The Resource "Young Hickory" : the life and times of President James K. Polk, Martha McBride Morrel

"Young Hickory" : the life and times of President James K. Polk, Martha McBride Morrel

Label
"Young Hickory" : the life and times of President James K. Polk
Title
"Young Hickory"
Title remainder
the life and times of President James K. Polk
Statement of responsibility
Martha McBride Morrel
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
A biography of our eleventh President, who previously served as a U.S. Congressman and a Governor of Tennessee
Member of
Action
digitized
Biography type
individual biography
Cataloging source
OCLCE
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/collectionName
HeinOnline
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1903-1989
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Morrel, Martha McBride
Illustrations
portraits
Index
index present
LC call number
E417
LC item number
.M67 1949 ONLINE
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Polk, James K.
  • Polk, James K.
Label
"Young Hickory" : the life and times of President James K. Polk, Martha McBride Morrel
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Antecedent source
file reproduced from original
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 374-376) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
black and white
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Polk's second year in Congress set the pattern of his and Sarah's life for more than a decade to come
  • Opening of the Erie Canal, in 1825, and completion, two years later, of the nation's first railroad had given impetus to the clamor for internal improvements
  • In the fall of 1833, the Polks hurried toward Washington in their own carriage
  • Speaker Stevenson remained in Congress, which was a disappointment
  • The
  • "Monster" was slain, the "Czar" deposed
  • Polk, at 39, was a veteran congressman with 10 years of experience behind him
  • He sits his horse well, Sarah thought as she watched her husband ride off toward the center of town
  • Sarah wished she could grasp time in her own two hands and make the summer of 1836 last forever
  • Andrew Jackson was a sick man and he should have stayed in bed
  • Samuel Polk swung his axe with strong, measured strokes while his father, Ezekiel, watched in silence
  • Sarah chatted with Dolly Madison as casually as if they were visiting over a cup of tea
  • Speaker Polk found himself in the position of the tightrope walker, with those holding the two ends of the rope trying to jerk it out of each other's hands
  • Polk often seemed slow about making up his mind
  • Henry Clay came over from the Senate to bid farewell to Speaker Polk
  • On Monday morning, the 14th of October, 1839, Nashville's First Presbyterian Church was filled to capacity
  • Polk made no public response to the legislature's nomination
  • Cherry Street was a checkerboard of light and darkness, proclaiming the political faith of its residents
  • Free barbecues; parades by day and by night; handbills bearing caricatures and slander; barrels of Whig cider and barrels of Democratic whiskey; songs, mottos, and slogans; newspapers filled with hyperbolic editorials that made the blood tingle with pride or anger
  • On the 16th of November, Polk learned that it was the Whigs, and not the "legitimate children of the Genius of Liberty," who had won in Pennsylvania
  • "Which side do you want, Governor?" Mr. Jones asked, hanging his hat on one of the bedposts
  • The
  • Although no one suspected it at the time, Polk's destiny was settled midway between his first and second defeats --
  • Baby grew into a frail child, well-formed, but small for his age
  • Jim Polk and Tennessee were the same age
  • Sarah was never one to sit back and wait for destiny, leastwise is a little tactful plotting would speed it on its way
  • The
  • Summer of 1825 found the "Napoleon of the Stump" on tour again
  • "Can I ride with them just as far as the creek?" Sam begged
  • On Inauguration Day, war clouds bordered the horizon
  • Tyler had tried to cut the pattern for his successor's Oregon policy as well as that of Texas
  • On April 23, 1846, the same day on which Paredes issued his proclamation of war, the Congress of the United States passed an act authorizing termination of the Oregon Treaty
  • At 6 o'clock on Saturday evening, May 9, 1846, Polk received word of the attack on Taylor's forces
  • "You can't keep this up indefinitely," Sarah told her husband
  • Four months after his supposed holiday at Fortress Munroe, the president was beset by a succession of illnesses
  • Joanna Rucker, Knox Walker, and the latter's wife and children were long-term guests
  • Late in January, Polk wrote in his diary : "I am responsible for the conduct of the war, yet Congress refused to give me a commander in whom I have confidence and I am compelled to employ officers whom the law has provided, however unfit they may be"
  • Polk's first hint of what Scott and Trist were up to came in a letter received on the 14th of September
  • A
  • From November, 1843 until February, 1844, the Nashville Union carried the following on its masthead : For President the nominee of the Baltimore Convention for Vice-President James K. Polk of Tennessee
  • Feathery snow fell over Washington, obliterating the wheel tracks in the White House driveway and covering the footprints around the entrance
  • Henry Clay was 71
  • On the 7th of November, 1848, nearly 3 million voters went to the polls
  • Spain's rejection of our bid for Cuba seemed of small importance
  • Polk's last week in office was filled with grave consultations and trivial interruptions
  • "Shh!" Sarah whispered, as she admitted her maid to the bedroom
  • When Polk left the capital on the 6th of March, he had a severe cold and was exhausted by strain and overwork
  • Grundy Place, rechristened Polk Place, should have been ready for immediate occupancy
  • A
  • Hush lay over Polk Place
  • Polk was genuinely surprised
  • Epilogue : Press reaction to Polk's death fell into three general categories
  • A
  • Fortnight later, the convention opened to the boom of cannon
  • To all but a handful of men, Polk's nomination was as astonishing as a thunderclap on a clear day
  • General Armstrong, alone in the Nashville post office, glanced at the clock and pulled his chair closer to the stove
  • Young Hickory was late getting to his office
  • On Tuesday, the 28th of January, Middle Tennessee was veiled in a misty rain that turned to snow as the day wore on
Control code
559276611
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
First edition
Extent
1 online resource (381 pages)
Form of item
online
Level of compression
  • lossless
  • lossy
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Other physical details
portraits
Reformatting quality
  • preservation
  • access
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)559276611
System details
Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002.
Label
"Young Hickory" : the life and times of President James K. Polk, Martha McBride Morrel
Publication
Copyright
Antecedent source
file reproduced from original
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 374-376) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
black and white
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Polk's second year in Congress set the pattern of his and Sarah's life for more than a decade to come
  • Opening of the Erie Canal, in 1825, and completion, two years later, of the nation's first railroad had given impetus to the clamor for internal improvements
  • In the fall of 1833, the Polks hurried toward Washington in their own carriage
  • Speaker Stevenson remained in Congress, which was a disappointment
  • The
  • "Monster" was slain, the "Czar" deposed
  • Polk, at 39, was a veteran congressman with 10 years of experience behind him
  • He sits his horse well, Sarah thought as she watched her husband ride off toward the center of town
  • Sarah wished she could grasp time in her own two hands and make the summer of 1836 last forever
  • Andrew Jackson was a sick man and he should have stayed in bed
  • Samuel Polk swung his axe with strong, measured strokes while his father, Ezekiel, watched in silence
  • Sarah chatted with Dolly Madison as casually as if they were visiting over a cup of tea
  • Speaker Polk found himself in the position of the tightrope walker, with those holding the two ends of the rope trying to jerk it out of each other's hands
  • Polk often seemed slow about making up his mind
  • Henry Clay came over from the Senate to bid farewell to Speaker Polk
  • On Monday morning, the 14th of October, 1839, Nashville's First Presbyterian Church was filled to capacity
  • Polk made no public response to the legislature's nomination
  • Cherry Street was a checkerboard of light and darkness, proclaiming the political faith of its residents
  • Free barbecues; parades by day and by night; handbills bearing caricatures and slander; barrels of Whig cider and barrels of Democratic whiskey; songs, mottos, and slogans; newspapers filled with hyperbolic editorials that made the blood tingle with pride or anger
  • On the 16th of November, Polk learned that it was the Whigs, and not the "legitimate children of the Genius of Liberty," who had won in Pennsylvania
  • "Which side do you want, Governor?" Mr. Jones asked, hanging his hat on one of the bedposts
  • The
  • Although no one suspected it at the time, Polk's destiny was settled midway between his first and second defeats --
  • Baby grew into a frail child, well-formed, but small for his age
  • Jim Polk and Tennessee were the same age
  • Sarah was never one to sit back and wait for destiny, leastwise is a little tactful plotting would speed it on its way
  • The
  • Summer of 1825 found the "Napoleon of the Stump" on tour again
  • "Can I ride with them just as far as the creek?" Sam begged
  • On Inauguration Day, war clouds bordered the horizon
  • Tyler had tried to cut the pattern for his successor's Oregon policy as well as that of Texas
  • On April 23, 1846, the same day on which Paredes issued his proclamation of war, the Congress of the United States passed an act authorizing termination of the Oregon Treaty
  • At 6 o'clock on Saturday evening, May 9, 1846, Polk received word of the attack on Taylor's forces
  • "You can't keep this up indefinitely," Sarah told her husband
  • Four months after his supposed holiday at Fortress Munroe, the president was beset by a succession of illnesses
  • Joanna Rucker, Knox Walker, and the latter's wife and children were long-term guests
  • Late in January, Polk wrote in his diary : "I am responsible for the conduct of the war, yet Congress refused to give me a commander in whom I have confidence and I am compelled to employ officers whom the law has provided, however unfit they may be"
  • Polk's first hint of what Scott and Trist were up to came in a letter received on the 14th of September
  • A
  • From November, 1843 until February, 1844, the Nashville Union carried the following on its masthead : For President the nominee of the Baltimore Convention for Vice-President James K. Polk of Tennessee
  • Feathery snow fell over Washington, obliterating the wheel tracks in the White House driveway and covering the footprints around the entrance
  • Henry Clay was 71
  • On the 7th of November, 1848, nearly 3 million voters went to the polls
  • Spain's rejection of our bid for Cuba seemed of small importance
  • Polk's last week in office was filled with grave consultations and trivial interruptions
  • "Shh!" Sarah whispered, as she admitted her maid to the bedroom
  • When Polk left the capital on the 6th of March, he had a severe cold and was exhausted by strain and overwork
  • Grundy Place, rechristened Polk Place, should have been ready for immediate occupancy
  • A
  • Hush lay over Polk Place
  • Polk was genuinely surprised
  • Epilogue : Press reaction to Polk's death fell into three general categories
  • A
  • Fortnight later, the convention opened to the boom of cannon
  • To all but a handful of men, Polk's nomination was as astonishing as a thunderclap on a clear day
  • General Armstrong, alone in the Nashville post office, glanced at the clock and pulled his chair closer to the stove
  • Young Hickory was late getting to his office
  • On Tuesday, the 28th of January, Middle Tennessee was veiled in a misty rain that turned to snow as the day wore on
Control code
559276611
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
First edition
Extent
1 online resource (381 pages)
Form of item
online
Level of compression
  • lossless
  • lossy
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Other physical details
portraits
Reformatting quality
  • preservation
  • access
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)559276611
System details
Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002.

Library Locations

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