Coverart for item
The Resource The early Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of southern Britain, AD 450-650 : beneath the Tribal Hidage, Sue Harrington and Martin Welch

The early Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of southern Britain, AD 450-650 : beneath the Tribal Hidage, Sue Harrington and Martin Welch

Label
The early Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of southern Britain, AD 450-650 : beneath the Tribal Hidage
Title
The early Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of southern Britain, AD 450-650
Title remainder
beneath the Tribal Hidage
Statement of responsibility
Sue Harrington and Martin Welch
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Harrington, Sue
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Welch, Martin G
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Anglo-Saxons
  • Great Britain
  • Tribes
  • Hidage
  • Civilization, Anglo-Saxon
  • HISTORY
  • Anglo-Saxons
  • Civilization, Anglo-Saxon
  • Hidage
  • Tribes
  • England
  • Great Britain
  • HISTORY / Medieval
Label
The early Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of southern Britain, AD 450-650 : beneath the Tribal Hidage, Sue Harrington and Martin Welch
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • How can this evidence be explained and interpreted -- is this evidence of wealth creation and state formation?
  • 8.
  • Community Wealth in Iron Compared
  • Iron case study 1: shield bosses (AD 450 -- 700)
  • Iron case study 2: swords (AD 450 -- 700)
  • Iron case study 3: knives (AD 450 -- 700)
  • The iron-wealth over time and space (AD 450 -- 700)
  • Phase A comparative study
  • Phase B comparative study
  • Phase C comparative study
  • Conclusions on the value of iron in the study region and period
  • Methodology
  • 9.
  • A Restricted Wealth in Copper Alloys?
  • European copper alloy production
  • Copper alloy production in Britain
  • Weights of copper alloy artefacts
  • Community access to copper alloy material over time and space
  • Phase A comparative study
  • Phase B comparative study
  • Phase C comparative study
  • Copper alloy case study 1: buckle loops and plates
  • Overview of the contents of this volume
  • Copper alloy case study 2: bowls and escutcheons
  • Phase A distribution of copper alloy bowls
  • Phase B distribution of copper alloy bowls
  • Phase C distribution of copper alloy bowls
  • Sheet vessel fragments
  • Escutcheons
  • Conclusions on copper alloy bowl distributions
  • 10.
  • Esoteric Materials: Amber, Amethyst, Gold and Silver
  • Case study: amber beads
  • 2.
  • Case study: amethyst beads
  • Conclusions concerning amber and amethyst bead usage and distribution
  • The role of precious metals: gold and silver
  • Gold
  • Phase A gold distribution
  • Phases B and C gold distribution
  • Silver
  • Phase A silver distributions
  • Phase B silver distributions
  • Phase C silver distributions
  • The Early Anglo-Saxon Census
  • Conclusions
  • 11.
  • External Forces? A Review of the Frankish Influence within Southern Britain
  • 12.
  • The Frankish Data Examined
  • Research questions
  • Phase A Frankish data
  • Frankish artefacts in Kent and Surrey
  • Isle of Wight
  • Westwards from the East Sussex coast
  • Southern Britain south of the Thames and the archaeological data
  • Central Wiltshire and the Salisbury Plain
  • Upper Thames Valley
  • Conclusions relating to Phase A
  • Phase B Frankish data
  • Phase C Frankish data
  • Frankish weapon burials
  • Conclusions
  • 13.
  • Synthesis: Beneath the Tribal Hidage
  • The database
  • Data-quality assessment
  • The dating framework
  • The sites
  • 1.
  • Populating the landscape
  • These individuals and their graves
  • Phasing the burials
  • The artefacts
  • Type
  • Provenance
  • Regional
  • Kentish; Saxon; Anglian; Wessex
  • Romano-British
  • British West
  • The Early Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms of Southern Britain: evidence and questions
  • Curated/Roman; Curated/Jutlandic
  • Kentish/
  • Imported
  • Imported/
  • Position in grave
  • Material component
  • Object weights
  • Findspots and their contents
  • Other datasets used
  • Late Roman sites
  • Introduction
  • Place-name evidence
  • Concluding remarks
  • 3.
  • The Environmental Context of Southern Britain
  • Introduction
  • Mapping the evidence
  • The geology of southern Britain
  • Definitions of landscape units
  • Soil types and fertility: the mapping of land use potential
  • A new definition of landscape units in southern Britain
  • The kingdoms in the written sources (text by Martin Welch, edited by Barbara Yorke)
  • Climate
  • Rivers and floodplains
  • Palaeo-environmental evidence
  • Woodland
  • 4.
  • Travelling and Using the Land- and Sea-Scapes
  • Coastal erosion and tide patterns
  • Changes to the southern coast of Britain
  • Roads, droveways and trackways south of the Thames
  • Agricultural practices
  • Research questions
  • Pastoral practices
  • The environmental evidence from selected excavation reports for southern Britain
  • The Upper Thames Valley and chalklands to the south
  • Central chalk lands to the south coast
  • The eastern area of the Thames, the Weald and the coast
  • The western area
  • Conclusions
  • 5.
  • Sites, Locations and Soils
  • Introduction
  • What are the data?
  • Theories of site location
  • Settlement and wealth in the three kingdoms
  • Kent
  • Wessex
  • Sussex
  • What was the spatial relationship between early cemeteries and their parent settlements?
  • Case study: The Lower Ouse Valley, East Sussex
  • Where were the sites with the earliest artefactual evidence?
  • What are the spatial relationships of the cemeteries and settlements to routeways and other topographical features?
  • What kinds of soils do the cemetery/settlement communities occupy for their resource base and how does this compare with those occupied by the Later Roman sites? Were there spatial and temporal variations in site selection criteria?
  • What is the landscape context of that data?
  • Roman sites
  • Early Anglo-Saxon complexes
  • What relationships can be determined between the place-name data and the phase A and early phase B sites (AD 450 -- 600)?
  • Conclusions
  • 6.
  • Surrey: A Case Study
  • Surrey in the documentary sources
  • The archaeological evidence
  • Conclusions
  • 7.
  • Why is the data located within this context -- what were the criteria behind site location selection?
  • A Common Wealth in Iron?
  • Introduction
  • Sources of iron ore
  • The regional settlement pattern and proximity to iron ore deposits
  • The processes of iron working
  • Iron working in Roman Britain
  • Iron working in the Western Roman Empire
  • Iron working in the northern European Barbaricum in the study period (AD 450 -- 650)
  • Iron working in southern Britain AD 450 -- 650 and later
  • Discussion
Control code
ocn879034171
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781782976158
Lccn
2014017520
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctvgzc7j3
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)879034171
Label
The early Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of southern Britain, AD 450-650 : beneath the Tribal Hidage, Sue Harrington and Martin Welch
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • How can this evidence be explained and interpreted -- is this evidence of wealth creation and state formation?
  • 8.
  • Community Wealth in Iron Compared
  • Iron case study 1: shield bosses (AD 450 -- 700)
  • Iron case study 2: swords (AD 450 -- 700)
  • Iron case study 3: knives (AD 450 -- 700)
  • The iron-wealth over time and space (AD 450 -- 700)
  • Phase A comparative study
  • Phase B comparative study
  • Phase C comparative study
  • Conclusions on the value of iron in the study region and period
  • Methodology
  • 9.
  • A Restricted Wealth in Copper Alloys?
  • European copper alloy production
  • Copper alloy production in Britain
  • Weights of copper alloy artefacts
  • Community access to copper alloy material over time and space
  • Phase A comparative study
  • Phase B comparative study
  • Phase C comparative study
  • Copper alloy case study 1: buckle loops and plates
  • Overview of the contents of this volume
  • Copper alloy case study 2: bowls and escutcheons
  • Phase A distribution of copper alloy bowls
  • Phase B distribution of copper alloy bowls
  • Phase C distribution of copper alloy bowls
  • Sheet vessel fragments
  • Escutcheons
  • Conclusions on copper alloy bowl distributions
  • 10.
  • Esoteric Materials: Amber, Amethyst, Gold and Silver
  • Case study: amber beads
  • 2.
  • Case study: amethyst beads
  • Conclusions concerning amber and amethyst bead usage and distribution
  • The role of precious metals: gold and silver
  • Gold
  • Phase A gold distribution
  • Phases B and C gold distribution
  • Silver
  • Phase A silver distributions
  • Phase B silver distributions
  • Phase C silver distributions
  • The Early Anglo-Saxon Census
  • Conclusions
  • 11.
  • External Forces? A Review of the Frankish Influence within Southern Britain
  • 12.
  • The Frankish Data Examined
  • Research questions
  • Phase A Frankish data
  • Frankish artefacts in Kent and Surrey
  • Isle of Wight
  • Westwards from the East Sussex coast
  • Southern Britain south of the Thames and the archaeological data
  • Central Wiltshire and the Salisbury Plain
  • Upper Thames Valley
  • Conclusions relating to Phase A
  • Phase B Frankish data
  • Phase C Frankish data
  • Frankish weapon burials
  • Conclusions
  • 13.
  • Synthesis: Beneath the Tribal Hidage
  • The database
  • Data-quality assessment
  • The dating framework
  • The sites
  • 1.
  • Populating the landscape
  • These individuals and their graves
  • Phasing the burials
  • The artefacts
  • Type
  • Provenance
  • Regional
  • Kentish; Saxon; Anglian; Wessex
  • Romano-British
  • British West
  • The Early Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms of Southern Britain: evidence and questions
  • Curated/Roman; Curated/Jutlandic
  • Kentish/
  • Imported
  • Imported/
  • Position in grave
  • Material component
  • Object weights
  • Findspots and their contents
  • Other datasets used
  • Late Roman sites
  • Introduction
  • Place-name evidence
  • Concluding remarks
  • 3.
  • The Environmental Context of Southern Britain
  • Introduction
  • Mapping the evidence
  • The geology of southern Britain
  • Definitions of landscape units
  • Soil types and fertility: the mapping of land use potential
  • A new definition of landscape units in southern Britain
  • The kingdoms in the written sources (text by Martin Welch, edited by Barbara Yorke)
  • Climate
  • Rivers and floodplains
  • Palaeo-environmental evidence
  • Woodland
  • 4.
  • Travelling and Using the Land- and Sea-Scapes
  • Coastal erosion and tide patterns
  • Changes to the southern coast of Britain
  • Roads, droveways and trackways south of the Thames
  • Agricultural practices
  • Research questions
  • Pastoral practices
  • The environmental evidence from selected excavation reports for southern Britain
  • The Upper Thames Valley and chalklands to the south
  • Central chalk lands to the south coast
  • The eastern area of the Thames, the Weald and the coast
  • The western area
  • Conclusions
  • 5.
  • Sites, Locations and Soils
  • Introduction
  • What are the data?
  • Theories of site location
  • Settlement and wealth in the three kingdoms
  • Kent
  • Wessex
  • Sussex
  • What was the spatial relationship between early cemeteries and their parent settlements?
  • Case study: The Lower Ouse Valley, East Sussex
  • Where were the sites with the earliest artefactual evidence?
  • What are the spatial relationships of the cemeteries and settlements to routeways and other topographical features?
  • What kinds of soils do the cemetery/settlement communities occupy for their resource base and how does this compare with those occupied by the Later Roman sites? Were there spatial and temporal variations in site selection criteria?
  • What is the landscape context of that data?
  • Roman sites
  • Early Anglo-Saxon complexes
  • What relationships can be determined between the place-name data and the phase A and early phase B sites (AD 450 -- 600)?
  • Conclusions
  • 6.
  • Surrey: A Case Study
  • Surrey in the documentary sources
  • The archaeological evidence
  • Conclusions
  • 7.
  • Why is the data located within this context -- what were the criteria behind site location selection?
  • A Common Wealth in Iron?
  • Introduction
  • Sources of iron ore
  • The regional settlement pattern and proximity to iron ore deposits
  • The processes of iron working
  • Iron working in Roman Britain
  • Iron working in the Western Roman Empire
  • Iron working in the northern European Barbaricum in the study period (AD 450 -- 650)
  • Iron working in southern Britain AD 450 -- 650 and later
  • Discussion
Control code
ocn879034171
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781782976158
Lccn
2014017520
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctvgzc7j3
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)879034171

Library Locations

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      32.771354 -117.193327
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