Coverart for item
The Resource The long thaw : how humans are changing the next 100,000 years of Earth's climate, David Archer ; with a new preface by the author

The long thaw : how humans are changing the next 100,000 years of Earth's climate, David Archer ; with a new preface by the author

Label
The long thaw : how humans are changing the next 100,000 years of Earth's climate
Title
The long thaw
Title remainder
how humans are changing the next 100,000 years of Earth's climate
Statement of responsibility
David Archer ; with a new preface by the author
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
The human impact on Earth's climate is often treated as a hundred-year issue lasting as far into the future as 2100, the year in which most climate projections cease. In The Long Thaw, David Archer, one of the world's leading climatologists, reveals the hard truth that these changes in climate will be "locked in," essentially forever. If you think that global warming means slightly hotter weather and a modest rise in sea levels that will persist only so long as fossil fuels hold out (or until we decide to stop burning them), think again. In The Long Thaw, David Archer predicts that if we continue to emit carbon dioxide we may eventually cancel the next ice age and raise the oceans by 50 meters. A human-driven, planet-wide thaw has already begun, and will continue to impact Earth's climate and sea level for hundreds of thousands of years. The great ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland may take more than a century to melt, and the overall change in sea level will be one hundred times what is forecast for 2100. By comparing the global warming projection for the next century to natural climate changes of the distant past, and then looking into the future far beyond the usual scientific and political horizon of the year 2100, Archer reveals the hard truths of the long-term climate forecast. Archer shows how just a few centuries of fossil-fuel use will cause not only a climate storm that will last a few hundred years, but dramatic climate changes that will last thousands. Carbon dioxide emitted today will be a problem for millennia. For the first time, humans have become major players in shaping the long-term climate. In fact, a planetwide thaw driven by humans has already begun. But despite the seriousness of the situation, Archer argues that it is still not too late to avert dangerous climate change--if humans can find a way to cooperate as never before. Revealing why carbon dioxide may be an even worse gamble in
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1960-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Archer, David
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Science essentials
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Global warming
  • Climatic changes
  • Climatic changes
  • Global warming
  • Paleoclimatology
  • BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
  • SOCIAL SCIENCE
  • Climatic changes
  • Climatic changes
  • Global warming
  • Global warming
  • Paleoclimatology
  • SCIENCE
Label
The long thaw : how humans are changing the next 100,000 years of Earth's climate, David Archer ; with a new preface by the author
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Prologue. Global warming in geologic time -- section 1. The present. The greenhouse effect ; We've seen it with our own eyes ; Forecast of the century -- section 2. The past. Millennial climate cycles ; Glacial climate cycles ; Geologic climate cycles ; The present in the bosom of the past -- section 3. The future. The fate of fossil fuel CO2 ; Acidifying the ocean ; Carbon cycle feedbacks ; Sea level in the deep future ; Orbits, CO2, and the next Ice Age -- Epilogue. Carbon economics and ethics
Control code
ocn936204514
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781400880775
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
Other physical details
illustrations, map
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
  • 3665df58-eaaa-4232-a362-916870a288e2
  • 22573/ctvcsg96g
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)936204514
Label
The long thaw : how humans are changing the next 100,000 years of Earth's climate, David Archer ; with a new preface by the author
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Prologue. Global warming in geologic time -- section 1. The present. The greenhouse effect ; We've seen it with our own eyes ; Forecast of the century -- section 2. The past. Millennial climate cycles ; Glacial climate cycles ; Geologic climate cycles ; The present in the bosom of the past -- section 3. The future. The fate of fossil fuel CO2 ; Acidifying the ocean ; Carbon cycle feedbacks ; Sea level in the deep future ; Orbits, CO2, and the next Ice Age -- Epilogue. Carbon economics and ethics
Control code
ocn936204514
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781400880775
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
Other physical details
illustrations, map
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
  • 3665df58-eaaa-4232-a362-916870a288e2
  • 22573/ctvcsg96g
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)936204514

Library Locations

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      5998 Alcalá Park, San Diego, CA, 92110-2492, US
      32.771354 -117.193327
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