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The Resource The golden hind : an anthology of Elizabethan prose and poetry, selected & edited by Roy Lamson and Hallett Smith

The golden hind : an anthology of Elizabethan prose and poetry, selected & edited by Roy Lamson and Hallett Smith

Label
The golden hind : an anthology of Elizabethan prose and poetry
Title
The golden hind
Title remainder
an anthology of Elizabethan prose and poetry
Statement of responsibility
selected & edited by Roy Lamson and Hallett Smith
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
CIN
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
  • music
Index
no index present
LC call number
PR1125
LC item number
.L29 1942
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
  • 1908-1986
  • 1907-1996
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Lamson, Roy
  • Smith, Hallett
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • English literature
  • English literature
  • Anthologie
  • Literatur
  • Englisch
Label
The golden hind : an anthology of Elizabethan prose and poetry, selected & edited by Roy Lamson and Hallett Smith
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Whoso list to hunt, I know where is an hind
  • Sir Thomas Wyatt
  • Satires.
  • Mine own John Poins, since ye delight to know
  • Sir Thomas Wyatt
  • Songs.
  • Madame, withouten many words
  • My lute, awake! Perform the last
  • Blame not my lute, for he must sound
  • Forget not yet the tried intent
  • Elizabethan England.
  • A face that should content me wondrous well
  • And wilt thou leave me thus?
  • What should I say
  • Tagus, farewell, that westward with thy streams
  • They flee from me, that sometime did me seek
  • Tangled I was in love's snare
  • Sir Thomas Wyatt
  • Poetry. Sonnets.
  • The long love that in my thought doth harbor
  • Farewell, love, and all thy laws forever
  • I find no peace and all my war is done
  • My galley charged with forgetfulness
  • Like to these unmeasurable mountains
  • Divers doth use, as I have heard and know
  • Wyatt resteth here, that quick could never rest
  • Martial, the things for to attain
  • Give place, ye lovers, here before
  • So cruel prison how could betide, alas
  • London, has thou accused me
  • O happy dames, that may embrace
  • The fourth book of Virgil (selection)
  • Henry Howard
  • Poetry. Sonnets.
  • The soote season, that bud and bloom forth brings
  • Love, that doth reign and live within my thought
  • From Tuscan came my lady's worthy race
  • Alas! so all things now do hold their peace
  • Set me whereas the sun doth parch the green
  • Henry Howard
  • Miscellaneous poems.
  • Poetry.
  • The induction to the mirror for magistrates
  • Thomas Sackville
  • George Gascoigne
  • Poetry.
  • Amid my bale I bathe in bliss
  • Gascoigne's arraignment
  • Gascoigne's good-night
  • Gascoigne's lullaby
  • A libel of divorce
  • The steel glass (selection)
  • The grief of joy (selection)
  • VII
  • X
  • XI
  • XII
  • XIV
  • XV
  • XVIII
  • XXI
  • XXIII
  • XXIV
  • Poetry. Sonnets.
  • XXV
  • XXVI
  • XXVII
  • XXVIII
  • XXX
  • XXXI
  • XXXII
  • XXXIII
  • XXXVII
  • XXXIX
  • Astrophel and Stella.
  • XLI
  • XLV
  • XLVII
  • XLIX
  • L
  • LII
  • LIII
  • LIV
  • LVI
  • LVII
  • I
  • LVIII
  • LXII
  • LXIV
  • LXVI
  • LXVII
  • LXVIII
  • LXIX
  • LXX
  • LXXI
  • LXXII
  • II
  • LXXIII
  • LXXIV
  • LXXIX
  • LXXXIV
  • XC
  • XCII
  • XCIV
  • XCVI
  • XCVII
  • XCVIII
  • III
  • XCIX
  • CIII
  • CVII
  • Sir Philip Sidney
  • Songs.
  • Only joy, now here you are
  • Who is it that this dark night
  • The nightingale, as soon as April bringeth
  • Ring out your bells, let mourning shows be spread
  • Sir Philip Sidney
  • IV
  • Other sonnets.
  • Thou blind man's mark, thou fool's self-chosen snare
  • Leave me, O love which reaches but to dust
  • My true love hath my heart and I have his
  • Sir Philip Sidney
  • V
  • VI
  • IIII
  • XV
  • XVI
  • XIX
  • XXII
  • XXIII
  • XXVI
  • XXXIII
  • XXXIIII
  • XXXVII
  • Poetry.
  • LIIII
  • LXVII
  • LXVIII
  • LXIX
  • LXX
  • LXXV
  • LXXX
  • LXXXV
  • LXXXVI
  • LXXXVII
  • The shepherd's calendar.
  • Edmund Spenser
  • Epithalamion
  • An hymn in honor of beauty (selection)
  • Prothalamion
  • Edmund Spenser
  • April
  • August
  • October
  • Edmund Spenser
  • Amoretti.
  • I
  • Poetry. The passionate shepherd
  • Hero and Leander : Sestiad I, Sestiad II
  • Christopher Marlowe
  • Farewell, false love, the oracle of lies
  • Sir Walter Ralegh
  • Poetry.
  • Methought I saw the grave where Laura lay
  • The nymph's reply to the shepherd
  • What is our life? A play of passion
  • Like to a hermit poor in place obscure
  • Nature, that washed her hands in milk
  • The lie
  • The passionate man's pilgrimage
  • Poetry.
  • Diana.
  • Dear to my soul, then leave me not forsaken
  • Whilst echo cries, "what shall become of me?"
  • To live in hell and heaven to behold
  • Miracle of the world, I never will deny
  • He that for fear his master did deny
  • Henry Constable
  • Poetry.
  • Phillis.
  • Love guards the roses of thy lips
  • Devoid of reason, thrall to foolish ire
  • I would in rich and golden-colored rain
  • Thomas Lodge
  • Let others sing of knights and paladins
  • None other fame my unambitious muse
  • Samuel Daniel
  • Poetry.
  • Delia.
  • These plaintive verse, the posts of my desire
  • Fair is my love, and cruel as she's fair
  • If this be love, to draw a weary breath
  • Look, Delia, How we 'steem the half-blown rose
  • When men shall find thy flower, thy glory pass
  • Care-charmer sleep, son of the sable night
  • Whilst thus my pen strives to eternize thee
  • Since there's no help, come let us kiss and part
  • Michael Drayton
  • Poetry.
  • Idea.
  • Into these loves who but for passion looks
  • Like an adventurous seafarer am I
  • How many paltry, foolish, painted things
  • As other men, so I myself do muse
  • An evil spirit, your beauty, haunts me still
  • Dear, why should you command me to my rest
  • Poetry.
  • Licia.
  • Seven are the lights that wander in the skies
  • In time the strong and stately turrets fall
  • Like Memnon's rock, touched with the rising sun
  • Dr. Giles Fletcher
  • Poetry.
  • Parthenophil.
  • Jove for Europa's love took shape of bull
  • Ah, sweet content! where is thy mild abode
  • B. Barnes
  • Poetry.
  • Coelia.
  • It shall be said I died for Coelia
  • W. Percy
  • Poetry.
  • Zepheria. When we, in kind embracements, had agreed
  • Anonymous
  • Poetry.
  • Diella.
  • What sugared terms, what all-persuading art
  • R. Lynche
  • Poetry.
  • Chloris.
  • Colin, my dear and most entire beloved
  • W. Smith
  • Poetry.
  • Fidessa.
  • Care-charmer sleep, sweet ease in restless misery
  • Fly to her heart, hover about her heart
  • I have not spent the April of my time
  • B. Griffin
  • Poetry. Sonnet.
  • Words my well want, both ink and paper fail
  • H. Lok
  • The ousel cock so black of hue
  • Tell me where is fancy bred
  • Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more
  • Under the greenwood tree
  • Blow, blow, thou winter wind
  • It was a lover and his lass
  • Oh mistress mine! Where are you roaming?
  • Come away, come away, death
  • When that I was and-a little tiny boy
  • Take, oh take those lips away
  • Poetry.
  • How should I your true love know
  • Tomorrow is Saint Valentine's day
  • The poor soul sat sighing by a sycamore tree
  • He that has and-a little tiny wit
  • Come, thou monarch of the vine
  • Hark, hark! The lark at heaven's gate sings
  • Fear no more the heat o' the sun
  • When daffodils begin to peer
  • Lawn as white as driven snow
  • Will you buy any tape
  • Venus and Adonis (selection)
  • Jog on, jog on, the footpath way
  • Come unto these yellow sands
  • Full fathom five thy father lies
  • No more dams I'll make for fish
  • Where the bee sucks, there suck I
  • William Shakespeare
  • Sonnets.
  • II
  • V
  • XII
  • The rape of Lucrece (selection)
  • XV
  • XVIII
  • XX
  • XXI
  • XXIII
  • XXVI
  • XXVII
  • XXIX
  • XXX
  • XXXIII
  • William Shakespeare
  • XXXVIII
  • XLI
  • L
  • LIV
  • LV
  • LIX
  • LX
  • LXIII
  • LXIV
  • LXVI
  • Songs from the plays.
  • LXXI
  • LXXIII
  • LXXVI
  • LXXX
  • LXXXVI
  • XCIV
  • XCV
  • XCVIII
  • CIV
  • CVI
  • Who is Silvia? what is she
  • CVII
  • CX
  • CXVI
  • CXXVIII
  • CXXIX
  • CXXX
  • CXXXV
  • CXXXVIII
  • CXLIII
  • CXLIV
  • When daisies pied and violet blue
  • CXLVI
  • CXLVII
  • CLI
  • William Shakespeare
  • You spotted snakes with double tongue
  • Out of sight, out of mind
  • Barnabe Googe
  • If women could be fair and yet not fond
  • What cunning can express
  • Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford
  • Say that I should say I love ye
  • Phillida and Coridon
  • Pastoral
  • Nicholas Breton
  • My mind to me a kingdom is
  • Poetry.
  • Sir Edward Dyer
  • Upon the image of death
  • The burning babe
  • Robert Southwell
  • Tichborne's elegy
  • Chidiock Tichborne
  • The earth, late choked with showers
  • Thomas Lodge
  • Maesia's song
  • Sephestia's song to her child
  • When I was fair and young, and favor graced me
  • The shepherd's wife's song
  • Robert Greene
  • If music sweet and poetry agree
  • As it fell upon a day
  • Richard Barnfield
  • The doubt of future foes exiles my present joy
  • Queen Elizabeth
  • The aged lover renounceth love
  • Thomas, Lord Vaux
  • Amantium irae amoris redintegratio est
  • Richard Edwards
  • My love in her attire doth show her wit
  • Lyrics from song books.
  • Though amaryllis dance in green
  • Lulla, la lulla, lulla lullaby
  • Blow, shepherds, blow your pipes with gladsome glee resounding
  • Arise, get up, my dear love, rise, make haste, begone thee
  • April is in my mistress' face
  • Come away, come, sweet love! The golden morning breaks
  • Sleep, wayward thoughts, and rest you with my love
  • Weep you no more, sad fountains
  • Poetry. Anonymous lyrics.
  • A woman's looks
  • The soldier's song : I and III
  • The silver swan, who living had no note
  • Songs from plays.
  • Back and side go bare, go are
  • A song to the tune of Heart's ease
  • Lulla by baby, lulla by baby
  • Farewell, adieu, that courtly life
  • Lustily, lustily, lustily let us sail forth
  • Cupid and my Campaspe played
  • Fain would I have a pretty thing to give unto my lady
  • Pinch him, pinch him, black and blue
  • Fair and fair and twice so fair
  • His golden locks time hath to silver turned
  • What thing is love? For (well I wot) love is a thing
  • Spring, the sweet spring, is the year's pleasant king
  • Cold 's the wind, and wet's the rain
  • Golden slumbers kiss your eyes
  • Cast away care, he that loves sorrow
  • Call for the robin redbreast and the wren
  • A new courtly sonnet, of the Lady Greensleeves
  • As you came from the holy land of Walsingham
  • Phillida's love-call to her Corydon, and his replying
  • Crabbed age and youth
  • Phillida flouts me
  • Absence, hear thou my protestation
  • Poetry.
  • The complaint of Rosamund (selections)
  • Musophilus (selection)
  • Ulysses and the siren
  • A pastoral
  • Samuel Daniel
  • Poetry. Satires.
  • Book I satire III
  • Book I satire IV
  • Book V satire III
  • Joseph Hall
  • Poetry.
  • Scourge of villainy.
  • Satire VIII
  • John Marston
  • George Chapman
  • To young imaginaries in knowledge
  • George Chapman
  • Poetry.
  • Homer, Iliad.
  • Epistle dedicatory
  • Book I (selection)
  • Book III (selection)
  • Book VI (selection)
  • Book XVIII (selection)
  • Book XII (selection)
  • To the Virginian voyage
  • To the Cambro-Britons
  • To his rival
  • Michael Drayton
  • Poly-Obion.
  • The thirteenth song (selection)
  • Michael Drayton
  • Poetry.
  • Idea, the shepherd's garland.
  • Eighth eclogue
  • Michael Drayton
  • England 's Heroical epistles.
  • Surrey to Geraldine
  • Michael Drayton
  • Odes.
  • Rose-cheeked Laura, come
  • To music bent is my retired mind
  • Jack and Joan they think no ill
  • Give beauty all her right
  • Never love unless you can
  • There is a garden in her face
  • Fain would I wed a fair young man that night and day could please me
  • Thomas Campion
  • Poetry.
  • What if a day, or a month, or a year
  • My sweetest Lesbia, let us live and love
  • When to her lute Corinna sings
  • Follow your saint, follow with accents sweet
  • Thou art not fair for all thy red and white
  • The man of life upright
  • When thou must home to shades of underground
  • John Foxe
  • The palace of pleasure.
  • Romeo and Julietta (selection)
  • William Painter
  • A petite palace.
  • Pygmalion (selection)
  • George Pettie
  • The schoolmaster.
  • A preface to the reader
  • Book I
  • Prose.
  • Roger Ascham
  • The chronicle (selection)
  • Raphael Holinshed
  • Euphues, the anatomy of wit (selection)
  • Euphues and his England (selection)
  • Euphues' glass for Europe (selection)
  • John Lyly
  • The school of abuse (selection)
  • Stephen Gosson
  • An apology for poetry
  • The courtier.
  • Arcadia (selection)
  • Sir Philip Sidney
  • Plutarch's lives.
  • Julius Caesar (selection)
  • Mark Antony (selection)
  • Sir Thomas North
  • Rosalynde (abridged)
  • Thomas Lodge
  • A notable discovery of Cozenage (selection)
  • A groatsworth of wit (selection)
  • Bembo's discourse
  • The repentance of Robert Greene (selection)
  • Robert Greene
  • Four letters.
  • The second letter (selection)
  • The third letter (selection)
  • Gabriel Harvey
  • Against malcontent writers
  • Gabriel Harvey
  • Pierce Penniless.
  • An invective against enemies of poetry
  • Sir Thomas Hoby
  • Of sloth, and the value of plays
  • Thomas Nashe
  • Strange news.
  • On Spenser
  • Harvey's inkhorn terms
  • Nashe on Nashe
  • Thomas Nashe
  • The unfortunate traveller.
  • The sweating sickness
  • Surrey and his Geraldine
  • Book of martyrs.
  • An Italian revenge
  • Thomas Nashe
  • Voyages.
  • Anthony Jenkinson (selection)
  • Sir Humphrey Gilbert (selection)
  • Thomas Hariot (selection)
  • Sir Francis Drake (selection)
  • Richard Hakluyt
  • The last fight of the Revenge
  • The discovery of Guiana (selection)
  • St. Laurence
  • Sir Walter Ralegh
  • The gentle craft (selection)
  • Thomas Deloney
  • The gull's hornbook (selection)
  • Thomas Dekker
  • The wonderful year.
  • The sickness and death of Queen Elizabeth
  • Thomas Dekker
  • Lady Jane Grey
  • Ridley and Latimer
Control code
476500
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xvii, 846 pages
Lccn
42021319
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps, music, tables
System control number
(OCoLC)476500
Label
The golden hind : an anthology of Elizabethan prose and poetry, selected & edited by Roy Lamson and Hallett Smith
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Whoso list to hunt, I know where is an hind
  • Sir Thomas Wyatt
  • Satires.
  • Mine own John Poins, since ye delight to know
  • Sir Thomas Wyatt
  • Songs.
  • Madame, withouten many words
  • My lute, awake! Perform the last
  • Blame not my lute, for he must sound
  • Forget not yet the tried intent
  • Elizabethan England.
  • A face that should content me wondrous well
  • And wilt thou leave me thus?
  • What should I say
  • Tagus, farewell, that westward with thy streams
  • They flee from me, that sometime did me seek
  • Tangled I was in love's snare
  • Sir Thomas Wyatt
  • Poetry. Sonnets.
  • The long love that in my thought doth harbor
  • Farewell, love, and all thy laws forever
  • I find no peace and all my war is done
  • My galley charged with forgetfulness
  • Like to these unmeasurable mountains
  • Divers doth use, as I have heard and know
  • Wyatt resteth here, that quick could never rest
  • Martial, the things for to attain
  • Give place, ye lovers, here before
  • So cruel prison how could betide, alas
  • London, has thou accused me
  • O happy dames, that may embrace
  • The fourth book of Virgil (selection)
  • Henry Howard
  • Poetry. Sonnets.
  • The soote season, that bud and bloom forth brings
  • Love, that doth reign and live within my thought
  • From Tuscan came my lady's worthy race
  • Alas! so all things now do hold their peace
  • Set me whereas the sun doth parch the green
  • Henry Howard
  • Miscellaneous poems.
  • Poetry.
  • The induction to the mirror for magistrates
  • Thomas Sackville
  • George Gascoigne
  • Poetry.
  • Amid my bale I bathe in bliss
  • Gascoigne's arraignment
  • Gascoigne's good-night
  • Gascoigne's lullaby
  • A libel of divorce
  • The steel glass (selection)
  • The grief of joy (selection)
  • VII
  • X
  • XI
  • XII
  • XIV
  • XV
  • XVIII
  • XXI
  • XXIII
  • XXIV
  • Poetry. Sonnets.
  • XXV
  • XXVI
  • XXVII
  • XXVIII
  • XXX
  • XXXI
  • XXXII
  • XXXIII
  • XXXVII
  • XXXIX
  • Astrophel and Stella.
  • XLI
  • XLV
  • XLVII
  • XLIX
  • L
  • LII
  • LIII
  • LIV
  • LVI
  • LVII
  • I
  • LVIII
  • LXII
  • LXIV
  • LXVI
  • LXVII
  • LXVIII
  • LXIX
  • LXX
  • LXXI
  • LXXII
  • II
  • LXXIII
  • LXXIV
  • LXXIX
  • LXXXIV
  • XC
  • XCII
  • XCIV
  • XCVI
  • XCVII
  • XCVIII
  • III
  • XCIX
  • CIII
  • CVII
  • Sir Philip Sidney
  • Songs.
  • Only joy, now here you are
  • Who is it that this dark night
  • The nightingale, as soon as April bringeth
  • Ring out your bells, let mourning shows be spread
  • Sir Philip Sidney
  • IV
  • Other sonnets.
  • Thou blind man's mark, thou fool's self-chosen snare
  • Leave me, O love which reaches but to dust
  • My true love hath my heart and I have his
  • Sir Philip Sidney
  • V
  • VI
  • IIII
  • XV
  • XVI
  • XIX
  • XXII
  • XXIII
  • XXVI
  • XXXIII
  • XXXIIII
  • XXXVII
  • Poetry.
  • LIIII
  • LXVII
  • LXVIII
  • LXIX
  • LXX
  • LXXV
  • LXXX
  • LXXXV
  • LXXXVI
  • LXXXVII
  • The shepherd's calendar.
  • Edmund Spenser
  • Epithalamion
  • An hymn in honor of beauty (selection)
  • Prothalamion
  • Edmund Spenser
  • April
  • August
  • October
  • Edmund Spenser
  • Amoretti.
  • I
  • Poetry. The passionate shepherd
  • Hero and Leander : Sestiad I, Sestiad II
  • Christopher Marlowe
  • Farewell, false love, the oracle of lies
  • Sir Walter Ralegh
  • Poetry.
  • Methought I saw the grave where Laura lay
  • The nymph's reply to the shepherd
  • What is our life? A play of passion
  • Like to a hermit poor in place obscure
  • Nature, that washed her hands in milk
  • The lie
  • The passionate man's pilgrimage
  • Poetry.
  • Diana.
  • Dear to my soul, then leave me not forsaken
  • Whilst echo cries, "what shall become of me?"
  • To live in hell and heaven to behold
  • Miracle of the world, I never will deny
  • He that for fear his master did deny
  • Henry Constable
  • Poetry.
  • Phillis.
  • Love guards the roses of thy lips
  • Devoid of reason, thrall to foolish ire
  • I would in rich and golden-colored rain
  • Thomas Lodge
  • Let others sing of knights and paladins
  • None other fame my unambitious muse
  • Samuel Daniel
  • Poetry.
  • Delia.
  • These plaintive verse, the posts of my desire
  • Fair is my love, and cruel as she's fair
  • If this be love, to draw a weary breath
  • Look, Delia, How we 'steem the half-blown rose
  • When men shall find thy flower, thy glory pass
  • Care-charmer sleep, son of the sable night
  • Whilst thus my pen strives to eternize thee
  • Since there's no help, come let us kiss and part
  • Michael Drayton
  • Poetry.
  • Idea.
  • Into these loves who but for passion looks
  • Like an adventurous seafarer am I
  • How many paltry, foolish, painted things
  • As other men, so I myself do muse
  • An evil spirit, your beauty, haunts me still
  • Dear, why should you command me to my rest
  • Poetry.
  • Licia.
  • Seven are the lights that wander in the skies
  • In time the strong and stately turrets fall
  • Like Memnon's rock, touched with the rising sun
  • Dr. Giles Fletcher
  • Poetry.
  • Parthenophil.
  • Jove for Europa's love took shape of bull
  • Ah, sweet content! where is thy mild abode
  • B. Barnes
  • Poetry.
  • Coelia.
  • It shall be said I died for Coelia
  • W. Percy
  • Poetry.
  • Zepheria. When we, in kind embracements, had agreed
  • Anonymous
  • Poetry.
  • Diella.
  • What sugared terms, what all-persuading art
  • R. Lynche
  • Poetry.
  • Chloris.
  • Colin, my dear and most entire beloved
  • W. Smith
  • Poetry.
  • Fidessa.
  • Care-charmer sleep, sweet ease in restless misery
  • Fly to her heart, hover about her heart
  • I have not spent the April of my time
  • B. Griffin
  • Poetry. Sonnet.
  • Words my well want, both ink and paper fail
  • H. Lok
  • The ousel cock so black of hue
  • Tell me where is fancy bred
  • Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more
  • Under the greenwood tree
  • Blow, blow, thou winter wind
  • It was a lover and his lass
  • Oh mistress mine! Where are you roaming?
  • Come away, come away, death
  • When that I was and-a little tiny boy
  • Take, oh take those lips away
  • Poetry.
  • How should I your true love know
  • Tomorrow is Saint Valentine's day
  • The poor soul sat sighing by a sycamore tree
  • He that has and-a little tiny wit
  • Come, thou monarch of the vine
  • Hark, hark! The lark at heaven's gate sings
  • Fear no more the heat o' the sun
  • When daffodils begin to peer
  • Lawn as white as driven snow
  • Will you buy any tape
  • Venus and Adonis (selection)
  • Jog on, jog on, the footpath way
  • Come unto these yellow sands
  • Full fathom five thy father lies
  • No more dams I'll make for fish
  • Where the bee sucks, there suck I
  • William Shakespeare
  • Sonnets.
  • II
  • V
  • XII
  • The rape of Lucrece (selection)
  • XV
  • XVIII
  • XX
  • XXI
  • XXIII
  • XXVI
  • XXVII
  • XXIX
  • XXX
  • XXXIII
  • William Shakespeare
  • XXXVIII
  • XLI
  • L
  • LIV
  • LV
  • LIX
  • LX
  • LXIII
  • LXIV
  • LXVI
  • Songs from the plays.
  • LXXI
  • LXXIII
  • LXXVI
  • LXXX
  • LXXXVI
  • XCIV
  • XCV
  • XCVIII
  • CIV
  • CVI
  • Who is Silvia? what is she
  • CVII
  • CX
  • CXVI
  • CXXVIII
  • CXXIX
  • CXXX
  • CXXXV
  • CXXXVIII
  • CXLIII
  • CXLIV
  • When daisies pied and violet blue
  • CXLVI
  • CXLVII
  • CLI
  • William Shakespeare
  • You spotted snakes with double tongue
  • Out of sight, out of mind
  • Barnabe Googe
  • If women could be fair and yet not fond
  • What cunning can express
  • Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford
  • Say that I should say I love ye
  • Phillida and Coridon
  • Pastoral
  • Nicholas Breton
  • My mind to me a kingdom is
  • Poetry.
  • Sir Edward Dyer
  • Upon the image of death
  • The burning babe
  • Robert Southwell
  • Tichborne's elegy
  • Chidiock Tichborne
  • The earth, late choked with showers
  • Thomas Lodge
  • Maesia's song
  • Sephestia's song to her child
  • When I was fair and young, and favor graced me
  • The shepherd's wife's song
  • Robert Greene
  • If music sweet and poetry agree
  • As it fell upon a day
  • Richard Barnfield
  • The doubt of future foes exiles my present joy
  • Queen Elizabeth
  • The aged lover renounceth love
  • Thomas, Lord Vaux
  • Amantium irae amoris redintegratio est
  • Richard Edwards
  • My love in her attire doth show her wit
  • Lyrics from song books.
  • Though amaryllis dance in green
  • Lulla, la lulla, lulla lullaby
  • Blow, shepherds, blow your pipes with gladsome glee resounding
  • Arise, get up, my dear love, rise, make haste, begone thee
  • April is in my mistress' face
  • Come away, come, sweet love! The golden morning breaks
  • Sleep, wayward thoughts, and rest you with my love
  • Weep you no more, sad fountains
  • Poetry. Anonymous lyrics.
  • A woman's looks
  • The soldier's song : I and III
  • The silver swan, who living had no note
  • Songs from plays.
  • Back and side go bare, go are
  • A song to the tune of Heart's ease
  • Lulla by baby, lulla by baby
  • Farewell, adieu, that courtly life
  • Lustily, lustily, lustily let us sail forth
  • Cupid and my Campaspe played
  • Fain would I have a pretty thing to give unto my lady
  • Pinch him, pinch him, black and blue
  • Fair and fair and twice so fair
  • His golden locks time hath to silver turned
  • What thing is love? For (well I wot) love is a thing
  • Spring, the sweet spring, is the year's pleasant king
  • Cold 's the wind, and wet's the rain
  • Golden slumbers kiss your eyes
  • Cast away care, he that loves sorrow
  • Call for the robin redbreast and the wren
  • A new courtly sonnet, of the Lady Greensleeves
  • As you came from the holy land of Walsingham
  • Phillida's love-call to her Corydon, and his replying
  • Crabbed age and youth
  • Phillida flouts me
  • Absence, hear thou my protestation
  • Poetry.
  • The complaint of Rosamund (selections)
  • Musophilus (selection)
  • Ulysses and the siren
  • A pastoral
  • Samuel Daniel
  • Poetry. Satires.
  • Book I satire III
  • Book I satire IV
  • Book V satire III
  • Joseph Hall
  • Poetry.
  • Scourge of villainy.
  • Satire VIII
  • John Marston
  • George Chapman
  • To young imaginaries in knowledge
  • George Chapman
  • Poetry.
  • Homer, Iliad.
  • Epistle dedicatory
  • Book I (selection)
  • Book III (selection)
  • Book VI (selection)
  • Book XVIII (selection)
  • Book XII (selection)
  • To the Virginian voyage
  • To the Cambro-Britons
  • To his rival
  • Michael Drayton
  • Poly-Obion.
  • The thirteenth song (selection)
  • Michael Drayton
  • Poetry.
  • Idea, the shepherd's garland.
  • Eighth eclogue
  • Michael Drayton
  • England 's Heroical epistles.
  • Surrey to Geraldine
  • Michael Drayton
  • Odes.
  • Rose-cheeked Laura, come
  • To music bent is my retired mind
  • Jack and Joan they think no ill
  • Give beauty all her right
  • Never love unless you can
  • There is a garden in her face
  • Fain would I wed a fair young man that night and day could please me
  • Thomas Campion
  • Poetry.
  • What if a day, or a month, or a year
  • My sweetest Lesbia, let us live and love
  • When to her lute Corinna sings
  • Follow your saint, follow with accents sweet
  • Thou art not fair for all thy red and white
  • The man of life upright
  • When thou must home to shades of underground
  • John Foxe
  • The palace of pleasure.
  • Romeo and Julietta (selection)
  • William Painter
  • A petite palace.
  • Pygmalion (selection)
  • George Pettie
  • The schoolmaster.
  • A preface to the reader
  • Book I
  • Prose.
  • Roger Ascham
  • The chronicle (selection)
  • Raphael Holinshed
  • Euphues, the anatomy of wit (selection)
  • Euphues and his England (selection)
  • Euphues' glass for Europe (selection)
  • John Lyly
  • The school of abuse (selection)
  • Stephen Gosson
  • An apology for poetry
  • The courtier.
  • Arcadia (selection)
  • Sir Philip Sidney
  • Plutarch's lives.
  • Julius Caesar (selection)
  • Mark Antony (selection)
  • Sir Thomas North
  • Rosalynde (abridged)
  • Thomas Lodge
  • A notable discovery of Cozenage (selection)
  • A groatsworth of wit (selection)
  • Bembo's discourse
  • The repentance of Robert Greene (selection)
  • Robert Greene
  • Four letters.
  • The second letter (selection)
  • The third letter (selection)
  • Gabriel Harvey
  • Against malcontent writers
  • Gabriel Harvey
  • Pierce Penniless.
  • An invective against enemies of poetry
  • Sir Thomas Hoby
  • Of sloth, and the value of plays
  • Thomas Nashe
  • Strange news.
  • On Spenser
  • Harvey's inkhorn terms
  • Nashe on Nashe
  • Thomas Nashe
  • The unfortunate traveller.
  • The sweating sickness
  • Surrey and his Geraldine
  • Book of martyrs.
  • An Italian revenge
  • Thomas Nashe
  • Voyages.
  • Anthony Jenkinson (selection)
  • Sir Humphrey Gilbert (selection)
  • Thomas Hariot (selection)
  • Sir Francis Drake (selection)
  • Richard Hakluyt
  • The last fight of the Revenge
  • The discovery of Guiana (selection)
  • St. Laurence
  • Sir Walter Ralegh
  • The gentle craft (selection)
  • Thomas Deloney
  • The gull's hornbook (selection)
  • Thomas Dekker
  • The wonderful year.
  • The sickness and death of Queen Elizabeth
  • Thomas Dekker
  • Lady Jane Grey
  • Ridley and Latimer
Control code
476500
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xvii, 846 pages
Lccn
42021319
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps, music, tables
System control number
(OCoLC)476500

Library Locations

    • Copley LibraryBorrow it
      5998 Alcalá Park, San Diego, CA, 92110-2492, US
      32.771354 -117.193327
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