Coverart for item
The Resource The myth of the addicted army : Vietnam and the modern war on drugs, Jeremy Kuzmarov

The myth of the addicted army : Vietnam and the modern war on drugs, Jeremy Kuzmarov

Label
The myth of the addicted army : Vietnam and the modern war on drugs
Title
The myth of the addicted army
Title remainder
Vietnam and the modern war on drugs
Statement of responsibility
Jeremy Kuzmarov
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
This work is an analysis of the links between the Vietnam War and the evolution of American drug policy. The image of the drug addicted American soldier, disheveled, glassy eyed, his uniform adorned with slogans of antiwar dissent, has long been associated with the Vietnam War. More specifically, it has persisted as an explanation for the U.S. defeat, the symbol of a demoralized army incapable of carrying out its military mission. Yet as the author documents in this book, popular assumptions about drug use in Vietnam are based more on myth than fact. Not only was alcohol the intoxicant of choice for most GIs, but the prevalence of other drugs varied enormously. Although marijuana use among troops increased over the course of the war, for the most part it remained confined to rear areas, and the use of highly addictive drugs like heroin was never as widespread as many imagined. Like other cultural myths that emerged from the war, the concept of an addicted army was first advanced by war hawks seeking a scapegoat for the failure of U.S. policies in Vietnam, in this case one that could be linked to permissive liberal social policies and the excesses of the counterculture. But conservatives were not alone. Ironically, the author shows, elements of the antiwar movement also promoted the myth, largely because of a presumed alliance between Asian drug traffickers and the Central Intelligence Agency. While this claim was not without foundation, as new archival evidence confirms, the left exaggerated the scope of addiction for its own political purposes. Exploiting bipartisan concern over the perceived drug crisis, the Nixon administration in the early 1970s launched a bold new program of federal antidrug measures, especially in the international realm. Initially, the War on Drugs helped divert attention away from the failed quest for peace with honor in Southeast Asia. But once institutionalized, it continued to influence political discourse as well as U.S. drug policy in the decades that followed
Member of
Cataloging source
CN8ML
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1979-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Kuzmarov, Jeremy
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Vietnam War (1961-1975)
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975
  • Drug abuse
  • Drug control
  • Soldiers
  • Soldiers
  • SOCIAL SCIENCE
  • Drug abuse
  • Drug control
  • Social aspects
  • Soldiers
  • United States
  • Vietnam
  • Drogenbekämpfung
  • Soldat
  • Drogenkonsum
  • Vietnamkrieg
  • USA
  • Substance-Related Disorders
  • Military Personnel
  • Drug and Narcotic Control
  • Vietnam Conflict
  • History, 20th Century
  • United States
Label
The myth of the addicted army : Vietnam and the modern war on drugs, Jeremy Kuzmarov
Instantiates
Publication
Note
OldControl:muse9781613761182
Antecedent source
not applicable
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 247-285) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction : the politics of scapegoating -- "The press has done a tremendous disservice" : historical perspective -- Creating the myth of the "Nam junkie" : mass media and the rise of a drug scare -- Deconstructing the myth : the great national drug debate of the sixties and seventies -- "A generation of junkies" : the antiwar movement, the Democratic Party, and the myth -- The brass responds, part I : Nixon's war on drugs -- The brass responds, part II : from counterinsurgency to narco-insurgency in Southeast Asia -- "Get up you doped up bastard!" : the myth in Hollywood and popular television -- The crackdown : the Reagan revolution and the war on drugs -- The myth endures
Control code
ocn794701598
Extent
1 online resource (xii, 303 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781613761182
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
not applicable
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)794701598
Label
The myth of the addicted army : Vietnam and the modern war on drugs, Jeremy Kuzmarov
Publication
Note
OldControl:muse9781613761182
Antecedent source
not applicable
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 247-285) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction : the politics of scapegoating -- "The press has done a tremendous disservice" : historical perspective -- Creating the myth of the "Nam junkie" : mass media and the rise of a drug scare -- Deconstructing the myth : the great national drug debate of the sixties and seventies -- "A generation of junkies" : the antiwar movement, the Democratic Party, and the myth -- The brass responds, part I : Nixon's war on drugs -- The brass responds, part II : from counterinsurgency to narco-insurgency in Southeast Asia -- "Get up you doped up bastard!" : the myth in Hollywood and popular television -- The crackdown : the Reagan revolution and the war on drugs -- The myth endures
Control code
ocn794701598
Extent
1 online resource (xii, 303 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781613761182
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
not applicable
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)794701598

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