Coverart for item
The Resource The science of the soul : the commentary tradition on Aristotle's De anima, c. 1260-c. 1360, sander W. de Boer

The science of the soul : the commentary tradition on Aristotle's De anima, c. 1260-c. 1360, sander W. de Boer

Label
The science of the soul : the commentary tradition on Aristotle's De anima, c. 1260-c. 1360
Title
The science of the soul
Title remainder
the commentary tradition on Aristotle's De anima, c. 1260-c. 1360
Statement of responsibility
sander W. de Boer
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
The transformation of the science of the soul between 1260 and 1360Aristotle''s highly influential work on the soul, entitled De anima, formed part of the core curriculum of medieval universities and was discussed intensively. It covers a range of topics in philosophical psychology, such as the relationship between mind and body and the nature of abstract thought. However, there is a key difference in scope between the socalled 'science of the soul'', based on Aristotle, and modern philosophical psychology. This book starts from a basic premise accepted by all medieval commentators, namely that
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Boer, Sander Wopke de
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Ancient and Medieval Philosophy - Series 1
Series volume
46
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Aristotle
  • Psychology
  • Philosophy of mind
  • Soul
  • PHILOSOPHY
  • PHILOSOPHY
  • PHILOSOPHY
  • Philosophy of mind
  • Psychology
  • Soul
Label
The science of the soul : the commentary tradition on Aristotle's De anima, c. 1260-c. 1360, sander W. de Boer
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Note
Revision of the author's thesis (ph. D.), Radboud University Nijmegen
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and indexes
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • The soul as perfectio
  • Avicenna's influence
  • The soul as forma
  • Immortal but not personal : radical Aristotelianism
  • Formality and subsistence combined : Thomas Aquinas
  • A substance, but also a form
  • Unicity versus plurality of substantial form
  • Methodological discussions
  • The scientific Status of the scientia de anima
  • Imperceptibility
  • Introduction
  • Simplicity
  • Potentiality
  • The study of the soul within natural philosophy
  • Radulphus Brito against John of Jandun
  • An increasing focus on the intellect
  • The subject matter of the scientia de anima
  • The soul as subject matter
  • The ensouled body sub ratione anirnae as subject matter
  • Leaving the subject matter undecided
  • Summary
  • Subject matter
  • The epistemic Status of the scientia de anima
  • Unproblematic beginnings : Thomas Aquinas
  • Certitude and nobility combined : Anonymus Van Steenberghen and Walter Burley
  • Increasing difficulties : Anonymus Bazán, Radulphus Brito and John of Jandun
  • The final stages : John Buridan and Nicole Oresme
  • Conclusions
  • The aristotelian definition of the soul
  • Aristotle's definition of the soul
  • Thomas Aquinas's views on the matter of the soul
  • The Anonymi
  • Status quaestionis
  • Fourteenth-century interpretations
  • The substantiality of the soul
  • The actuality of the body
  • Can we perceive the identity of accidents?
  • Thomas Aquinas
  • Radulphus Brito
  • John of Jandun
  • John Buridan
  • Excursus : condemnations and polemics
  • Conclusions
  • Periodisation and sources
  • Substance, powers and acts
  • A curious fourteenth-century thought experiment
  • One soul or multiple souls?
  • John Buridan's arguments against a plurality of souls
  • Nicole Oresme's hesitation
  • Summary
  • The relation between the soul and its powers
  • Arguments against a real distinction
  • Arguments in favor of a real distinction
  • Some preliminary conclusions
  • A chronological list of consulted commentaries
  • The identification of the soul with its powers
  • The soul's presence in the body
  • From annulose to perfect animals
  • Is the soul extended or not?
  • The discussion of the soul's presence after Ockham
  • Is the power of sight really present in the foot?
  • From annulose animals to perfect animals
  • From animal soul to human soul
  • The intellective soul : material or immaterial?
  • Epilogue and conclusions
  • Orthography, punctuation and translations
  • The fragile unity of the science of the soul
  • Final conclusions
  • Bibliography
  • Manuscripts
  • Published sources
  • Secondary literature
  • Index Codicum Manuscriptorum
  • Index Nominum
  • Overview
  • The introduction of the De anima into the Latin West
Control code
ocn840613601
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789461660787
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctt8xnfgc
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)840613601
Label
The science of the soul : the commentary tradition on Aristotle's De anima, c. 1260-c. 1360, sander W. de Boer
Publication
Copyright
Note
Revision of the author's thesis (ph. D.), Radboud University Nijmegen
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and indexes
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • The soul as perfectio
  • Avicenna's influence
  • The soul as forma
  • Immortal but not personal : radical Aristotelianism
  • Formality and subsistence combined : Thomas Aquinas
  • A substance, but also a form
  • Unicity versus plurality of substantial form
  • Methodological discussions
  • The scientific Status of the scientia de anima
  • Imperceptibility
  • Introduction
  • Simplicity
  • Potentiality
  • The study of the soul within natural philosophy
  • Radulphus Brito against John of Jandun
  • An increasing focus on the intellect
  • The subject matter of the scientia de anima
  • The soul as subject matter
  • The ensouled body sub ratione anirnae as subject matter
  • Leaving the subject matter undecided
  • Summary
  • Subject matter
  • The epistemic Status of the scientia de anima
  • Unproblematic beginnings : Thomas Aquinas
  • Certitude and nobility combined : Anonymus Van Steenberghen and Walter Burley
  • Increasing difficulties : Anonymus Bazán, Radulphus Brito and John of Jandun
  • The final stages : John Buridan and Nicole Oresme
  • Conclusions
  • The aristotelian definition of the soul
  • Aristotle's definition of the soul
  • Thomas Aquinas's views on the matter of the soul
  • The Anonymi
  • Status quaestionis
  • Fourteenth-century interpretations
  • The substantiality of the soul
  • The actuality of the body
  • Can we perceive the identity of accidents?
  • Thomas Aquinas
  • Radulphus Brito
  • John of Jandun
  • John Buridan
  • Excursus : condemnations and polemics
  • Conclusions
  • Periodisation and sources
  • Substance, powers and acts
  • A curious fourteenth-century thought experiment
  • One soul or multiple souls?
  • John Buridan's arguments against a plurality of souls
  • Nicole Oresme's hesitation
  • Summary
  • The relation between the soul and its powers
  • Arguments against a real distinction
  • Arguments in favor of a real distinction
  • Some preliminary conclusions
  • A chronological list of consulted commentaries
  • The identification of the soul with its powers
  • The soul's presence in the body
  • From annulose to perfect animals
  • Is the soul extended or not?
  • The discussion of the soul's presence after Ockham
  • Is the power of sight really present in the foot?
  • From annulose animals to perfect animals
  • From animal soul to human soul
  • The intellective soul : material or immaterial?
  • Epilogue and conclusions
  • Orthography, punctuation and translations
  • The fragile unity of the science of the soul
  • Final conclusions
  • Bibliography
  • Manuscripts
  • Published sources
  • Secondary literature
  • Index Codicum Manuscriptorum
  • Index Nominum
  • Overview
  • The introduction of the De anima into the Latin West
Control code
ocn840613601
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789461660787
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctt8xnfgc
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)840613601

Library Locations

    • Copley LibraryBorrow it
      5998 Alcalá Park, San Diego, CA, 92110-2492, US
      32.771354 -117.193327
Processing Feedback ...