Coverart for item
The Resource How we hear music : the relationship between music and the hearing mechanism, James Beament

How we hear music : the relationship between music and the hearing mechanism, James Beament

Label
How we hear music : the relationship between music and the hearing mechanism
Title
How we hear music
Title remainder
the relationship between music and the hearing mechanism
Statement of responsibility
James Beament
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • This book begins by discussing the early evolution of simple 'Western' tonal music; what exactly were the characteristics of the intervals and scales which hearing selected. It then considers problems such as what hearing has selected as instrumental tone, and why we have such a peculiar assessment of loudness; why is that independent of pitch, and why is hearing so sensitive to time? Does the mechanism of hearing determine our pitch discrimination, which differs so much across our hearing range? Amongst other things, this discussion leads to the conclusion that the harmonics of musical sounds, which are the basis of so much theory about music, did not and cannot play the role which has been so widely attributed to them ever since the work of Helmholtz in 1870. There follows a simplified account of the hearing mechanism: how musical sound is coded by the ear, the nature of the processing stations through which the information passes before it creates sensation in the cortex, and the extent to which it provides answers to the questions which have been raised. This produces a rather different view of the basis of some fundamental features of music from those which are commonly held. It also leads to the conclusion that music started with primitive instruments rather than with the human voice. Finally, the biological reasons for the hearing mechanism behaving as it does are explained, and thus the reasons for the sensations of music being experienced in the way they are
  • Outstanding Academic Title (2002) Our hearing system chose the sounds for music. During the past fifty years there have been spectacular advances in our knowledge of how that system works and it seems possible that it might provide explanations for a range of musical phenomena. This book begins by discussing the early evolution of simple 'western' tonal music; what exactly were the characteristics of the intervals and scales which hearing selected. It then considers problems such as what hearing has selected as instrumental tone, and why we have such a peculiar assessment of loudness; why is that independent of pitch, and why is hearing so sensitive to time? Does the mechanism of hearing determine our pitch discrimination, which differs so much across our hearing range? Amongst other things, this discussion leads to the conclusion that the harmonics of musical sounds, which are the basis of so much theory about music, did not and cannot play the role which has been so widely attributed to them ever since the work of Helmholtz in 1870. There follows a simplified account of the hearing mechanism: how musical sound is coded by the ear, the nature of the processing stations through which the information passes before it creates sensation in the cortex, and the extent to which it provides answers to the questions which have been raised. This produces a rather different view of the basis of some fundamental features of music from those which are commonly held. It also leads to the conclusion that music started with primitive instruments rather than with the human voice. Finally, the biological reasons for the hearing mechanism behaving as it does are explained, and thus the reasons for the sensations of music being experienced in the way they are. No scientific knowledge is assumed; any simple physical acoustics required is explained, and there are no mathematical equations. The late Professor Sir JAMES BEAMENT was a distinguished scientist and musician, who taught and examined music students at Cambridge University
Cataloging source
E7B
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1921-2005
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Beament, James
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Musical perception
  • Hearing
  • Music
  • Hearing
  • Music
  • Musical perception
Label
How we hear music : the relationship between music and the hearing mechanism, James Beament
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 171-172) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
1. Preliminaries -- 2. Aural archaeology -- 3. Hearing selects intervals -- 4. The beguiling harmonic theory -- 5. The imitating voice -- 6. Hearing simultaneous pitches -- 7. Patterns in harmony -- 8. Loudness -- 9. Music through the hearing machine -- 10. A sense of direction -- 11. Time and rhythm -- 12. Conclusions -- Appendices: 1. Interval names -- 2. Selecting pentatonic pitches -- 3. An alternative dodecaphonic route -- 4. Pitch discrimination and intervals -- 5. Tuning a keyboard by beats -- 6. The abominable cent -- 7. Repetition rates -- 8. Anatomical evolution -- 9. The primitive processor? -- 10. The ear structures -- 11. Hair cells -- 12. Recording auditory nerve pulses -- 13. The irregular distribution of pulses -- 14. The length of resonant vibrations -- 15. The place theory -- 16. Loudness -- 17. Memory storage and recovery of pitches -- 18. Signalling direction -- 19. Words and scents
Control code
ocn646832048
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xiv, 174 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781846154416
Lccn
00067512
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)646832048
Label
How we hear music : the relationship between music and the hearing mechanism, James Beament
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 171-172) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
1. Preliminaries -- 2. Aural archaeology -- 3. Hearing selects intervals -- 4. The beguiling harmonic theory -- 5. The imitating voice -- 6. Hearing simultaneous pitches -- 7. Patterns in harmony -- 8. Loudness -- 9. Music through the hearing machine -- 10. A sense of direction -- 11. Time and rhythm -- 12. Conclusions -- Appendices: 1. Interval names -- 2. Selecting pentatonic pitches -- 3. An alternative dodecaphonic route -- 4. Pitch discrimination and intervals -- 5. Tuning a keyboard by beats -- 6. The abominable cent -- 7. Repetition rates -- 8. Anatomical evolution -- 9. The primitive processor? -- 10. The ear structures -- 11. Hair cells -- 12. Recording auditory nerve pulses -- 13. The irregular distribution of pulses -- 14. The length of resonant vibrations -- 15. The place theory -- 16. Loudness -- 17. Memory storage and recovery of pitches -- 18. Signalling direction -- 19. Words and scents
Control code
ocn646832048
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xiv, 174 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781846154416
Lccn
00067512
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
JSTOR
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)646832048

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