Coverart for item
The Resource State responsibility, by Ian Brownlie

State responsibility, by Ian Brownlie

Label
State responsibility
Title
State responsibility
Statement of responsibility
by Ian Brownlie
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Brownlie, Ian
Index
index present
LC call number
K967
LC item number
.B76 1983
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
System of the law of nations / Ian Brownlie
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Government liability (International law)
Label
State responsibility, by Ian Brownlie
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • origins
  • Responsibility for Acts of State Organs and Agents
  • p. 132.
  • 1.
  • Introduction: the use of categories
  • 2.
  • Liability for acts of minor officials
  • 3.
  • What are state organs?
  • 4.
  • Heads of State and members of governments
  • 3.
  • 5.
  • Diplomatic agents and consular officers
  • 6.
  • Executive and administration
  • 7.
  • Armed forces
  • 8.
  • Federal units, provinces and other internal divisions
  • 9.
  • The
  • Systematic treatment in the literature, 1840-1930
  • legislature
  • 10.
  • The
  • judiciary
  • 11.
  • Ultra vires acts of organs and officials
  • 12.
  • Breaches of duty emerging from a system of administration or a general policy
  • 13.
  • Provenance of harm and failure to exercise proper control
  • 4.
  • 14.
  • Responsibility on the basis of approval and adoption of harmful acts
  • VIII.
  • Responsibility for the Acts of Private Persons
  • p. 159.
  • 2.
  • The
  • principles stated
  • 3.
  • Evaluation of the principles states
  • Special concerns of the literature
  • 4.
  • The
  • approach of the International Law Commission
  • 5.
  • The
  • burden of proof
  • 6.
  • Acts of private individuals (being nationals) outside state territory
  • IX.
  • Responsibility in Case of Insurrection and Civil War
  • II.
  • p. 167.
  • 1.
  • Considerations of principle
  • 2.
  • The
  • diverse positions
  • 3.
  • Arbitral jurisprudence
  • 4.
  • State practice
  • The
  • 5.
  • Assumption of responsibility by the respondent state
  • 6.
  • Routine administrative acts by organs of the insurgent or revolutionary forces
  • 7.
  • Granting an amnesty to insurgents
  • 8.
  • Relevance of recognition of belligerency
  • 9.
  • Responsibility for acts of successful insurgents
  • Question of Codification
  • 10.
  • Proviso: duties in respect of diplomatic agents and certain others
  • X.
  • Physical Control as an Element of Liability for Harmful Acts or Consequences Outside State Territory
  • p. 180.
  • 2.
  • Duties to control sources of danger within the state
  • 3.
  • Extra-territorial consequences of dangerous operations on state territory
  • 4.
  • p. 10.
  • Control of state organs operating beyond the frontiers
  • 5.
  • Responsibility arising from a duty to control the activities of private persons
  • 6.
  • Treaty provisions referring to jurisdiction
  • 7.
  • Acts of transferred or loaned officials or organs
  • 8.
  • Direction or control of another state
  • XI.
  • 2.
  • Joint Responsibility
  • p. 189.
  • 2.
  • Joint participation
  • 3.
  • Joint responsibility arising from certain relationships
  • XII.
  • Acts Having a Continuing Character
  • p. 193.
  • 2.
  • I.
  • Codification by private bodies
  • Acts becoming unlawful
  • 3.
  • Continuing acts
  • 4.
  • 'Composite' and 'complex' acts
  • XIII.
  • The
  • Forms and Function of Reparation
  • p. 199.
  • 2.
  • 3.
  • Declaratory judgments
  • 3.
  • Satisfaction
  • 4.
  • Restitution in kind and restitution in integrum
  • 5.
  • Compensation
  • 6.
  • Compensatory interest
  • 7.
  • The
  • Currency of valuation
  • 9.
  • Cases of 'direct injury' to the state interest
  • I.
  • Obligations of Result and Obligations of Means
  • p. 241.
  • II.
  • Canadian Claim for Damage Caused by Soviet Cosmos 954, 1978
  • p. 277.
  • III.
  • work of regional organizations and agencies
  • I.L.C. Draft Articles
  • p. 284
  • 4.
  • The
  • work of the League of Nations
  • 5.
  • Codification by the International Law Commission
  • 6.
  • The
  • The
  • feasibility of a convention
  • III.
  • The
  • Nature of State Responsibility
  • p. 22.
  • 2.
  • Examples of protest in state practice
  • 3.
  • The
  • History of State Responsibility
  • issue of responsibility and the issue of illegality
  • 4.
  • Is there a law of direct international wrongs?
  • 5.
  • The
  • problem of criminal responsibility
  • 6.
  • The
  • concept of sanctions
  • IV.
  • p. 1.
  • Conceptual Foundations
  • p. 35.
  • 2.
  • Imputability
  • 3.
  • Boundaries of responsibility
  • 4.
  • Objective responsibility
  • 5.
  • Controversy concerning fault and strict liability
  • 1.
  • 6.
  • The
  • proper role of fault (culpa)
  • 7.
  • Intention and motive
  • 8.
  • The
  • individuality of issues: the Corfu Channel Case
  • 9.
  • Liability for 'lawful acts'
  • Perspective
  • 10.
  • Abuse of rights
  • V.
  • Causes of Action in the Law of Nations
  • p. 53.
  • 2.
  • The
  • significance of defining a cause of action
  • 3.
  • A
  • 2.
  • calendar of causes of action
  • 4.
  • Concepts and distinctions
  • 5.
  • The
  • fundamental causes of action
  • 6.
  • General observations
  • VI.
  • Protest and Claim in the Practice of States
  • The
  • p. 89.
  • 2.
  • Types of state practice
  • 3.
  • Diplomatic correspondence
  • 4.
  • Claims settlements
  • 5.
  • Practice of the organs of the United Nations
  • VII.
Control code
9393556
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
volumes <1>
Isbn
9780198254522
Isbn Type
(v. 1)
Lccn
83004212
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Label
State responsibility, by Ian Brownlie
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • origins
  • Responsibility for Acts of State Organs and Agents
  • p. 132.
  • 1.
  • Introduction: the use of categories
  • 2.
  • Liability for acts of minor officials
  • 3.
  • What are state organs?
  • 4.
  • Heads of State and members of governments
  • 3.
  • 5.
  • Diplomatic agents and consular officers
  • 6.
  • Executive and administration
  • 7.
  • Armed forces
  • 8.
  • Federal units, provinces and other internal divisions
  • 9.
  • The
  • Systematic treatment in the literature, 1840-1930
  • legislature
  • 10.
  • The
  • judiciary
  • 11.
  • Ultra vires acts of organs and officials
  • 12.
  • Breaches of duty emerging from a system of administration or a general policy
  • 13.
  • Provenance of harm and failure to exercise proper control
  • 4.
  • 14.
  • Responsibility on the basis of approval and adoption of harmful acts
  • VIII.
  • Responsibility for the Acts of Private Persons
  • p. 159.
  • 2.
  • The
  • principles stated
  • 3.
  • Evaluation of the principles states
  • Special concerns of the literature
  • 4.
  • The
  • approach of the International Law Commission
  • 5.
  • The
  • burden of proof
  • 6.
  • Acts of private individuals (being nationals) outside state territory
  • IX.
  • Responsibility in Case of Insurrection and Civil War
  • II.
  • p. 167.
  • 1.
  • Considerations of principle
  • 2.
  • The
  • diverse positions
  • 3.
  • Arbitral jurisprudence
  • 4.
  • State practice
  • The
  • 5.
  • Assumption of responsibility by the respondent state
  • 6.
  • Routine administrative acts by organs of the insurgent or revolutionary forces
  • 7.
  • Granting an amnesty to insurgents
  • 8.
  • Relevance of recognition of belligerency
  • 9.
  • Responsibility for acts of successful insurgents
  • Question of Codification
  • 10.
  • Proviso: duties in respect of diplomatic agents and certain others
  • X.
  • Physical Control as an Element of Liability for Harmful Acts or Consequences Outside State Territory
  • p. 180.
  • 2.
  • Duties to control sources of danger within the state
  • 3.
  • Extra-territorial consequences of dangerous operations on state territory
  • 4.
  • p. 10.
  • Control of state organs operating beyond the frontiers
  • 5.
  • Responsibility arising from a duty to control the activities of private persons
  • 6.
  • Treaty provisions referring to jurisdiction
  • 7.
  • Acts of transferred or loaned officials or organs
  • 8.
  • Direction or control of another state
  • XI.
  • 2.
  • Joint Responsibility
  • p. 189.
  • 2.
  • Joint participation
  • 3.
  • Joint responsibility arising from certain relationships
  • XII.
  • Acts Having a Continuing Character
  • p. 193.
  • 2.
  • I.
  • Codification by private bodies
  • Acts becoming unlawful
  • 3.
  • Continuing acts
  • 4.
  • 'Composite' and 'complex' acts
  • XIII.
  • The
  • Forms and Function of Reparation
  • p. 199.
  • 2.
  • 3.
  • Declaratory judgments
  • 3.
  • Satisfaction
  • 4.
  • Restitution in kind and restitution in integrum
  • 5.
  • Compensation
  • 6.
  • Compensatory interest
  • 7.
  • The
  • Currency of valuation
  • 9.
  • Cases of 'direct injury' to the state interest
  • I.
  • Obligations of Result and Obligations of Means
  • p. 241.
  • II.
  • Canadian Claim for Damage Caused by Soviet Cosmos 954, 1978
  • p. 277.
  • III.
  • work of regional organizations and agencies
  • I.L.C. Draft Articles
  • p. 284
  • 4.
  • The
  • work of the League of Nations
  • 5.
  • Codification by the International Law Commission
  • 6.
  • The
  • The
  • feasibility of a convention
  • III.
  • The
  • Nature of State Responsibility
  • p. 22.
  • 2.
  • Examples of protest in state practice
  • 3.
  • The
  • History of State Responsibility
  • issue of responsibility and the issue of illegality
  • 4.
  • Is there a law of direct international wrongs?
  • 5.
  • The
  • problem of criminal responsibility
  • 6.
  • The
  • concept of sanctions
  • IV.
  • p. 1.
  • Conceptual Foundations
  • p. 35.
  • 2.
  • Imputability
  • 3.
  • Boundaries of responsibility
  • 4.
  • Objective responsibility
  • 5.
  • Controversy concerning fault and strict liability
  • 1.
  • 6.
  • The
  • proper role of fault (culpa)
  • 7.
  • Intention and motive
  • 8.
  • The
  • individuality of issues: the Corfu Channel Case
  • 9.
  • Liability for 'lawful acts'
  • Perspective
  • 10.
  • Abuse of rights
  • V.
  • Causes of Action in the Law of Nations
  • p. 53.
  • 2.
  • The
  • significance of defining a cause of action
  • 3.
  • A
  • 2.
  • calendar of causes of action
  • 4.
  • Concepts and distinctions
  • 5.
  • The
  • fundamental causes of action
  • 6.
  • General observations
  • VI.
  • Protest and Claim in the Practice of States
  • The
  • p. 89.
  • 2.
  • Types of state practice
  • 3.
  • Diplomatic correspondence
  • 4.
  • Claims settlements
  • 5.
  • Practice of the organs of the United Nations
  • VII.
Control code
9393556
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
volumes <1>
Isbn
9780198254522
Isbn Type
(v. 1)
Lccn
83004212
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n

Library Locations

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      32.771471 -117.187496
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