Coverart for item
The Resource Young criminal lives : life courses and life chances from 1850, Barry Godfrey, Pamela Cox, Heather Shore, Zoe Alker

Young criminal lives : life courses and life chances from 1850, Barry Godfrey, Pamela Cox, Heather Shore, Zoe Alker

Label
Young criminal lives : life courses and life chances from 1850
Title
Young criminal lives
Title remainder
life courses and life chances from 1850
Statement of responsibility
Barry Godfrey, Pamela Cox, Heather Shore, Zoe Alker
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Young Criminal Lives is the first cradle-to-grave study of the experiences of some of the thousands of delinquent, difficult and destitute children passing through the early English juvenile reformatory system. The book breaks new ground in crime research, speaking to pressing present-day concerns around child poverty and youth justice, and resonating with a powerful public fascination for family history. Using innovative digital methods to unlock the Victorian life course, the authors have reconstructed the lives, families and neighbourhoods of 500 children living within, or at the margins of, the early English juvenile reformatory system. Four hundred of them were sent to reformatory and industrial schools in the north west of England from courts around the UK over a fifty-year period from the 1860s onwards. Young Criminal Lives is based on one of the most comprehensive sets of official and personal data ever assembled for a historical study of this kind. For the first time, these children can be followed on their journey in and out of reform and then though their adulthood and old age. The book centres on institutions celebrated in this period for their pioneering new approaches to child welfare and others that were investigated for cruelty and scandal. Both were typical of the new kind of state-certified provision offered, from the 1850s on, to children who had committed criminal acts, or who were considered 'vulnerable' to predation, poverty and the 'inheritance' of criminal dispositions. The notion that interventions can and must be evaluated in order to determine 'what works' now dominates public policy. But how did Victorian and Edwardian policy-makers and practitioners deal with this question? By what criteria, and on the basis of what kinds of evidence, did they judge their own successes and failures? Young Criminal Lives ends with a critical review of the historical rise of evidence-based policy-making within criminal justice. It will appeal to scholars and students of crime and penal policy, criminologists, sociologists, and social policy researchers and practitioners in youth justice and child protection
Member of
Cataloging source
YDX
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/collectionName
Oxford Scholarship Online
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Godfrey, Barry S
Index
index present
LC call number
HV9145.A5 ONLINE
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
  • 1970-
  • 1964-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Cox, Pamela
  • Shore, Heather
  • Alker, Zoe
Series statement
Clarendon studies in criminology
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • Juvenile delinquents
  • Juvenile justice, Administration of
  • Youth
  • Criminal behavior
  • Criminal behavior
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • Juvenile delinquents
  • Juvenile justice, Administration of
  • Youth
  • Great Britain
Label
Young criminal lives : life courses and life chances from 1850, Barry Godfrey, Pamela Cox, Heather Shore, Zoe Alker
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • p. 12.
  • p. 116.
  • Military Service and Desistance
  • p. 118.
  • Licensing Success
  • p. 122.
  • Supervision and Reintegration
  • p. 126.
  • Supervision, Reintegration, and Relationship-fotmation
  • p. 128.
  • Supervision, Reintegration, Relationship-formation, and Employment
  • Overview of Young Criminal Lives
  • p. 130.
  • Supervision, Reintegration, Relationship-formation, Employment (and Everything Else)
  • p. 134.
  • The
  • 'British Dream'?
  • p. 135.
  • 7.
  • After Care: Troubled Lives?
  • p. 137.
  • Reoffending
  • p. 14.
  • p. 137.
  • Re-institutionalization
  • p. 142.
  • Reasons for Reoffending
  • p. 146.
  • Supervision and Reintegration
  • p. 148.
  • Supervision, Reintegration, and Relationship-formation
  • p. 154.
  • Supervision, Reintegration, Relationship-formation, and Employment
  • 2.
  • p. 158.
  • The
  • 'British Nightmare'
  • p. 160.
  • When the State Steps In
  • p. 163.
  • 8.
  • What Worked? Who Cared?
  • p. 165.
  • The
  • The
  • Rise of 'What Works' Approaches
  • p. 165.
  • Evidencing the 'Impacts' of the Early Youth Justice System
  • p. 166.
  • 'What Worked': a Life Course View
  • p. 175.
  • Young Criminal Lives: Explaining Life Chances and Life Courses
  • p. 178.
  • Child Removal and Long Institutional Sentences
  • p. 181.
  • National System and Local Delivery of Youth Justice
  • Juvenile and Young Adult Labour Market
  • p. 184.
  • Affective Relationships
  • p. 185.
  • 9.
  • History, Child Removal, and Youth Justice Policy
  • p. 188.
  • New Futures for the Youth Justice and Care Systems?
  • p. 189
  • p. 18.
  • The
  • Contexts of 'Reform'
  • p. 18.
  • 1.
  • Poverty
  • p. 19.
  • Education
  • p. 20.
  • Philanthropy
  • p. 23.
  • Crime
  • p. 24.
  • Youth Justice and Child Protection
  • p. 26.
  • Introduction
  • Industrial and Reformatory Schools
  • p. 28.
  • Governing the Youth Justice System: Transparency and its Limits
  • p. 32.
  • Youth Justice Networks in North-west England
  • p. 36.
  • Conclusion
  • p. 41.
  • 3.
  • Our Sample and Our Sources
  • p. 1.
  • p. 43.
  • Our Sample
  • p. 43.
  • Gender, Ethnicity, Religion, and Geography
  • p. 45.
  • Our Sources
  • p. 47.
  • Analysing Lives
  • p. 52.
  • Ethical Issues
  • Criminologists, Historians, and the Life Course
  • p. 57.
  • 4.
  • Life Before the Institution
  • p. 60.
  • Entering the Institution
  • p. 60.
  • The
  • Court as Child Sorting Mechanism?
  • p. 62.
  • Enduring 'Explanations' for Juvenile Delinquency
  • p. 3.
  • p. 69.
  • 'Poor Parents': Immorality at Home
  • p. 71.
  • Criminal Parents and Intergenerational Transmission
  • p. 72.
  • Troubled Family Lives
  • p. 73.
  • Parental Poverty
  • p. 78.
  • Conclusion
  • Criminologists, Historians, and Life Chances
  • p. 84.
  • 5.
  • In the System
  • p. 86.
  • Institutional Regimes: Training, Rewards, and Reformation
  • p. 87.
  • Leisure Activities
  • p. 92.
  • Personal Relationships
  • p. 94.
  • p. 10.
  • Discipline and Punishment
  • p. 95.
  • Deaths in Custody
  • p. 96.
  • Abuse
  • p. 98.
  • Resistance
  • p. 100.
  • Governance
  • p. 102.
  • Structural Inequality, Social Change, and Life Chances
  • Licences and Work Placements
  • p. 105.
  • Conclusion
  • p. 108.
  • 6.
  • After Care: Successful Lives?
  • p. 111.
  • Assembling the Data
  • p. 114.
  • Growing Up and Growing Out of Crime
Control code
1008775668
Edition
First edition
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780191092749
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1008775668
Label
Young criminal lives : life courses and life chances from 1850, Barry Godfrey, Pamela Cox, Heather Shore, Zoe Alker
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • p. 12.
  • p. 116.
  • Military Service and Desistance
  • p. 118.
  • Licensing Success
  • p. 122.
  • Supervision and Reintegration
  • p. 126.
  • Supervision, Reintegration, and Relationship-fotmation
  • p. 128.
  • Supervision, Reintegration, Relationship-formation, and Employment
  • Overview of Young Criminal Lives
  • p. 130.
  • Supervision, Reintegration, Relationship-formation, Employment (and Everything Else)
  • p. 134.
  • The
  • 'British Dream'?
  • p. 135.
  • 7.
  • After Care: Troubled Lives?
  • p. 137.
  • Reoffending
  • p. 14.
  • p. 137.
  • Re-institutionalization
  • p. 142.
  • Reasons for Reoffending
  • p. 146.
  • Supervision and Reintegration
  • p. 148.
  • Supervision, Reintegration, and Relationship-formation
  • p. 154.
  • Supervision, Reintegration, Relationship-formation, and Employment
  • 2.
  • p. 158.
  • The
  • 'British Nightmare'
  • p. 160.
  • When the State Steps In
  • p. 163.
  • 8.
  • What Worked? Who Cared?
  • p. 165.
  • The
  • The
  • Rise of 'What Works' Approaches
  • p. 165.
  • Evidencing the 'Impacts' of the Early Youth Justice System
  • p. 166.
  • 'What Worked': a Life Course View
  • p. 175.
  • Young Criminal Lives: Explaining Life Chances and Life Courses
  • p. 178.
  • Child Removal and Long Institutional Sentences
  • p. 181.
  • National System and Local Delivery of Youth Justice
  • Juvenile and Young Adult Labour Market
  • p. 184.
  • Affective Relationships
  • p. 185.
  • 9.
  • History, Child Removal, and Youth Justice Policy
  • p. 188.
  • New Futures for the Youth Justice and Care Systems?
  • p. 189
  • p. 18.
  • The
  • Contexts of 'Reform'
  • p. 18.
  • 1.
  • Poverty
  • p. 19.
  • Education
  • p. 20.
  • Philanthropy
  • p. 23.
  • Crime
  • p. 24.
  • Youth Justice and Child Protection
  • p. 26.
  • Introduction
  • Industrial and Reformatory Schools
  • p. 28.
  • Governing the Youth Justice System: Transparency and its Limits
  • p. 32.
  • Youth Justice Networks in North-west England
  • p. 36.
  • Conclusion
  • p. 41.
  • 3.
  • Our Sample and Our Sources
  • p. 1.
  • p. 43.
  • Our Sample
  • p. 43.
  • Gender, Ethnicity, Religion, and Geography
  • p. 45.
  • Our Sources
  • p. 47.
  • Analysing Lives
  • p. 52.
  • Ethical Issues
  • Criminologists, Historians, and the Life Course
  • p. 57.
  • 4.
  • Life Before the Institution
  • p. 60.
  • Entering the Institution
  • p. 60.
  • The
  • Court as Child Sorting Mechanism?
  • p. 62.
  • Enduring 'Explanations' for Juvenile Delinquency
  • p. 3.
  • p. 69.
  • 'Poor Parents': Immorality at Home
  • p. 71.
  • Criminal Parents and Intergenerational Transmission
  • p. 72.
  • Troubled Family Lives
  • p. 73.
  • Parental Poverty
  • p. 78.
  • Conclusion
  • Criminologists, Historians, and Life Chances
  • p. 84.
  • 5.
  • In the System
  • p. 86.
  • Institutional Regimes: Training, Rewards, and Reformation
  • p. 87.
  • Leisure Activities
  • p. 92.
  • Personal Relationships
  • p. 94.
  • p. 10.
  • Discipline and Punishment
  • p. 95.
  • Deaths in Custody
  • p. 96.
  • Abuse
  • p. 98.
  • Resistance
  • p. 100.
  • Governance
  • p. 102.
  • Structural Inequality, Social Change, and Life Chances
  • Licences and Work Placements
  • p. 105.
  • Conclusion
  • p. 108.
  • 6.
  • After Care: Successful Lives?
  • p. 111.
  • Assembling the Data
  • p. 114.
  • Growing Up and Growing Out of Crime
Control code
1008775668
Edition
First edition
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780191092749
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1008775668

Library Locations

    • Pardee Legal Research CenterBorrow it
      5998 Alcalá Park, San Diego, CA, 92110-2492, US
      32.771471 -117.187496
Processing Feedback ...