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The Resource The scary Mason-Dixon Line : African American writers and the South, Trudier Harris

The scary Mason-Dixon Line : African American writers and the South, Trudier Harris

Label
The scary Mason-Dixon Line : African American writers and the South
Title
The scary Mason-Dixon Line
Title remainder
African American writers and the South
Statement of responsibility
Trudier Harris
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Harris, Trudier
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Index
index present
LC call number
PS153.N5
LC item number
H293 2009
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
Southern literary studies
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • American literature
  • Southern States
  • African Americans in literature
  • Fear in literature
  • Slavery
  • Racism
  • African Americans
  • African Americans
  • Literature and history
Label
The scary Mason-Dixon Line : African American writers and the South, Trudier Harris
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 225-233) and index
Contents
Introduction : Southern black writers no matter where they are born -- Such a frightening musical form : James Baldwin's Blues for Mister Charlie (1964) -- Fear of manhood in the wake of systemic racism in Ernest J. Gaines's "Three men" (1968) -- The irresistible appeal of slavery : fear of losing the self in Octavia E. Butler's Kindred (1979) -- Owning the script, owning the self : transcendence of fear in Sherley Anne Williams's Dessa Rose (1986) -- 10,000 miles from Dixie and still in the South : fear of transplanted racism in Yusef Komunyakaa's Vietnam poetry : Dien cai dau (1988) -- Fear of family, Christianity, and the self : Southern black "othering" in Randall Kenan's A visitation of spirits (1989) -- A haunting diary and a slasher quilt : using dynamic folk communities to combat terror in Phyllis Alesia Perry's Stigmata (1998) -- Domesticating fear : Tayari Jones's mission in Leaving Atlanta (2002) -- The worst fear imaginable : black slave owners in Edward P. Jones's The known world (2003) -- No fear; or, autoerotic creativity : how Raymond Andrews pleasures himself in Baby Sweet's (1983)
Control code
234257235
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
xi, 247 p.
Isbn
9780801833953
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2008031341
System control number
(OCoLC)234257235
Label
The scary Mason-Dixon Line : African American writers and the South, Trudier Harris
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 225-233) and index
Contents
Introduction : Southern black writers no matter where they are born -- Such a frightening musical form : James Baldwin's Blues for Mister Charlie (1964) -- Fear of manhood in the wake of systemic racism in Ernest J. Gaines's "Three men" (1968) -- The irresistible appeal of slavery : fear of losing the self in Octavia E. Butler's Kindred (1979) -- Owning the script, owning the self : transcendence of fear in Sherley Anne Williams's Dessa Rose (1986) -- 10,000 miles from Dixie and still in the South : fear of transplanted racism in Yusef Komunyakaa's Vietnam poetry : Dien cai dau (1988) -- Fear of family, Christianity, and the self : Southern black "othering" in Randall Kenan's A visitation of spirits (1989) -- A haunting diary and a slasher quilt : using dynamic folk communities to combat terror in Phyllis Alesia Perry's Stigmata (1998) -- Domesticating fear : Tayari Jones's mission in Leaving Atlanta (2002) -- The worst fear imaginable : black slave owners in Edward P. Jones's The known world (2003) -- No fear; or, autoerotic creativity : how Raymond Andrews pleasures himself in Baby Sweet's (1983)
Control code
234257235
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
xi, 247 p.
Isbn
9780801833953
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2008031341
System control number
(OCoLC)234257235

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