Coverart for item
The Resource Supply-side sustainability, T.F.H. Allen, Joseph A. Tainter, Thomas W. Hockstra

Supply-side sustainability, T.F.H. Allen, Joseph A. Tainter, Thomas W. Hockstra

Label
Supply-side sustainability
Title
Supply-side sustainability
Statement of responsibility
T.F.H. Allen, Joseph A. Tainter, Thomas W. Hockstra
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
While environmentalists insist that lower rates of consumption of natural resources are essential for a sustainable future, many economists dismiss the notion that resource limits act to constrain modern, creative societies. The conflict between these views tinges political debate at all levels and hinders our ability to plan for the future. Supply-Side Sustainability offers a fresh approach to this dilemma by integrating ecological and social science approaches in an interdisciplinary treatment of sustainability. Written by two ecologists and an anthropologist, this book disc
Member of
Is part of
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Allen, T. F. H
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Language note
In English
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Tainter, Joseph A
  • Hoekstra, T. W
Series statement
Complexity in ecological systems series
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Ecology
  • Sustainable development
  • SCIENCE
  • NATURE
  • NATURE
  • SCIENCE
  • SCIENCE
  • Ecology
  • Sustainable development
Label
Supply-side sustainability, T.F.H. Allen, Joseph A. Tainter, Thomas W. Hockstra
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 427-449) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Half title; Series Page; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Preface; 1. The Nature of the Problem; A New Global System; Economics, Society, and Ecology; Comprehending Sustainability; Manage Systems, Not Outputs; Manage Contexts; Supply What Systems Need; Let the Ecological System Subsidize Management; Understand Problem Solving; Sustainability in a Social Context; Paying for Sustainability; Maintaining the Political Context; The Ecology of Sustainability; Driven Between Disciplines by Technology; Prediction in Large Systems; Standard Practice for Different Reasons
  • Social and Biogeophysical IntegrationI. Complexity, Problem Solving, and Social Sustainability; 2. Complexity and Social Sustainability: Framework; Monitoring, Predicting, and Problem Solving; Complexity and Problem Solving; Producing Resources; Resources, Intensification, and Sustainability; Producing Knowledge; Summary and Implications for Sustainability; 3. Complexity and Social Sustainability: Experience; Collapse of the Western Roman Empire; Understanding Roman Unsustainability; The Early Byzantine Recovery; Collapse of the Abbasid Caliphate; Development of Modern Europe
  • Consequences of European WarsImplications for Sustainability; Some Characteristics of Sustainability; II. A Hierarchical Approach to Ecological Sustainability; 4. The Criteria for Observation and Modeling; The Organism; Sustaining the Umwelt; Habits and Familiar Settings; Rare and Endangered Umwelts; Stress and Unmet Umwelts; The Human Umwelt and Sustainability of Other Species; Living Systems Theory; Minimal Viable Systems; Organisms as Fragile Systems; The Landscape; Historical Landscapes in Context; Implications of Landscapes in a Human Context; Policy Implications on Landscapes
  • Landscapes Cast the ProblemThe Population; Sustainable Populations; Sustainability in Aquatic Populations; Sustainability and Human Populations; Modern Conservation Biology; Hierarchical Structure in Populations: Metapopulations; The Community; Community as Opposed to Population; Forest Stand Simulators: Community-Population Hybrids; Dynamics of the General Community Model; Taking the Community Model Through Scale Changes; Implications for Sustainability; Conclusion; 5. Biomes and the Biosphere; The Biome Criterion; Biomes and Climate Change; Sustainability of Agricultural Systems as Biomes
  • Lack of Sustainability in PaleobiomesGlobal Ecology; 6. Ecosystems, Energy Flows, Evolution, and Emergence; Definition of Ecosystem; The Essential Dichotomy in Biology; The Duality of Evolution and Thermodynamics; A Primer on the Mechanics of Thermodynamic Emergence; The Thermodynamics of Ecosystems; Experiments on the Generative Function; Observations on Ecosystems and Sustainability; Evolution, Emergence, and Diminishing Returns; Implications for the Contemporary Period; Supply-Side Sustainability and Resource Management Scale; Conclusion; 7. Retrospect and Prospects
Control code
ocm51491662
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xv, 459 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780231504072
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
Other control number
10.7312/alle10586
Other physical details
illustrations
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
  • 22573/ctt273dgn
  • 077afb30-5051-4df9-b5fe-ad3c688bb6fc
Publisher number
EB00662239
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)51491662
Label
Supply-side sustainability, T.F.H. Allen, Joseph A. Tainter, Thomas W. Hockstra
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 427-449) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Half title; Series Page; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Preface; 1. The Nature of the Problem; A New Global System; Economics, Society, and Ecology; Comprehending Sustainability; Manage Systems, Not Outputs; Manage Contexts; Supply What Systems Need; Let the Ecological System Subsidize Management; Understand Problem Solving; Sustainability in a Social Context; Paying for Sustainability; Maintaining the Political Context; The Ecology of Sustainability; Driven Between Disciplines by Technology; Prediction in Large Systems; Standard Practice for Different Reasons
  • Social and Biogeophysical IntegrationI. Complexity, Problem Solving, and Social Sustainability; 2. Complexity and Social Sustainability: Framework; Monitoring, Predicting, and Problem Solving; Complexity and Problem Solving; Producing Resources; Resources, Intensification, and Sustainability; Producing Knowledge; Summary and Implications for Sustainability; 3. Complexity and Social Sustainability: Experience; Collapse of the Western Roman Empire; Understanding Roman Unsustainability; The Early Byzantine Recovery; Collapse of the Abbasid Caliphate; Development of Modern Europe
  • Consequences of European WarsImplications for Sustainability; Some Characteristics of Sustainability; II. A Hierarchical Approach to Ecological Sustainability; 4. The Criteria for Observation and Modeling; The Organism; Sustaining the Umwelt; Habits and Familiar Settings; Rare and Endangered Umwelts; Stress and Unmet Umwelts; The Human Umwelt and Sustainability of Other Species; Living Systems Theory; Minimal Viable Systems; Organisms as Fragile Systems; The Landscape; Historical Landscapes in Context; Implications of Landscapes in a Human Context; Policy Implications on Landscapes
  • Landscapes Cast the ProblemThe Population; Sustainable Populations; Sustainability in Aquatic Populations; Sustainability and Human Populations; Modern Conservation Biology; Hierarchical Structure in Populations: Metapopulations; The Community; Community as Opposed to Population; Forest Stand Simulators: Community-Population Hybrids; Dynamics of the General Community Model; Taking the Community Model Through Scale Changes; Implications for Sustainability; Conclusion; 5. Biomes and the Biosphere; The Biome Criterion; Biomes and Climate Change; Sustainability of Agricultural Systems as Biomes
  • Lack of Sustainability in PaleobiomesGlobal Ecology; 6. Ecosystems, Energy Flows, Evolution, and Emergence; Definition of Ecosystem; The Essential Dichotomy in Biology; The Duality of Evolution and Thermodynamics; A Primer on the Mechanics of Thermodynamic Emergence; The Thermodynamics of Ecosystems; Experiments on the Generative Function; Observations on Ecosystems and Sustainability; Evolution, Emergence, and Diminishing Returns; Implications for the Contemporary Period; Supply-Side Sustainability and Resource Management Scale; Conclusion; 7. Retrospect and Prospects
Control code
ocm51491662
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xv, 459 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780231504072
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
Other control number
10.7312/alle10586
Other physical details
illustrations
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
  • 22573/ctt273dgn
  • 077afb30-5051-4df9-b5fe-ad3c688bb6fc
Publisher number
EB00662239
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)51491662

Library Locations

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      32.771354 -117.193327
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