Coverart for item
The Resource The fifteen confederates, Johann Eberlin von Günzburg ; translated by Geoffrey Dipple

The fifteen confederates, Johann Eberlin von Günzburg ; translated by Geoffrey Dipple

Label
The fifteen confederates
Title
The fifteen confederates
Statement of responsibility
Johann Eberlin von Günzburg ; translated by Geoffrey Dipple
Creator
Contributor
Author
Translator
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • ger
  • eng
Summary
The Fifteen Confederates' are a collection of pamphlets ostensibly written by a group of laymen, the confederates, who had sworn together to address the religious, social, economic, and political problems facing the German nation in the early years of the Protestant Reformation. This translation of 'The Fifteen Confederates' is based on the German critical edition by Ludwig Enders published in 1896
Cataloging source
UKMGB
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
approximately 1470-1533
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Eberlin von Günzburg, Johann
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Dipple, Geoffrey
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Reformation
  • HISTORY
  • RELIGION
  • Reformation
  • Germany
  • Germany
  • Reformation
  • Religion
Label
The fifteen confederates, Johann Eberlin von Günzburg ; translated by Geoffrey Dipple
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Translated from the German
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
  • Front cover; Half title; Title page; Copyright; Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Note on Translation; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1. The First Confederate; A pitiful complaint to the Christian Emperor Charles concerning Doctor Martin Luther and Ulrich von Hutten. Also concerning the courtiers and mendicant friars. That His Majesty not allow himself to be led astray by such people.; 2. The Second Confederate; Concerning the forty day fast before Easter and others, and how wretchedly the Christian people are burdened by them.; 3. The Third Confederate
  • An admonition to all Christians that they take pity on cloistered women. 4. The Fourth Confederate; On the long, wearisome braying which the spiritual monks, priests, and nuns call the canonical hours.; 5. The Fifth Confederate; An exhortation to all authorities of the German Nation that they reform the pulpit.; 6. The Sixth Confederate; Erasmus of Rotterdam, a prince among learned men in our age, writes about the preaching of the mendicant friars in the book entitled Encomion Morias.; 7. The Seventh Confederate; In praise of parish priests.; 8. The Eighth Confederate
  • Why Sir Erasmus of Rotterdam is translated into German. Why Martin Luther and Sir Ulrich von Hutten write in German. 9. The Ninth Confederate; To all Christian authorities, both worldly and spiritual, of the German Nation, a wretched, fervent lamentation of all God-fearing monks, nuns and priests that one should come to their aid and save them from their unchristian neighbors.; 10. The Tenth Confederate; New statutes concerning reform of the spiritual estate which Psittacus brought from the land of Wellfaria.; 11. The Eleventh Confederate
  • A new ordinance concerning the secular estate written in Wellfaria, as described by Psittacus. 12. The Twelfth Confederate; A friendly response of all God-fearing, decent, reasonable people in the German land to the pitiful complaint made to them by those in orders.; 13. The Thirteenth Confederate; A hopeful exhortation to the upright, honorable, strong, and Christian lords, officials, and subjects of the Common Confederacy (known as the Swiss) that they faithfully help to preserve evangelical teaching and devout Christians.; 14. The Fourteenth Confederate
  • Sir Erasmus of Rotterdam reveals in the book Encomion Morias the shameful service we render to the saints. 15. The Fifteenth Confederate; To each and every believer in Christ, a wholesome warning to guard against new, dangerous teachings.; Select Bibliography; Back cover
Control code
ocn890393167
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780227902899
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctt1cg7zd3
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)890393167
Label
The fifteen confederates, Johann Eberlin von Günzburg ; translated by Geoffrey Dipple
Publication
Note
Translated from the German
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
  • Front cover; Half title; Title page; Copyright; Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Note on Translation; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1. The First Confederate; A pitiful complaint to the Christian Emperor Charles concerning Doctor Martin Luther and Ulrich von Hutten. Also concerning the courtiers and mendicant friars. That His Majesty not allow himself to be led astray by such people.; 2. The Second Confederate; Concerning the forty day fast before Easter and others, and how wretchedly the Christian people are burdened by them.; 3. The Third Confederate
  • An admonition to all Christians that they take pity on cloistered women. 4. The Fourth Confederate; On the long, wearisome braying which the spiritual monks, priests, and nuns call the canonical hours.; 5. The Fifth Confederate; An exhortation to all authorities of the German Nation that they reform the pulpit.; 6. The Sixth Confederate; Erasmus of Rotterdam, a prince among learned men in our age, writes about the preaching of the mendicant friars in the book entitled Encomion Morias.; 7. The Seventh Confederate; In praise of parish priests.; 8. The Eighth Confederate
  • Why Sir Erasmus of Rotterdam is translated into German. Why Martin Luther and Sir Ulrich von Hutten write in German. 9. The Ninth Confederate; To all Christian authorities, both worldly and spiritual, of the German Nation, a wretched, fervent lamentation of all God-fearing monks, nuns and priests that one should come to their aid and save them from their unchristian neighbors.; 10. The Tenth Confederate; New statutes concerning reform of the spiritual estate which Psittacus brought from the land of Wellfaria.; 11. The Eleventh Confederate
  • A new ordinance concerning the secular estate written in Wellfaria, as described by Psittacus. 12. The Twelfth Confederate; A friendly response of all God-fearing, decent, reasonable people in the German land to the pitiful complaint made to them by those in orders.; 13. The Thirteenth Confederate; A hopeful exhortation to the upright, honorable, strong, and Christian lords, officials, and subjects of the Common Confederacy (known as the Swiss) that they faithfully help to preserve evangelical teaching and devout Christians.; 14. The Fourteenth Confederate
  • Sir Erasmus of Rotterdam reveals in the book Encomion Morias the shameful service we render to the saints. 15. The Fifteenth Confederate; To each and every believer in Christ, a wholesome warning to guard against new, dangerous teachings.; Select Bibliography; Back cover
Control code
ocn890393167
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780227902899
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctt1cg7zd3
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)890393167

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