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The Resource The basic problems of phenomenology, Martin Heidegger ; translation, introduction, and lexicon by Albert Hofstadter

The basic problems of phenomenology, Martin Heidegger ; translation, introduction, and lexicon by Albert Hofstadter

Label
The basic problems of phenomenology
Title
The basic problems of phenomenology
Statement of responsibility
Martin Heidegger ; translation, introduction, and lexicon by Albert Hofstadter
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • ger
  • eng
Summary
Continues and extends explorations begun in Being and Time
Member of
Action
digitized
Cataloging source
OCLCE
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1889-1976
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Heidegger, Martin
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Studies in phenomenology and existential philosophy
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Phenomenology
  • Phénoménologie
  • PHILOSOPHY
  • PHILOSOPHY
  • PHILOSOPHY
  • PHILOSOPHY
  • Phenomenology
Label
The basic problems of phenomenology, Martin Heidegger ; translation, introduction, and lexicon by Albert Hofstadter
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
file reproduced from original
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
black and white
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Title; Copyright; Contents; Translator's Preface; Translators Introduction; Introduction; 1. Exposition and general division of the theme; 2. The concept of philosophy. Philosophy and world-view; 3. Philosophy as science of being; 4. The four theses about being and the basic problems of phenomenology; 5. The character of ontological method. The three basic components of phenomenological method; 6. Outline of the course; Part One: Critical Phenomenological Discussion of Some Traditional Theses about Being; Chapter One Kant's Thesis: Being is not a Real Predicate
  • 7. The content of the Kantian thesis 8. Phenomenological analysis of the explanation of the concept of being or of existence given by Kant; a) Being (existence [Dasein, Existenz, Vorhandensein]), absolute position, and perception; b) Perceiving, perceived, perceivedness. Distinction between perceivedness and the extantness of the extant; 9. Demonstration of the need for a more fundamental formulation of the problem of the thesis and of a more radical foundation of this problem; a) The inadequacy of psychology as a positive science for the ontological elucidation of perception
  • B) The ontological constitution of perception. Intentionality and transcendencec) Intentionality and understanding of being. Uncoveredness (perceivedness) of beings and disclosedness of being; Chapter Two The Thesis of Medieval Ontology Derived from Aristotle: To the Constitution of the Being of a Being There Belong Essence and Existence; 10. The content of the thesis and its traditional discussion; a) Preview of the traditional context of inquiry for the distinction between essentia and existentia
  • 11. Phenomenological clarification of the problem underlying the second thesisa) The question of the origin of essentia and existentia; b) Return to the productive comportment of the Dasein toward beings as implicit horizon of understanding for essentia and existentia; 12. Proof of the inadequate foundation of the traditional treatment of the problem; a) Intentional structure and the understanding of being in productive comportment; b) The inner connection between ancient (medieval) and Kantian ontology
Control code
ocn610050977
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xxxi, 396 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780253013262
Level of compression
  • lossless
  • lossy
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
  • 22573/ctt1bz3s66
  • a361cb57-807f-473a-a680-211fe47220cc
Publisher number
MWT11648766
Reformatting quality
  • preservation
  • access
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)610050977
System details
Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002.
Label
The basic problems of phenomenology, Martin Heidegger ; translation, introduction, and lexicon by Albert Hofstadter
Publication
Antecedent source
file reproduced from original
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
black and white
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Title; Copyright; Contents; Translator's Preface; Translators Introduction; Introduction; 1. Exposition and general division of the theme; 2. The concept of philosophy. Philosophy and world-view; 3. Philosophy as science of being; 4. The four theses about being and the basic problems of phenomenology; 5. The character of ontological method. The three basic components of phenomenological method; 6. Outline of the course; Part One: Critical Phenomenological Discussion of Some Traditional Theses about Being; Chapter One Kant's Thesis: Being is not a Real Predicate
  • 7. The content of the Kantian thesis 8. Phenomenological analysis of the explanation of the concept of being or of existence given by Kant; a) Being (existence [Dasein, Existenz, Vorhandensein]), absolute position, and perception; b) Perceiving, perceived, perceivedness. Distinction between perceivedness and the extantness of the extant; 9. Demonstration of the need for a more fundamental formulation of the problem of the thesis and of a more radical foundation of this problem; a) The inadequacy of psychology as a positive science for the ontological elucidation of perception
  • B) The ontological constitution of perception. Intentionality and transcendencec) Intentionality and understanding of being. Uncoveredness (perceivedness) of beings and disclosedness of being; Chapter Two The Thesis of Medieval Ontology Derived from Aristotle: To the Constitution of the Being of a Being There Belong Essence and Existence; 10. The content of the thesis and its traditional discussion; a) Preview of the traditional context of inquiry for the distinction between essentia and existentia
  • 11. Phenomenological clarification of the problem underlying the second thesisa) The question of the origin of essentia and existentia; b) Return to the productive comportment of the Dasein toward beings as implicit horizon of understanding for essentia and existentia; 12. Proof of the inadequate foundation of the traditional treatment of the problem; a) Intentional structure and the understanding of being in productive comportment; b) The inner connection between ancient (medieval) and Kantian ontology
Control code
ocn610050977
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xxxi, 396 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780253013262
Level of compression
  • lossless
  • lossy
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
  • 22573/ctt1bz3s66
  • a361cb57-807f-473a-a680-211fe47220cc
Publisher number
MWT11648766
Reformatting quality
  • preservation
  • access
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)610050977
System details
Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002.

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