Coverart for item
The Resource The Scottish invention of America, democracy and human rights : a history of liberty and freedom from the ancient Celts to the New Millennium, Alexander Leslie Klieforth, Robert John Munro

The Scottish invention of America, democracy and human rights : a history of liberty and freedom from the ancient Celts to the New Millennium, Alexander Leslie Klieforth, Robert John Munro

Label
The Scottish invention of America, democracy and human rights : a history of liberty and freedom from the ancient Celts to the New Millennium
Title
The Scottish invention of America, democracy and human rights
Title remainder
a history of liberty and freedom from the ancient Celts to the New Millennium
Statement of responsibility
Alexander Leslie Klieforth, Robert John Munro
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
The Scottish Invention of America, Democracy and Human Rights is a history of liberty from 1300 BC to 2004 AD. The book traces the history of the philosophy and fight for freedom from the ancient Celts to the medieval Scots to the Scottish Enlightenment to the creation of America. The work contends that the roots of liberty originated in the radical political thought of the ancient Celts, the Scots' struggle for freedom, John Duns Scotus and the Scottish declaration of independence (Arbroath, 1320) that were the primary basis of the American Declaration of Independence and the modern human rights movement
Cataloging source
FUB
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Klieforth, Alexander Leslie
Index
index present
LC call number
DA772
LC item number
.K554 2004
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Munro, Robert John
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Celts
  • Civilization, Celtic
  • Civilization, Modern
  • Human rights
  • National characteristics, Scottish
  • Scotland
  • Scotland
  • United States
Label
The Scottish invention of America, democracy and human rights : a history of liberty and freedom from the ancient Celts to the New Millennium, Alexander Leslie Klieforth, Robert John Munro
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [401]-427) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • p. 5.
  • Chapter 24.
  • An
  • Analysis of the Style and Logic of the American Declaration
  • p. 255.
  • Chapter 25.
  • A
  • Comparison of the Arbroath Declaration and the Declaration of Independence
  • p. 263.
  • Chapter 26.
  • The
  • Chapter 3.
  • Scottish Influence on the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the New Federal Government
  • p. 269.
  • The
  • Text of the American Bill of Rights
  • p. 276.
  • Chapter 27.
  • The
  • Controversy: The Comparative Influences of the Celtic-Arbroath Philosophy and the Scottish Enlightenment versus English Philosophy and Law on the Creation of the Declaration of Independence and the American Republic
  • p. 279.
  • Part 3.
  • The
  • The
  • Age of Rights of Mankind: How the Declaration of 1776 Carried World-Wide the Ideology of 1320 to the New Millennium
  • p. 293.
  • Chapter 28.
  • The
  • Effect of the Declaration of Independence on Scottish and British Political Reform
  • p. 293.
  • Chapter 29.
  • The
  • Declaration of Independence, the French Revolution and the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen
  • Celts--The People Who Disappeared Into the Shadows
  • p. 297.
  • Chapter 30.
  • Abraham Lincoln's Transformation of the Declaration of Independence from Freedom and Liberty to Equality
  • p. 299.
  • The
  • Text of the Gettysburg Address
  • p. 301.
  • Chapter 31.
  • The
  • Ideology of 1320 and 1776 and the Global Independence and Human Rights Movements
  • p. 13.
  • p. 303.
  • Chapter 32.
  • The
  • Scots, American and French Declarations and the Third World
  • p. 309.
  • Chapter 33.
  • And We Return to scotland and England: The Scottish Parliament
  • p. 311.
  • Chapter 34.
  • 209 Years Later, the English, the Scots and the Welsh Get an American-Style Bill of Rights
  • Chapter 4.
  • p. 317
  • The
  • Blossoming of Celtic Culture
  • p. 25.
  • Chapter 5.
  • Part 1.
  • The
  • Thistle Takes Root: Celtic Scotland
  • p. 37.
  • Chapter 6.
  • Veni, Vidi Sed Non Vici
  • p. 51.
  • Chapter 7.
  • The
  • Four Founding Peoples and Their Kingdoms
  • p. 61.
  • Scotland the Brave
  • Chapter 8.
  • The
  • Celts and Supernatural Life
  • p. 79.
  • Chapter 9.
  • The
  • Scandinavians
  • p. 95.
  • Chapter 10.
  • The
  • p. 1.
  • Forging of a Nation
  • p. 107.
  • Chapter 11.
  • The
  • Normans
  • p. 117.
  • Chapter 12.
  • The
  • House of Canmore
  • p. 133.
  • Chapter 1.
  • Chapter 13.
  • The
  • Fall of the House of Canmore
  • p. 145.
  • Chapter 14.
  • He Who Sows the Wind ...
  • p. 155.
  • Chapter 15.
  • ... Shall Reap the Whirlwind
  • p. 165.
  • Ceud Mille Failte!
  • Chapter 16.
  • Robert the Bruce
  • p. 171.
  • Chapter 17.
  • Medieval Scotland and John Duns Scotus
  • p. 177.
  • Chapter 18.
  • The
  • Declaration of Arbroath
  • p. 185.
  • p. 1.
  • Text of the Declaration of Arbroath in English
  • p. 190.
  • Text of the Declaration of Arbroath in Medieval Latin
  • p. 194.
  • Chapter 19.
  • From the Arbroath Declaration to the Scottish Enlightenment
  • p. 197.
  • Chapter 20.
  • The
  • Scottish Enlightenment
  • Chapter 2.
  • p. 213.
  • Part 2.
  • The
  • Scottish Invention of America, Thomas Jefferson, The Arbroath Declaration and the Declaration of Independence
  • p. 227.
  • Chapter 21.
  • The
  • Scottish Enlightenment in the United States
  • p. 229.
  • Chapter 22.
  • Genesis
  • The
  • Scottish Mind of Thomas Jefferson
  • p. 241.
  • Chapter 23.
  • The
  • Drafting of the Declaration of Independence
  • p. 245.
  • The
  • Text of the First Printing of the Declaration of Independence as Inserted in the Rough Journal of Congress
  • p. 251.
Control code
55139832
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
xii, 434 pages
Isbn
9780761827917
Isbn Type
(pbk. : alk. paper)
Lccn
2003117059
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Label
The Scottish invention of America, democracy and human rights : a history of liberty and freedom from the ancient Celts to the New Millennium, Alexander Leslie Klieforth, Robert John Munro
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [401]-427) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • p. 5.
  • Chapter 24.
  • An
  • Analysis of the Style and Logic of the American Declaration
  • p. 255.
  • Chapter 25.
  • A
  • Comparison of the Arbroath Declaration and the Declaration of Independence
  • p. 263.
  • Chapter 26.
  • The
  • Chapter 3.
  • Scottish Influence on the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the New Federal Government
  • p. 269.
  • The
  • Text of the American Bill of Rights
  • p. 276.
  • Chapter 27.
  • The
  • Controversy: The Comparative Influences of the Celtic-Arbroath Philosophy and the Scottish Enlightenment versus English Philosophy and Law on the Creation of the Declaration of Independence and the American Republic
  • p. 279.
  • Part 3.
  • The
  • The
  • Age of Rights of Mankind: How the Declaration of 1776 Carried World-Wide the Ideology of 1320 to the New Millennium
  • p. 293.
  • Chapter 28.
  • The
  • Effect of the Declaration of Independence on Scottish and British Political Reform
  • p. 293.
  • Chapter 29.
  • The
  • Declaration of Independence, the French Revolution and the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen
  • Celts--The People Who Disappeared Into the Shadows
  • p. 297.
  • Chapter 30.
  • Abraham Lincoln's Transformation of the Declaration of Independence from Freedom and Liberty to Equality
  • p. 299.
  • The
  • Text of the Gettysburg Address
  • p. 301.
  • Chapter 31.
  • The
  • Ideology of 1320 and 1776 and the Global Independence and Human Rights Movements
  • p. 13.
  • p. 303.
  • Chapter 32.
  • The
  • Scots, American and French Declarations and the Third World
  • p. 309.
  • Chapter 33.
  • And We Return to scotland and England: The Scottish Parliament
  • p. 311.
  • Chapter 34.
  • 209 Years Later, the English, the Scots and the Welsh Get an American-Style Bill of Rights
  • Chapter 4.
  • p. 317
  • The
  • Blossoming of Celtic Culture
  • p. 25.
  • Chapter 5.
  • Part 1.
  • The
  • Thistle Takes Root: Celtic Scotland
  • p. 37.
  • Chapter 6.
  • Veni, Vidi Sed Non Vici
  • p. 51.
  • Chapter 7.
  • The
  • Four Founding Peoples and Their Kingdoms
  • p. 61.
  • Scotland the Brave
  • Chapter 8.
  • The
  • Celts and Supernatural Life
  • p. 79.
  • Chapter 9.
  • The
  • Scandinavians
  • p. 95.
  • Chapter 10.
  • The
  • p. 1.
  • Forging of a Nation
  • p. 107.
  • Chapter 11.
  • The
  • Normans
  • p. 117.
  • Chapter 12.
  • The
  • House of Canmore
  • p. 133.
  • Chapter 1.
  • Chapter 13.
  • The
  • Fall of the House of Canmore
  • p. 145.
  • Chapter 14.
  • He Who Sows the Wind ...
  • p. 155.
  • Chapter 15.
  • ... Shall Reap the Whirlwind
  • p. 165.
  • Ceud Mille Failte!
  • Chapter 16.
  • Robert the Bruce
  • p. 171.
  • Chapter 17.
  • Medieval Scotland and John Duns Scotus
  • p. 177.
  • Chapter 18.
  • The
  • Declaration of Arbroath
  • p. 185.
  • p. 1.
  • Text of the Declaration of Arbroath in English
  • p. 190.
  • Text of the Declaration of Arbroath in Medieval Latin
  • p. 194.
  • Chapter 19.
  • From the Arbroath Declaration to the Scottish Enlightenment
  • p. 197.
  • Chapter 20.
  • The
  • Scottish Enlightenment
  • Chapter 2.
  • p. 213.
  • Part 2.
  • The
  • Scottish Invention of America, Thomas Jefferson, The Arbroath Declaration and the Declaration of Independence
  • p. 227.
  • Chapter 21.
  • The
  • Scottish Enlightenment in the United States
  • p. 229.
  • Chapter 22.
  • Genesis
  • The
  • Scottish Mind of Thomas Jefferson
  • p. 241.
  • Chapter 23.
  • The
  • Drafting of the Declaration of Independence
  • p. 245.
  • The
  • Text of the First Printing of the Declaration of Independence as Inserted in the Rough Journal of Congress
  • p. 251.
Control code
55139832
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
xii, 434 pages
Isbn
9780761827917
Isbn Type
(pbk. : alk. paper)
Lccn
2003117059
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n

Library Locations

    • Pardee Legal Research CenterBorrow it
      5998 Alcalá Park, San Diego, CA, 92110-2492, US
      32.771471 -117.187496
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