically Dead
  • p. 87.
  • Research on the Clinically Dead
  • p. 90.
  • Trauma Research
  • p. 92.
  • Dead Mothers and Living Babies
Control code
42397273
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
xiii, 275 pages
Isbn
9780754620730
Lccn
99045032
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n

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      32.771471 -117.187496
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